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2 Old Incadesent Bulbs,

2 Old Incadesent Bulbs,

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Taken at my friends house garage , he deals with 1950s 1960s steam and items like organs items, mechanics old railway stuff ETC> his house is full of interesting stuff, but i saw these in his garage and kitchen

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Album name:Fox Mantra / Other bulbs and Lighting stuff
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:247 KB
Date added:Nov 17, 2014
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Globe Collector
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Nov 17, 2014 at 10:22 PM Author: Globe Collector
The lamp on the right is a Chinese Repo Squirrel Cage lamp probably made by some crowd like Shanghai Rui Shi Electric, c2000-2014, the one on the left is a Squirrel Cage (Marine) Navigation (Port and Starboard) indicator lamp probably made by (British) Osram at Hammersmith or one of the midlands Thorn plants in the 1960's. The red phosphorus getter, (Thompsom's Getter) on the button rod is a bit of a giveaway.

The style of window with that single opening section, white powder coated aluminium extrusions and mitered corners is so unique to the U.K. this could only be in Wales, England, Scotland, Isle of Man or Nothern Ireland. The power outlet on the far right seconds this hunch!

What sort of lighting is used in this kitchen? It looks like colour 865, that would make you feel nice and cold with the coming of the winter solstice soon.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

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Nov 18, 2014 at 06:39 AM Author: rjluna2
Cool

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

Fox Mantra
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Nov 18, 2014 at 11:51 AM Author: Fox Mantra
@ globe collector he had LEDS Cool White fitted in the kitchen, i still moan at him for ripping out the Florescent fitting that was in the kitchen, but least he kept it in his Garage.

Techno, Lightning, PS3, Lights, Furry, Random bloke.

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Nov 18, 2014 at 04:55 PM Author: Globe Collector
They have that horrible blue pumpping peak of the earlier L.E.D. generations. He needs to get some more contemporary L.E.D.s where they have managed to get them on the black-body locus of the C.I.E. chart a lot better. (You now often see them is Shoplighters in trendy women's fashion shops.)

Here in Australia with a hot bushfire summer nearly upon us it would not matter, but in the U.K. with winter nearly there, I'd be shivering in the corner. It would be even worse if my back were up against that aluminium framed external door...

Tell me about those extruded aluminium doors and windows that seem to make the U.K. so unique (because you don't see them anywhere else). The extruded aluminium...is it one piece exposed to both the inside and outside? Does it conduct heat, like a heatsink from inside to outside? Is the glass double glazing?

I know they are fitted with windstop measures (little black brushes or felty like strips around the edges).

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

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Nov 18, 2014 at 05:02 PM Author: Danny
The windows and doors here are PVCU plastic Andrew. My ones are too. Most houses now are fitted with PVC doors and windows. You see some fitted with 70s/80s outside wood framed And inside Aliminium framed Windows. Yes these will be double glazed or even triple glazed. Im not clued up on windows and doors but there is loads of different types and styles. Even double glazed wood windows

Nice lamps foxy!!
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Nov 18, 2014 at 06:05 PM Author: Globe Collector
That's interesting Danny. It explains their thermal insulating properties then. Would not want to be anywhere near if a house was on fire though, P.V.C. burns to produce Phosgene, (COCl2) and these would contain a lot of P.V.C.

What is interesting about the window styles in the U.K., that despite there being many variants and sizes, there is one fairly unique property most of them have....either a long narrow opening part across the top which is hinged at the top or an opening section down one side that takes up about a quarter to a third of the total window area hinged at the side similar to what is depicted above.
The top opening version is not rally seen anywhere else in the world but variants of the side opening version are seen elsewhere but the U.K. versions still have that "something" I can't quite put my finger on that screams..."I.m in the U.K.!"

Why are these so popular? Is it low maintenance, good thermal insulating properties or both.
Some of the entrance doors are really quite ostentatiously ugly, but we have similar wooden versions here.

Have a look on Google Maps at the Melbourne Suburb of Taylors Lakes. No U.K. style windows and doors, but still its an architectural abortion....

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

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Nov 18, 2014 at 06:12 PM Author: Danny
Yes they do melt in fires which isnt good.

The doors are extremely strong too. If the police raid a property ive seen these doors completely absorb and take the impact of tje police hammer. If the panel units dont fall out during impact the door frame comes out. The old Aluminium ones with a wooden surround frame are even stronger they can take some force!

The top opener windows are seen as a fire hazard as you couldnt get out of them. I personally think a window with 2 top openers and a large glass sheet is much better than the side openers as you have blind spots. Also after 20 years or so you get the problem with the glass seals failing and inbetween the 2 glass sheets fills up with steam or condensation.

I think the top openers are more popular due to no blind spots and plastic struts in the way plus they are harder for burglars to clime in through... Some older ones have the glass beading on the outside so burglars just simply pop a wall paper scraper in between the frames and beading, lift the beading our Then simply lift the glass out and crawl in! My mate whos a window fitter told me that its now not allowed to fit windows that have the beading on the outside
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Nov 18, 2014 at 06:48 PM Author: Globe Collector
Interesting, I did not factor crime in...although it does exist of course!

We don't have much problem in my area with break and enters but there are a few speed freaks about and they can be quite dangerous. We also have plenty of bogans, particularly on Friday and Saturday nights after the pubs close that can come down the street like a tide of vandalism and noise..
Glad most of my lamps are in a shipping container....

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

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Nov 18, 2014 at 07:53 PM Author: sol
Here in North America, with the abundance of wood, it was the material of choice for windows and doors. Nowadays, most windows and doors have a PVC frame. They are typically reinforced with metal inside the cavity, especially the door frames. They come in all shapes imaginable. Most are called "hung" windows, where two sashes are installed one on top of the other, and overlapping in the centre. The fancier ones are called 'double hung' as both sashes are 'hung' meaning the lower one can be lifted to open it, or the top one can be lowered as well. Less expensive ones have the top sash fixed and only the bottom sash opens up and they are called 'single hung'.

The other most popular type is the casement which is hinged on one side and opens towards the outside, or its cousin the awning window on the same principle only hinged from the top. Typically a crank-gear-arm mechanism is used to open and close such windows. This allows operation of the window without removing the insect screen from the inside frame.

As for extruded aluminium, they are used extensively in commercial applications. My university has them for retrofit in older buildings as well as in new construction. The oldest building is a wooden structure of four storeys built in 1899. No two windows are alike. The supplier used a large room in the basement as a temporary factory in which they mitre-cut the extrusions and panes and fitted everything together after measuring individual windows. They are double glazed, but the double panes are not sealed together. They are of the aforementioned double hung type and to open them, you open the inside pane first and then the outside pane.

The school where I teach has similar windows, but the insect screen is between the panes. To open, you first raise the inside pane, then the insect screen, then the outside pane, and lastly lower the insect screen. To close, you simply reverse. Most people leave the outside window open all the time and only open and close the inside one. This makes the inside window all dirty with outside dust and rain, and is way less efficient in the cold winter... I am meticulous about mine and always close them properly...
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Nov 18, 2014 at 08:26 PM Author: Globe Collector
Nearly all the windows in my house are of the "Double Hung" type. These were traditionally very common in Australia but only on older sturctures.
The windows in my house are fabricated from "Oregon Pine", from the United States State of Oregon none the less. The coniferous tree probably has a different name there and just a generic term was used here, It is quite a pinkey orange timber with the grain quite widely set, so fairly fast growing. It was used as ballast in sailing ships sailing from the U.S. to Tasmania, not sure what sort of cargo went back, probably apples. This was between about 1840 and 1920.

Just after the war (WW-II) the Government had thousands of "War Reberation" houses built, these were quite small and had smaller versions of the double hung windows.
By the 1960's our windows started to look somewhat like U.K. windows with large pane sections and opening sections, usually hinged at the top. Some had winder mechanisms to open them most had timber frames. Double glazing is rare here, even now.

At my former University some of the older buildings (1950s) had windows with steel frames, like you commonly see in South Africa but the 1960's buildings had aluminium frames. These are quite corroded now. In the 1970's the aluminium framed windows came with a vengeance, they had big panes, some slid open, must were as UGLY as Hell!

These days there are many types of windows but most are mass produced. No skilled carpentry in the Uni basement anymore...

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

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Nov 18, 2014 at 08:53 PM Author: sol
You could get (and can still get for $$$$$$$) quality wooden framed windows here in just about any style. The best use red cedar. Properly maintained, they last a long time. In the 1970's trough the 1990's, the popular wooden windows were white pine, which is abundant and inexpensive. They did not last, were very prone to leaking in windy rainy weather, and finally were rotting quite badly. They are now replaced with vinyl mostly.

My elementary school had the awning type (hinged at the top, swinging outwards) and instead of a crank, they had a lever with linkage arms to open and close. The lever would travel 180 degrees to fully open. The operating panes were quite large, about four feet wide and three feet tall. The slightest frost combined with a too swift movement to open them resulted in the lever snapping off. There was no choice but to replace the entire mechanism as it was not serviceable. All in all it was a bad design. Most levers were replaced at some point. The school was built in 1974 and in 2002 they replaced the (rotten) windows. Out of about 60 windows, only about 10 had the original lever. They were replaced with aluminium windows similar to the ones I described above.
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Nov 19, 2014 at 07:09 AM Author: Fox Mantra
wow lights to doors hehe, that kitchen door goes into his Garage that door, his house has stuff everywhere from his work place also has an ALGA oven the old style wood burning ovens and hobs behind him in the photo, also his loft is getting a refit, last 2-3 years been doing his bungalow up for him self, Yep it is defiantly in the UK Globe Collector ^^

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Nov 19, 2014 at 07:18 AM Author: Danny
So do you guys over the pond not have PVCU or Aluminium framed Windows? Do yous have double / tripple glazed windows?
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Nov 19, 2014 at 12:06 PM Author: FrontSideBus
Mine are steel reinforced PVC. with 5 point locking systems. Toughened glass made just down the road in St Helens (famous for it's float glass) which survived when I threw a hammer at it once in a drunken rage

UK out of the EU!
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Nov 19, 2014 at 12:15 PM Author: Beta 5
@FSB, looks like you will be nice and secure!
I could imagine you throwing a hammer at a window lol

Thorn Beta 5 35W SOX 1965 - 2008. Top entry/Side entry

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Nov 19, 2014 at 04:23 PM Author: Fox Mantra
The windows behind my freind are double glazzed yep, when he moved in they wernt they were old 1960s single rusting away things,

Techno, Lightning, PS3, Lights, Furry, Random bloke.

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