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Airam HgSL 160w

Airam HgSL 160w

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Airam sbmv from 80's. Nos lamp. My second Airam sbmv.

WP_20170813_17_36_39_Pro.jpg WP_20170813_17_30_30_Pro.jpg Airam_HgSL.jpg Airam_150_260.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Airam
Model Reference:HgSL 160w
Lamp
Base:E27
Electrical
Wattage:160w
Voltage:220-230v
Physical/Production
Factory Location:Finland
Fabrication Date:80's

File information

File information

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Filename:Airam_HgSL.jpg
Album name:Roi_hartmann / Lamps & bulbs
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:337 KB
Date added:Aug 12, 2017
Dimensions:2464 x 1354 pixels
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merc
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Adam


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Aug 12, 2017 at 02:03 PM Author: merc
While not efficiency kings, they're cool lamps.

Not a misoLEDist...

Roi_hartmann
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Aug 12, 2017 at 03:49 PM Author: Roi_hartmann
Yeah, but these are kinda rare. I have only seen one installation ever using sbmv lamps and it was old warehouse from 50's that was torn down last year.

Other than that sometimes I have seen these used as quick fix to get ballast faulty mv fixture working temporarily until fixing it right later.

Aamulla aurinko, illalla AIRAM

James
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Aug 14, 2017 at 06:01 AM Author: James
What a rare lamp you found. I am curious, does it have a hard glass bulb? All the other Airam low wattage mercury lamps I have come across were hard glass, even though it is not technically necessary and other manufacturers use soft glass for the lower power lamps.
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Aug 14, 2017 at 10:19 AM Author: Roi_hartmann
I dont know. Can I check it somehow?

Aamulla aurinko, illalla AIRAM

James
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Aug 14, 2017 at 11:09 AM Author: James
Hi Roi, you can tell from the colour of the metal wires passing through the stem press. If they are red or salmon colour, then the wires are copper plated 42% nickel-iron, which is used for soft glass lamps. The glass of the bulb will also be lightweight and thin at about 0.6mm thickness. If the wires are straw yellow to greyish colour then they are made of tungsten, which is used for sealing to hard glass. The bulb will also be heavy and about 2mm thick.
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Aug 15, 2017 at 03:44 AM Author: Roi_hartmann
I did not know you could tell that from the colour. This sbmv lamp has red wires so it's made of soft glass. See here http://www.whitenightcape.com/kuv/sekavalo.jpg do you know for what purpose there is that metal clip thing pressed againts the stem? Old Airam mv lamps have it aswell.

That hard glass thing is also interesting. I did dig out from my storage some old 80w Airam HgLX lamps and those really seem to be hard glass ones. Here is a picture from stem http://www.whitenightcape.com/kuv/80base.jpg

Those lamps are also heavy, weighting 90 grams without a package while last of the Osram mv lamps of same wattage weight only 51 grams. Also since for some reason the thickness of the phosphor coating varied greatly, one lamp with especially thin coating made me notice that those lamps had dual starting probes. I've heard something like that is being used in some lamps but I have always thought it was only used in higher wattage lamps. Here is a picture. It was quite hard to get the camera see but with bare eyes you can clearly see two wires going in to the arc tube from both ends and two staring resistors. http://www.whitenightcape.com/kuv/Airam80.JPG

Aamulla aurinko, illalla AIRAM

James
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Aug 15, 2017 at 04:55 AM Author: James
Thanks Roi, strange that they would use hardglass for all the normal mercury lamps but soft for the self-ballasted.

The metal shield against the stem is to prevent the phosphor coating being blown off the bulb during the lamp exhausting process. On the higher speed machines, instead of just continually pumping vacuum until all the air is gone and then backfilling with nitrogen, the lamps are pumped roughly and then flushed with nitrogen in multiple cycles. When the nitrogen rushes in, it can blow the powder coating off the bulb near the neck. The metal shield simply deflects the jet of gas away from the coating. On later lamps the adhesion of the coating was improved, and the stems were made with two holes instead of one. That allowed the shield to be dispensed with.

Two starting probes are sometimes necessary in case of very cold atmospheres, such as you may encounter in Finland. Once again the later lamps were made with improved gas purity which enabled starting down to -40°C with a single auxiliary electrode, but in the earlier days some manufacturers needed two.
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Aug 25, 2017 at 07:26 AM Author: Roi_hartmann
I couldn't get this out of my mind since I remembered there was something about it in some technical publications. Here is some sort of summary

Standart (HgL) and de Luxe (HgLX) mercury vapor lamps had a hard glass buld atleast from 1971. In a guide from that year, it's been put on phrase "nowadays has" meaning that has not been the case always. The standart lamps were apparently phased out at some point before 1975 as those are not mentioned anymore in guide from thst year or newer. Even I dont have HgL in my collection. HgLX used better phosphor. For 125w lamp L->LX 5600lm->6200lm. Could not find any spectral diagram for HgL but one for HgLX. Wattages available from 80w to 1000w.

Lanthanida (HgLn) lamps had soft glass bulb. Wattages mentioned: 1971 80w and 125w. 1973-1975 50w, 80w, 125w and 400w. 1978 50w and 125w.

1978 guide mentions reflector mv lamps with wattages 250w, 400w and 700w

Atleast in 1975 clear mv lamps are being said to made by special order.

SBMV lamps with wattages 160w and 250 had a soft glass bulb, 500w used hard glass. This seemed to remain unchanged thru 70's.

Aamulla aurinko, illalla AIRAM

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