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POWER FREQUENCY

POWER FREQUENCY

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WTF? Why it's slowly 50Hz??

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Date added:Feb 19, 2019
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Date Time:2019:02:19 15:52:46
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Lightingguy1994
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Feb 19, 2019 at 10:19 AM Author: Lightingguy1994
Mine is 59.9hz
mima
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Feb 21, 2019 at 04:50 AM Author: mima
0.05 Hz of difference is nothing to worry about. It's just impossible to have the mains frequency precisely locked at 50 (or 60) Hz because it depends by the balance between electrical production and consumption over an area of thousands and thousands of square kilometers/miles. If the frequency is above the nominal value that means that there's a bit of overproduction (the power plants rotary generators are less loaded so they rotate a bit faster), if it's below that means that there's a bit of overconsumption (this time the generators have to cope with more load, so they slow down a bit). It's just physical laws at work.

Frequency can sway of about +/- 0.5 Hz from the nominal 50 or 60 Hz value without causing problems, eventually the electromechanical clocks which rely on syncronous motors to move their mechanism could accumulate some delay or ahead time compared to the correct hour. But if it sways more than this limit then problems to the electric grid can start to arise.

Look here for more information: http://www.mainsfrequency.com/
On that website you can also see the real-time measurement of the mains frequency over the whole european electric grid, where you can clearly notice that the frequency is not 100% stable. But as said before, this is perfectly normal.

Gimme a discharge lamp and a humming ballast Grin

dor123
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Feb 21, 2019 at 05:10 AM Author: dor123
My UPS software always displays 50hz, and I've never encountered main frequency variations.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

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Feb 21, 2019 at 06:38 AM Author: mima

My UPS software always displays 50hz, and I've never encountered main frequency variations.


Small UPSes for home or small office use and their software often are not so much precise in reporting the mains frequency, we're talking about variations way smaller than 0.5 Hz after all. This simply is not a requirement for such appliances and manufacturers don't care about the frequency measure being so precise on these lines of products. Usually (but not always) higher level of precision is found in enterprise grade UPSes.

Small frequency variations are simply unavoidable on the big scale where the eletricity plants and distribution networks operate, the fact that an UPS software doesn't show/measure them doesn't mean that they're not there. Actually, if your electricity supplier/national grid company have a website with a page where the network's mains frequency is being measured, I'm pretty sure you'll see some variations.

This for example is the frequency measure page of Swissgrid, which is the Switzerland's owner and operator of the national electric grid:
https://www.swissgrid.ch/en/home/operation/grid-data/current-data.html

As you can see from the graph and the real-time measure reported there, there's definitely some small variation in frequency, and this is pretty normal for a system of a such big scale.

Gimme a discharge lamp and a humming ballast Grin

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