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3-way 2D stuck in preheat

3-way 2D stuck in preheat

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Apparently when this lamp is hot and you go from 38W down to 12W it doesn't like that and the lamp wont start up, medium setting wont worl either, but putting it on high I'll come back on, or let it cool down and it works normally again
The ballast only seems to give it OCV once then gives up

ZedusaTempImage_zed20140822_112606_70p.jpg ZedusaTempImage_zed20140822_112808_70p.jpg 20140302_015040.jpg 20140111_182320.jpg

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Filename:20140302_015040.jpg
Album name:Alights / CFL
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:271 KB
Date added:Mar 09, 2014
Dimensions:1537 x 2050 pixels
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Brendda75
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LOVE my 8' slimline!!


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Mar 09, 2014 at 06:41 PM Author: Brendda75
I have 10 of these lamps with the electronic programmed start ballasts and I hope that they will last!

Love dresses, make-up and just crazy about fluorescent lighting!!  Keep those T12's and magnetic ballasts alive!!

Medved
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Mar 21, 2014 at 12:48 PM Author: Medved
The lamp is fixed with the ballast or detachable?

For the starts: Many of these 3-way ballasts are dimmed without any feedback, to Medium just by blind increase of the frequency and to Low by operating the input rectifier as a bridge instead of a doubler. The consequence is, the resonance frequency could be above the operating frequency and so the OCV becomes too low to ignite the lamp.

No more selfballasted c***

Flurofan96
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Aug 23, 2014 at 02:32 AM Author: Flurofan96
looks like magnetic ballast to me

I will give LEDisease a taste of my shoe

Medved
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Aug 23, 2014 at 06:51 AM Author: Medved
"3-way" is possible only with electronic...
With magnetic you would need, beside two ballast chokes, extra two relays, to make sure eventual multiple lamps on the same switch do not interfere with each other. But that would be way too complicated and large/heavy, mainly for such adaptor...

No more selfballasted c***

Alights
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USA (120V 60HZ)


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Aug 23, 2014 at 08:50 AM Author: Alights
Indeed a lightweight electronic ballast inside, the base and lamp separate from each other which is nice..
I suppose a tapped choke could be used on smaller lamps for 2 way lamps but having all 3 probably wouldn't be easily possible with a magnetic balalst
Medved
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Aug 23, 2014 at 11:29 AM Author: Medved
When you build a single lamp (let's say preheat) fixture with two switches on it, it is easy too: You split the full current into two parts (e.g. 30 and 70%) and use separate ballast choke for each part (designed to deliver that current) and control each of them by one switch. It is, because when you have just one lamp behind the switches, you don't care, if e.g. on "Low" the ballast circuit put some voltage on the other side of the "Med" switch or vice versa. But if multiple such ballast would be connected behind the common switches, the individual ballasts would interfere with each other via the connection behind the swith in OFF position.
And that is the case for the 3-way lamps as well: They should be designed to allow multiple lamps behind common switches.

Tapped choke would need relays as well, if it should be controlled like these 3-way lamps: The lamp design should be made so, there is no current path from one line input to the other one at all (without going to the neutral first).

With the two filament incandescent and/or two electrrically separate lamps, it is easy: Each of them is connected between it's line input and neutral.
But the thing becomes tricky when you are ging to supply a single lamp with it (and e.g. vary it's power), you need some means to make sure it will get power from either line input, but yet without the current path.
With the electronic it is not difficult: As the first thing the ballast do with the input mains is to rectify it. And there the diodes in the rectifirr make sure, there is no current path from one line input to the other (always at least one diode is blocking it).

But things like diodes could not be used with an AC powered magnetic ballast, therefore you would need something else to redirect the power to one common internal line and then control the lamp power (e.g. switch the individual chokes), so the relays.
Actually it would need one DPDT and one SPST relay. The control coil of each relay is connected to "it's" line input. One contact of the DPDT switch over the power from the other line to it's own line:
Assume the DPDT is on e.g. L2. When L2 is not energized, the "internal line" is connected to L1, If the L2 get power, it reconnect it to the L2. Then the remaining contacts switch each one it's ballast coil.
So when just L1 get power ("Low"), the L1 relay get's energized and turn it's ballast choke (the low current one) to the internal phase. As the L2 is not energized, the internal phase is connected via the L2 relay to the L1 and so get power from there, so the lamp lights only via the L1 choke.

When just the L2 gets power ("Medium"), it's relay get activated and reconnect the internal line to the L2 input and connect the second (higher current) ballast choke to it, so the lamp is ballasted via that choke.

When both lines are energized ("High"), the internal line is connected to the L2, so all the power goes from there, and as both relays are activated, both ballast coils are connected in parallel, so the lamp get the sum of both currents. All the currents come from L2, the L1 feed just it's relay control coil, so no path between L1 and L2, as required.

Well, with all that I still neglected one important thing: The lamp in a preheat circuit would most likely not start, if the preheat would not happen at full current, so actually a third relay (controled by the starter current) would be necessary to connect both coils together, once the starter turns ON.

Or a RS ballast could be used to feed the filaments at low power, the L2 relay would redirect the power as before and the free relay contacts would be then connected to control lamp current (e.g. connect each one one capacitor in a HPF RS ballast)

Well, in any way, quite complicated arrangement...

No more selfballasted c***

streetlight98
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Mike McCann


GoL Mike McCann 88219189@N04/albums
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Aug 31, 2014 at 08:19 PM Author: streetlight98
With magnetic, in order to have "three-way" lighting, you can install three lamp linear fluorescent fixtures with the center lamp in each fixture on one switch and the outer lamps of each fixture all on a second switch. My school did that with 2X4 parabolic 18-cell troffers. They were once F40T12/RS but are now F32T8 programmed start electronic. That's the easiest way to do three way for fluorescent lol.

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

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