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General Electric Blue Christmas Light

General Electric Blue Christmas Light

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General Electric inside silica wet-powder coated opaque blue coated C7 Christmas light.

P5130336.JPG P5130339.JPG P5130337.JPG P5110103~0.JPG

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:General Electric
Lamp
Lamp Type:Inside Silica Wet-Powder Coated Opaque Blue
Base:Candelabra Edison Screw (E12)
Shape/Finish:C7
Electrical
Wattage:7 Watts
Voltage:120 Volts
Physical/Production
Factory Location:USA
Fabrication Date:1951/52
Application/Use:Christmas Light

File information

File information

Download: Download this File
Filename:P5130337.JPG
Album name:rjluna2 / C7 Christmas/Night/Indicators Light Bulbs
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:138 KB
Date added:Jul 18, 2010
Dimensions:764 x 839 pixels
Displayed:231 times
Date Time:2010:05:13 19:14:38
DateTime Original:2010:05:13 19:14:38
Exposure Bias:0 EV
Exposure Time:1/20 sec
FNumber:f 3.1
Flash:No Flash
Focal length:6.3 mm
ISO:125
Make:OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.
Model:FE210,X775
Software:1.0
White Balance:0
URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-46181
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Comments
bluminator71
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Mar 27, 2012 at 01:22 PM Author: bluminator71
Nice bulb; the standard typeface GE etch was made before 1959. The meatball logo first appeared in 1959.

/Brad
rjluna2
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Mar 27, 2012 at 06:27 PM Author: rjluna2
So, in other words, this was made in between 1949-58?

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

bluminator71
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Apr 18, 2012 at 12:16 PM Author: bluminator71
Yes, it was definitely made around that time period; I have some of these inside translucent finish bulbs in different colors myself.; the GE shades of color are lighter on these bulbs than the regular glazed coatings most common on these bulbs. This special paint on the insides of these GE C-7's are rare.
rjluna2
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Apr 18, 2012 at 12:44 PM Author: rjluna2
Thanks for the dating information I have added this to the Light Information.

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

bluminator71
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Jun 04, 2012 at 10:46 PM Author: bluminator71
@rjluna2: As an update, these inside powder-coated bulbs were only made for two years, 1949-1950, and dropped in favor of the glazed ceramic finish.
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Jun 05, 2012 at 05:21 AM Author: rjluna2
Curiously, this one does not have the brass base Edison Screw

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

bluminator71
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Jun 05, 2012 at 10:38 AM Author: bluminator71
Yeah, I noticed that too; I wonder if this one was a fluke or maybe was made with an aluminum base by accident. The blue looks like a dark shade or is that because of the light. You may have a VERY rare bulb due to this one being made with an aluminum Edison base!

/Brad
rjluna2
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Jun 09, 2012 at 03:55 PM Author: rjluna2
I also have non-brass version with inside powder-coated ceramic bulb on the left posted at Evolution of General Electric Orange Christmas Lights

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

bluminator71
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Jun 09, 2012 at 08:39 PM Author: bluminator71
Nice bulbs!! It's possible that the 1949 powder coated bulbs could have been made with the brass Edison bases and the 1950 bulbs were made with aluminum Edison bases. That might be another clue what year the bulb was made.
rjluna2
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Jun 10, 2012 at 12:46 PM Author: rjluna2
I was going over the internet last night and found that the aluminium base cap were switched over at 1951. I may be wondering if this was made before switching over to the ceramic glass mixed envelope.

I'll update this page accordingly

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

Lumalux
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Dec 28, 2012 at 12:17 PM Author: Lumalux
I also am confounded by the timeline of GE production of the inside coated versus the ceramic lamps. I have the older inside coated C7s with both brass and aluminum bases - all with the old G-E stamp. However, I also have older ceramic C7s with the brass base which was later switched to aluminum. So I am confused about the apparent crossover. Does anyone have the timeline on the characteristics of the GE Christmas C7s?
bluminator71
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Dec 28, 2012 at 01:44 PM Author: bluminator71
@Lumalux: To the best of my knowledge, the Brass bases were switched over to aluminum in 1951. It's possible that there were many, many brass bases that came off the assembly line and weren't yet assembled to the glass envelopes when the brass to aluminum changover occured. That could account for some of your GE ceramic glazed bulbs to have brass bases on them too, thus the crossover. The silica wet-powder inside coatings were discontinued beginning in 1952, when the glazed ceramic coatings started being manufactured on the bulbs. They carried over the G-E block etch until 1959, when the "meatball" GE logo etch first appeared on the bulb finishes.
Lumalux
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Dec 28, 2012 at 01:53 PM Author: Lumalux
Thanks, bluminator! That makes sense. I have not come across many of the glazed bulbs with the brass bases.

The inside coated c7s are hard to find. When you do find them, many don't work anymore.

I was the lucky recipient of about 30 of these bulbs for Christmas (thanks Santa!). I also had a lucky find of 6 or 7 working inside coated c7s from a local thrift store.

Of all Christmas lights, the inside coated c7s and the GE/Mazda swirl c9s are far and away the best. The workmanship of the bulbs, their durability, and the resulting color are outstanding. A great memory of Christmases long ago!

If I was crazy rich, I would have these bulbs manufactured once again, exactly as they were 50-60 years ago. I'm sure I could find some buyers.
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Dec 28, 2012 at 11:16 PM Author: bluminator71
Yeah, I have managed to accumulate around 125 of the inside coated c-7's that work; I'm still looking for more of these. I'd like to decorate the tree with these one year.
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Jan 10, 2013 at 05:27 PM Author: Lumalux
A whole tree of 100-125 inside coated C7s would be heaven!

I don't have 125 yet but I'm getting there. I may have that many Mazda swirls that work, and certainly hundreds of the later ceramic C7s and C9s.

If you do decide to light an entire tree with vintage lamps, I suggest you devise a method to drop the voltage to about 90 percent to help preserve their lives. I have created many what I call "roadie boxes" -- essentially electrical two-gang handy boxes with a dimmer and duplex outlet with a flexible lead cord running to it. You'd probably need a high wattage 1000 watt dimmer to handle the vintage lamps (7 watts x 100 = 700 watts). Conventional dimmers top out at 600 watts in a single gang box. You could split the circuit in two to reduce load on the dimmers. Plus, it's always fun to play with a dimmer!
rjluna2
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Jan 10, 2013 at 08:47 PM Author: rjluna2
I was re-reading your comments here again and I have updated the Light Information. (With thanks of Brad [bluminator71]) Could this be one of the rarer switchover between the brass cap and ceramic mixed glass envelope that I have in this collection?

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

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Jan 10, 2013 at 09:24 PM Author: Lumalux
I think it's rare. Most have the earlier brass bases. The aluminum bases are usually found on the ceramic/glaze lamps. I do have a few of these, purchased from the same source, so they were probably originally bought at the same time.
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