Return to the thumbnail page Display/hide file information See previous file See next file

Strange particles under the lower part of the tube of my Hyundai TEVA 20W E27 WW CFL

Strange particles under the lower part of the tube of my Hyundai TEVA 20W E27 WW CFL

Click to view full size image

My discover of these particles in this specific CFL is very important because of the following reason:
This lamp pictured here, is my Hyundai TEVA/HY Amalgam, in which Semicom Lexis, advertises its as "Liquid mercury free" or even "HG free".
If these particles, will turned out to be drops of liquid mercury, here i have an evidence that Semicom Lexis, big lies, and lamps that are dosed with amalgam, still contains some liquid mercury (Or this lamp isn't dosed with amalgam at all).
One thing that is important, is that these particles aren't rolls, when i move the lamp.

IMG_1014~0.JPG IMG_1009.JPG IMG_1001~0.JPG IMG_0988.JPG

File information

File information

Download: Download this File
Filename:IMG_1001~0.JPG
Album name:dor123 / Light bulbs (Lamps)
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:132 KB
Date added:Nov 25, 2011
Dimensions:2048 x 1536 pixels
Displayed:147 times
URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-60249
Favorites:Add to Favorites
Comments
dor123
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2573
View Gallery
Other loves are computers, office equipment, A/Cs


View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Nov 25, 2011 at 09:26 AM Author: dor123
Are these particles drops of liquid mercury?

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

Ash
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Posts: 3723
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Nov 25, 2011 at 09:37 AM Author: Ash
Could be mercury, the other metal from the amalgam (after the mercury left it), amalgam, pieces of the cathode, or foreign objects that got in during manufacture (given the moderate quality of the lamp)
James
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 155
View Gallery


View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Nov 25, 2011 at 03:32 PM Author: James
The spots you see here could quite possibly be condensed droplets of liquid mercury – but that does not mean that the lamp was not made with amalgam. The only way to be sure is to take an X-Ray or break the lamp open and examine whether or not there is a remnant of the amalgam dosing vehicle left behind as well.

The whole dosing with amalgam for environmental reasons is something that a few companies are making a lot of noise about in recent times, but a lot of their arguments are flawed. Some of them go so far as to say that dosing with amalgam pellets is safer than liquid mercury, because if the lamp breaks, the mercury is contained as a safe solid pellet and does not escape as toxic vapour. If this was true, then how do you think mercury vapour can exist inside the lamp for the discharge to take place in!

The fact is that whether a lamp is dosed with amalgam or liquid mercury is really only a manufacturing consideration. In the vast majority of finished lamps there is no difference. This is because in a final manufacturing stage with amalgam lamps, the pellet is treated so as to vaporise its mercury dose out of the pellet. Thereafter, the mercury exists in pure liquid form in the lamp, just as though it had been dosed with liquid mercury in the first place - and you also have of course the left over empty pellet that once contained the mercury in amalgam form. This process of mercury release is necessary because otherwise, the lamp would take too long to run up when first switched on with the customer - it can often take several hours for the heat of the discharge to heat up the amalgam enough to vaporize enough mercury that the lamp will light at full output.

Once the mercury release process has been done, it will remain as liquid metal for a very long time indeed. If the lamp is broken, the mercury will be released just the same as a lamp that was dosed with the liquid metal. Over very long periods of time spent in cold storage, the mercury is progressively absorbed back into the amalgam pellet but it takes a long time. This occasionally causes problems with amalgam lamps that have been sitting in storage for years without being lit up – when they are eventually installed, they light up a dim pink and take too long to run up to full power.

The only fact that can sometimes make amalgam lamps more environmentally friendly than types dosed with liquid mercury is that it’s easier to dose low mercury weights with amalgams. When dosing with liquid mercury, it takes highly advanced lampmaking machinery to be able to reliably dose a small sized droplet. The less advanced factories may have a tolerance of as much as +/- 5mg on their mercury dosing stage – which means that of course, you can never make lamps with an average dose weight <5mg, otherwise production tolerances would mean that some lamps could be made with no mercury inside! (and this has happened, I know of a couple of amusing cases where manufacturers have simply reduced their mercury dose weight to comply with new legislation but missed the fact that it became less than their dosing tolerance, and shipped lamps with zero mercury content!) For the less advanced companies that cannot bring their liquid mercury dosing under control, amalgam dosing is the option they turn to. This way you can very easily control the tolerance of mercury dose weight to better than +/- 1mg, so the average dose weight can be reduced dramatically so as to comply with new legislation. However each of the big lampmakers has developed state of the art processes for dosing precisely and accurately a small quantity of liquid mercury, a considerably cheaper approach than resorting to amalgams. So it should by no means be taken as a general statement that amalgam lamps are always better!

Final important note – these facts do not refer to all mercury amalgams, only to those that are commonly used for lamp dosing purposes. Different amalgams are used in some lamps for other functions – for instance to ensure faster run-up or better lumen output at high temperatures. Some of these metals react more quickly with mercury and will form amalgams again very quickly after a lamp is switched off and cools down.
dor123
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2573
View Gallery
Other loves are computers, office equipment, A/Cs


View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Nov 25, 2011 at 03:50 PM Author: dor123
James: Thank you very much!!! Semicom Lexis, you are out of the game! I will never buy CFLs that states themselves as "liquid mercury free" or "HG free" anymore, especially not from Semicom Lexis (Which i already declared a boycott on them [Regarding of their Hyundai brandsticker of course]), who started this trend in Israel.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

Medved
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4315
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Nov 25, 2011 at 03:56 PM Author: Medved
It may well be even remains of the pellet - by it's initiation it explode, sending pieces of the molten "carry" metal (it may be even mix of metals, what remain liquid on the lamp operating temperature) all around the tube in the form of small globules (or droplets, in case the "carrier" alloy is liquid). And these globules you then see running around the tube, looking similar as the mercury.
In order to figure out, you would have to first check, if they are liquid droplets, or only solid balls (in both cases they would run along the tube, but in case they are liquid, they may join into bigger droplets), even on freezing temperatures.
Mercury would stay liquid all the time, (most of) other metals and alloys are either already solid, or they solidify at least on freezing temperatures.
And to be really sure, you would have to break the tube and chemically analyze the content...

From the picture in my opinion the dots look as too irregular shapes to be of any liquid, but it is hard to tell from such single still picture.

No more selfballasted c***

dor123
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2573
View Gallery
Other loves are computers, office equipment, A/Cs


View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Nov 25, 2011 at 04:08 PM Author: dor123
In addition to the black dots under the lower part of the spiral, there are much less visible and smaller dots onto them, which i"m sure that they are drops of liquid merucry.
Btw, i also saw liquid mercury in my father Philips Genie 13W(?)/865 tubular CFL, despite that Philips CFLs also dosed with an amalgam.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

© 2005-2019 Lighting-Gallery.net | Powered by: Coppermine Photo Gallery