Return to the thumbnail page Display/hide file information See next file

Comparison between European and American Plugs

Comparison between European and American Plugs

Click to view full size image

Here I picked up the power cable for the laptop power adapter that will not fit in our outlets. I wanted to show the comparison between this and Computer Power Cable that I have lying out.

PA110750.JPG 0916171404.jpg P5230712.JPG PC210685.JPG

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:HP and Lenovo
Model Reference:P/N 213350-009 and P/N 54Y8280
Lamp
Base:CEE 7/7 (?) (Male) and NEMA 5-15 (Male)
Fixture
Socket Type:IEC 60320 C5 (Female) and IEC 60320 C13 (Female)
Electrical
Wattage:4000 VA and 1250 VA
Voltage:250 Volts and 125 Volts
Current:16 Amps and 10 Amps
Physical/Production
Factory Location:China
Fabrication Date:September 2017 (0917) and 38th Week of 2015

File information

File information

Download: Download this File
Filename:PA110750.JPG
Album name:rjluna2 / My Collections
Keywords:Miscellaneous
File Size:763 KB
Date added:Oct 11, 2017
Dimensions:2048 x 1536 pixels
Displayed:108 times
Date Time:2017:10:11 16:40:49
DateTime Original:2017:10:11 16:40:49
Exposure Bias:0 EV
Exposure Time:1/30 sec
FNumber:f 3.1
Flash:Flash, Auto-Mode
Focal length:6.3 mm
ISO:125
Make:OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.
Model:FE210,X775
Software:1.0
White Balance:0
URL:http://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-138508
Favorites:Add to Favorites
Comments
merc
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 225
View Gallery

Adam


GoL
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 11, 2017 at 04:38 PM Author: merc
That's correct. Btw. here (Czech rep.) and some other countries (Slovakia, Poland, ...) use the middle plug contact while other countries (Germany, Austria, ...) use the outer (Schuko) contacts. This plug is compatible with both systems...

Not a misoLEDist...

dor123
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1999
View Gallery
My other loves are computers and office equipment


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 11, 2017 at 11:10 PM Author: dor123
Why the European cables don't have earth and the American cable have? The Israel SI32 (Type H), have an earth as well.

I"m don't speak english well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I hope that LED won't replace all forms of other lighting.

merc
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 225
View Gallery

Adam


GoL
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 12, 2017 at 12:15 AM Author: merc

Why the European cables don't have earth and the American cable have? The Israel SI32 (Type H), have an earth as well.

Both middle plug contact (the hole) and outer (Schuko) contacts are earth.
(There are also flat plugs without it /compatible with the same sockets/ for double isolation appliances that don't need it.)

Not a misoLEDist...

dor123
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1999
View Gallery
My other loves are computers and office equipment


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 12, 2017 at 01:01 AM Author: dor123
Is in European plugs, the the earth is male and the line and neutral female?

I"m don't speak english well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I hope that LED won't replace all forms of other lighting.

merc
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 225
View Gallery

Adam


GoL
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 12, 2017 at 01:16 AM Author: merc

Is in European plugs, the the earth is male and the line and neutral female?

The earth (PE) is that hole you can see in the picture and the outer contacts (you can see they're metallically interconnected) - so it's female (on the plug).
The neutral (N) is the left (from this view) male pin (goes to the right hole in the outlet).

Not a misoLEDist...

marcopete87
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 244
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 12, 2017 at 01:19 AM Author: marcopete87
depend on standard you have, here in Italy, we have both of:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schuko
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AC_power_plugs_and_sockets#Italy_.28Type_L.29

However, i don't like very much schuko.
Ash
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Posts: 3204
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 12, 2017 at 01:55 AM Author: Ash
I think the best thing about Schuko and Italian standards is that the plug is non polarized

This means that electricians, appliance designers and so on cannot count on getting Phase/Neutral supplied in a certain way. This enforces the mindset that both Phase and Neutral are equally functional and live, and are to be equally treated

In places where well defined Phase and Neutral are the standard, there is often negligence with the Neutral from sparkies - Assuming it is safe to touch, not isolating it well from the appliance body, and occasionally even from the standards themselfes e.g. the "Neutral on the screw shell of the light socket is safe" thing (instead of using a socket that actually disconnects both when the lamp is being screwed out)
merc
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 225
View Gallery

Adam


GoL
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 12, 2017 at 04:59 AM Author: merc

I think the best thing about Schuko and Italian standards is that the plug is non polarized

+1

We used to have splitters like this:



with swapped L / N on one side.
That was apparently an issue which the manufacturer fixed by rotating the affected side by 180° - (with PE down) but with correct L / N positions without the need to change the internal construction radically. Actually, in the picture is already the fixed version.

Not a misoLEDist...

marcopete87
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 244
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 12, 2017 at 08:13 AM Author: marcopete87

I think the best thing about Schuko and Italian standards is that the plug is non polarized

This means that electricians, appliance designers and so on cannot count on getting Phase/Neutral supplied in a certain way. This enforces the mindset that both Phase and Neutral are equally functional and live, and are to be equally treated

In places where well defined Phase and Neutral are the standard, there is often negligence with the Neutral from sparkies - Assuming it is safe to touch, not isolating it well from the appliance body, and occasionally even from the standards themselfes e.g. the "Neutral on the screw shell of the light socket is safe" thing (instead of using a socket that actually disconnects both when the lamp is being screwed out)


Assuming neutral conductor as earth potential (this time i'm typing correctly ) must persecuted as potential manslaughter.
Xytrell
Jr. Member
**
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 77
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 12, 2017 at 09:23 AM Author: Xytrell
That's a 15A plug, not 10A.

It is also worth mentioning that we have standards for 125V/20A, 250V/15A, and 250V/20A that all use the same electrical contacts("prongs"), just in different orientations.

I have personally tested the 15A plugs/sockets at 30A, and the temperature rise is only 25C. The ratings are very conservative. They are not inferior or undersized as some people seem to think.
Ash
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Posts: 3204
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 12, 2017 at 09:26 AM Author: Ash
They are once the plugs and sockets are worn, contacts are oxidized and so on. The conservative ratings are there to account for this
takemorepills
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 21
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 12, 2017 at 02:04 PM Author: takemorepills

That's a 15A plug, not 10A.


Speaking from USA perspective here

That style of plug is called 5-15P. That cordset he has may very well only be rated 10A (at best!) as they typically have very thin wire in the cable, we typically see 20AWG being used these days in those Chinese made cordsets.

The problem with that, is you are right, the plug is nominally 15A, many home circuits have 20A breakers, and the other end of these cordsets could be plugged into something very well capable of drawing 15-20 amps.

When buying these cordsets, you have to specify "heavy duty" to get cordsets with more appropriate wire.
MissRiaElaine
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 21
View Gallery

Interests: Discharge lighting, mainly MV


missriaelaine ria1039
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 12, 2017 at 03:23 PM Author: MissRiaElaine
To me, living in the UK, the thing that stands out to me about both of these plugs, is neither have a fuse. Here, we have the 13A plug and socket on a ring main system, where every plug has a fuse protecting the cable to the appliance.

Ria in Aberdeen

Ash
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Posts: 3204
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 12, 2017 at 03:32 PM Author: Ash
The cables are typically 0.5 mm2 (20AWG)... 0.75mm2 (between 18..19AWG), so good for about 5A..7.5A under average cooling conditions, a bit more under good cooling conditions. 10A through 20AWG is some 2x overload, it ain't gonna last long and ain't gonna end well

A 15A or 20A breaker is ok to protect the wire from short circuit, but there is counting on the user's competence (or luck) to not use the thin wire with high load

Apparently it is good enough for computers, that dont take more than few A max, or for laser printers that can take 10A or more but briefly. Problem would appear with cables that power splitters (rack receptacles, UPSs with more stuff connected on the output...) and more special and less common equipment, that uses the same connector for actual 10A load or close to that (various lab equipment comes to mind)
sol
Hero Member
*****
Online

Posts: 737
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Online)
Oct 12, 2017 at 05:32 PM Author: sol

To me, living in the UK, the thing that stands out to me about both of these plugs, is neither have a fuse. Here, we have the 13A plug and socket on a ring main system, where every plug has a fuse protecting the cable to the appliance.


I have an oscillating fan that has a two prong 15A North American plug with a fuse. They are uncommon, but not unheard of. Most new sets of Christmas lights have them, too. Interestingly, the Christmas lights sold in Canada usually have a non-replaceable fuse in the plug, while the ones sold in the USA have replaceable ones. This is not a hard and fast rule, but I have noticed it is quite common.

Most household appliances here have no fuses at all, and some have a fuse holder in the appliance case. Also, most have between AWG16 to 18.

Oh, and I'll slip in a rant here, why do new toasters have a short lead cord (not really a problem in itself) BUT... why does it come out of the control panel end of the toaster ?? This means when you have your toaster on the counter, the controls need to face the wall so the cord will reach the plug ! Very annoying ! A short cord is fine for security, but at least make it come out of the other end of the machine. OK, end of rant.
rjluna2
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 214
View Gallery

Robert


GoL
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 12, 2017 at 06:03 PM Author: rjluna2

That's a 15A plug, not 10A.

Indeed, the specs is 10 Amps, 125 Volts as the embossed outline described at the IEC 60320 C13 (Female) end.

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

Ash
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Posts: 3204
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 13, 2017 at 12:15 AM Author: Ash

To me, living in the UK, the thing that stands out to me about both of these plugs, is neither have a fuse. Here, we have the 13A plug and socket on a ring main system, where every plug has a fuse protecting the cable to the appliance.

In UK the circuit is protected by 32A breakers - That can hold up to 320A for a second or two without trippingm and somewhat lower currents for much longer. This does not protect the 0.5mm2 cable from short circuits - If there is not dead short with good contact but some loose touching, the current might be below 320A and in this case the cable would melt before the breaker trips

In Europe the circuit is protected by 16A breakers, in US by 15..20A. With 16A, The max short term current (without the breaker tripping immediately) is lower in half vs UK, so the max possible heat shock on the cable is 1/4 of what is in UK. Apparently the 0.5 cables survive the lower shock without damage

Along the cable there can't happen an overload condition, only a short circuit. The overload protection is in the appliance to which the cable goes - Either the appliance cannot fail in a way in which it draws higher current, or there is a fuse or thermal cutout and so on inside the appliance



Oh, and I'll slip in a rant here, why do new toasters have a short lead cord (not really a problem in itself) BUT... why does it come out of the control panel end of the toaster ?? This means when you have your toaster on the counter, the controls need to face the wall so the cord will reach the plug ! Very annoying ! A short cord is fine for security, but at least make it come out of the other end of the machine. OK, end of rant.

To get the cable through the insides of the toaster to the outer side, the cable would be subjected to heat, so they would have to use heat shielding on the cable, They cut that cost
sol
Hero Member
*****
Online

Posts: 737
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Online)
Oct 13, 2017 at 03:32 AM Author: sol

To get the cable through the insides of the toaster to the outer side, the cable would be subjected to heat, so they would have to use heat shielding on the cable, They cut that cost


Yes, I know. It's still frustrating, though. I also wonder what kind of toaster the company engineers use in the morning....
takemorepills
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 21
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 13, 2017 at 06:58 AM Author: takemorepills

Yes, I know. It's still frustrating, though. I also wonder what kind of toaster the company engineers use in the morning....


You KNOW they're using a vintage, American made toaster!
MissRiaElaine
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 21
View Gallery

Interests: Discharge lighting, mainly MV


missriaelaine ria1039
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 13, 2017 at 07:56 AM Author: MissRiaElaine


In UK the circuit is protected by 32A breakers - That can hold up to 320A for a second or two without tripping and somewhat lower currents for much longer. This does not protect the 0.5mm2 cable from short circuits - If there is not dead short with good contact but some loose touching, the current might be below 320A and in this case the cable would melt before the breaker trips


Possibly, but I would rather have fused plugs than not. Yes, the ring main system has its disadvantages, but the advantages outweigh them in my opinion.

Ria in Aberdeen

Xytrell
Jr. Member
**
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 77
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 13, 2017 at 10:15 AM Author: Xytrell
"Indeed, the specs is 10 Amps, 125 Volts as the embossed outline described"

Okay, if you insist on being pedantic, here we go.

The IEC c-13 female connector is rated up to 15A. The Nema 5-15 plug on the male end is rated up to 15A. The cable connecting the two is likely the bottle neck. It really depends. 20awg/0.5mm² is very rare, but 18awg/0.8mm² is common, which can carry between 10 and 16A safely, depending on the insulation used. The cables will occasionally have 16awg/1.3mm² or 14awg/2.1mm² which can carry up to 18A and 25A (with 90C insulation, but perhaps more commonly 12A and 15A) respectively.

I stand by my statement, that's a standard Nema 5-15 plug, which is rated for 15A. You could try and split hairs again, saying you're referring to the entire LEAD and not just the plug, but that clearly wasn't what the picture was designed to show.
Ash
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Posts: 3204
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Oct 13, 2017 at 10:55 AM Author: Ash
Actually, 0.5mm2 and 0.75mm2 are the 2 most common nowadays - and thats from the good manufacturers. (The bad stuff can go as low as 0.2..0.3 and that is allready unsafe to use on 16A breaker)

The safe current for them in PVC insulation is something like 5A and 7.5A respectively

The plug, allthough it is moulded, is still a component in its own right, no different to a plug which can be disassembled by screws. The same plug with the same 15A rating could be installed on an 1.5mm2 lead and that would hold the full 15A
© 2005-2017 Lighting-Gallery.net | Powered by: Coppermine Photo Gallery