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I find two different lead in wires

I find two different lead in wires

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I took this shot for Globe Collector as something interesting about
the main lead support wires
One of them is thick coppery looking leads and the other one have silvery thinner main lead
As i have bit few examples to compare to.

image~105.jpg image~104.jpg image~103.jpg image~102.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Hygrade
Lamp
Lamp Type:Tungsten incandescent
Filament/Radiator Type:S2
Base:E12
Electrical
Wattage:5 watts
Voltage:12 volts
Optical
Color Rendering Index:100 cri
Physical/Production
Factory Location:Danvers , Massachusetts

File information

File information

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Filename:image~103.jpg
Album name:funkybulb / Incandescent lamps
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Keywords:Lamps
File Size:323 KB
Date added:Mar 01, 2014
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migette1
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Peter


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Mar 01, 2014 at 07:46 AM Author: migette1
Hi copper could be dumet type and the silver one platinum which has a similar expansion as glass, 2 nice examples.

Interested in the history of electric lighting and incandescent in particular and neon glow lamps.

Silverliner
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Verd a ray classic.


GoL
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Mar 01, 2014 at 01:47 PM Author: Silverliner
Do they have different numbers on the stem press?

May all the great lighting technologies have their place in history.

Administrator of Lighting-Gallery.net. Need help? PM me.

ricksbulbs
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Aug 06, 2015 at 07:59 PM Author: ricksbulbs
The thicker lead-ins are earlier, the thinner ones are later. Also, the shape of the stem press indicates this. The thicker lead in lamp on the left is circa 1910-1912. The thinner lead in one on the right is between 1913 and 1917. By 1918, the filaments were mostly the more compact V shaped, and by 1916 many were also coiled, though straight wire filaments were used into the early '20's as well! most, but not all of the more compact later V filaments were coiled, and the straight wire ones tended to be much taller---nearly to the top of the bulb to the center of the V. Also, the straight wire lamps often had the straight wire V filament "folded" over to one side, forming 2 loops and the crease of the V being down alongside the stem press, anchored to the same with a short support wire out the side of the stem press looping around the V crease. This was used between about 1915 and 1919, and in 1918, many of the miniature automotive type lamps, huge users of this folded V filament (which looks kind of like a 1 support C-7A filament, or shall I correctly say "S-7A"? And I have both exhaust tipped and tipless versions of 6-8 volt car bulbs with straight wire folded V filaments, some as late as 1921 or 1922, but most between 1915 and 1920. So after 1916, you can see both straight wire and coiled filaments, but straight wire was still used in type "B" vacuum line voltage lamps up to about 1920. Coiled line voltage filaments were standard on gas filled MAZDA GLS lamps and some miniature lamps since about 1915-16. Vacuum GLS bulbs got coiled filaments at the tail end of the "S" shaped bulb era--abut 1920-21, and than the "A" shape with coiled C-7A and C-9 filaments became the norm. Cheers! Rick "C-6" Delair!
funkybulb
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Aug 06, 2015 at 08:57 PM Author: funkybulb
Thank you for more detail on these lamps
I am learning more about early lighting. I
Had a feeling there at least 100 years old.
One thing about these lamp they also dont
like over voltage very well either. I ran this
Up in my solar powered shop, ran them on voltage regulated power supply of 10 volt tap.

No LED gadgets, spins too slowly.  Gotta  love preheat and MV. let the lights keep my meter spinning.

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