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Sylvania F14T12/R (1974)

Sylvania F14T12/R (1974)

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This beautiful NOS lamp was generously donated to me by ultralume. This is the first Red fluorescent lamp I've ever seen, and I have to say, it's quite a color. Not very bright (I think I once read that Red is the least efficient of the fluorescent lamp colors), but the color is brilliant, a deep, crimson red. I photoshopped this to try and make the color more realistic, but the photo still doesn't do it justice.

As you can see, Red is one of the few colors that employ a colored coating over the phosphor, making this lamp look cool, even when it's off! Anyone know what phosphor is used underneath? I would assume pink?

Can anyone date this for me?

IMG_1289.JPG IMG_1257.JPG IMG_1241_2.jpg IMG_1213.JPG

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Sylvania
Model Reference:F14T12-R
Lamp
Lamp Type:F14T12
Electrical
Wattage:14
Optical
Color Temperature:Red
Physical/Production
Factory Location:USA
Fabrication Date:November 1974

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Album name:themaritimegirl / Fluorescent lamps
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:154 KB
Date added:Jun 01, 2014
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TheUniversalDave1
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Jun 01, 2014 at 05:36 PM Author: TheUniversalDave1
My oldest lamps are some 1954 Sylvania F40/D. I removed them from the halfpipes that I almost had. EOL, unfortunately, one of the reasons I don't really like preheat for larger lamps. If they had been on rapid start, they may still be good.

"If people only knew how much I secretly hated them, they'd love me for holding it in." -Matt Groening

rjluna2
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Robert


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Jun 01, 2014 at 06:30 PM Author: rjluna2
Nice, Trent

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

themaritimegirl
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themaritimegirl themaritimegirl themaritimegirl
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Jun 01, 2014 at 06:36 PM Author: themaritimegirl
Thanks Robert! Tomorrow's pic will be the Green lamp!

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jercar954
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Jun 01, 2014 at 07:56 PM Author: jercar954
This lamp is from 11/74 as it has 70's style end caps.

Preheat and T-12 fluorescents forever! Down with LED's and instant start T-8 fluorescents.

themaritimegirl
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Jun 01, 2014 at 08:03 PM Author: themaritimegirl
Thanks!

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jonathon.graves johng917 GeorgiaJohn
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Jun 02, 2014 at 11:34 AM Author: DieselNut
@TheUniversalDave1, Why do you not like preheat for "larger lamps"? Preheat is actually best for lamp life on fixtures that are turned on once a day and left on all day (8 to 10 hours per start or longer), as they only heat the cathodes while the starter is closed, then no more after it opens/lamp strikes. Rapid start heats them the whole time the power is applied and we all know how instant start can ruin a lamp...

Preheat Fluorescents forever!
I love diesel engines, rural/farm life and vintage lighting!

TheUniversalDave1
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Jun 02, 2014 at 11:48 AM Author: TheUniversalDave1
Well for one thing, rapid start has a way cooler startup than preheat on larger lamps. That's not to say that I would convert a vintage halfpipe or other art deco fixture from preheat to rapid start, I would rather consult someone on LG for a Universal 205-TC-P.

I was recently given a 2x20 watt striplight by TheMaritimeMan, and I put in a preheat choke and a trigger start. That way, I get the best of both worlds.

"If people only knew how much I secretly hated them, they'd love me for holding it in." -Matt Groening

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jonathon.graves johng917 GeorgiaJohn
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Jun 02, 2014 at 12:39 PM Author: DieselNut
Personally, I prefer the startup of preheat much better than rapid start (which I do also like) because each tube has its own startup "personality". Four tubes all starting up independently are much more interesting than four tubes starting up in pairs of two each...which is still MUCH more interesting than boring HF instant start.

Preheat Fluorescents forever!
I love diesel engines, rural/farm life and vintage lighting!

TheUniversalDave1
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Jun 02, 2014 at 01:01 PM Author: TheUniversalDave1
I think it depends on what you grew up with. When I was very young, rapid start was everywhere. I remember being fascinated by the way the outside lamps of a troffer would start, then milliseconds later, the inside lamps would start. And vise-versa. That signature rapid start startup flicker is what got my attention.

"If people only knew how much I secretly hated them, they'd love me for holding it in." -Matt Groening

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themaritimegirl themaritimegirl themaritimegirl
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Jun 02, 2014 at 02:08 PM Author: themaritimegirl
Dieselnut, I've been told that rapid start provides better lamp life than preheat, in any and all applications?

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TheUniversalDave1
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Jun 02, 2014 at 02:20 PM Author: TheUniversalDave1
That's what I am aware of also.

"If people only knew how much I secretly hated them, they'd love me for holding it in." -Matt Groening

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jonathon.graves johng917 GeorgiaJohn
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Jun 02, 2014 at 04:35 PM Author: DieselNut
The argument has been made many times on the gallery and forums here. Rapid start (and programmed start) is best for frequently switched applications. Preheat has an advantage in constant on and long time on applications (like I mentioned above, with 6-8+ hours or more per start) because if all things being equal, the rapid start constantly heats the cathodes (drawing part of the ballast's power) and the preheat ballast cuts off cathode heating after initial start. I would say the difference is minimal in tube life. I know putting a preheat or instant start light in a bathroom with a motion sensor or wall switch is just murder to tubes, but in an office or warehouse setting, I would say preheat has the advantage of lumens per watt and tube life. The demise of preheat in USA is probably more because of lack of good maintenance more than anything. EOL tubes lead to stuck starters and ruined ballasts.

Preheat Fluorescents forever!
I love diesel engines, rural/farm life and vintage lighting!

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Jun 02, 2014 at 05:01 PM Author: TheUniversalDave1
I'm not gonna argue with that logic.

"If people only knew how much I secretly hated them, they'd love me for holding it in." -Matt Groening

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Jun 02, 2014 at 07:23 PM Author: sol
I remember reading somewhere here that since in North America, 120 volts is not sufficient to reliably strike long lamps, an autotransformer is needed, that adds to the complexity of the ballast anyway and adding small windings for electrode heating is not much more work and makes for a ballast that is not much more complicated or expensive to produce. In the long run, for ballast and fixture makers, the addition of electrode heating windings makes for a less expensive option than a starter socket and starter. Of course, all the reasons explained by DieselNut above also contributed to the demise of preheat in North America.

As for preferred start method, I prefer preheat myself, but then I would argue that all of North America should have upgraded to 220 volts mains at the same time Europe upgraded and European style switch start would be the norm here as well...
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jonathon.graves johng917 GeorgiaJohn
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Jun 04, 2014 at 06:09 AM Author: DieselNut
I agree with you there sol!

Preheat Fluorescents forever!
I love diesel engines, rural/farm life and vintage lighting!

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