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Unusual "Cool Green" CFL

Unusual "Cool Green" CFL

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Came across this 26w CFL with a bizarre green color while at work today, what you see in the photo is actually a good representation of the actual color this was. It looked very similar to a clear MV. This was in a hallway of an office building which was lit entirely with these recessed cans using mostly older 6500K GE CFL's, which was also what the lamp in question was. What do you think might have caused this unusual color? Only thing I can think of is contamination in the tube somehow affecting the phosphor. This was the only lamp that was like this

20190111_174349.jpg FB_IMG_1544823557739.jpg 20181113_202539.jpg 20180806_231042.jpg

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Filename:20181113_202539.jpg
Album name:BlueHalide / New album
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:228 KB
Date added:Nov 13, 2018
Dimensions:2464 x 1848 pixels
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Date Time:2018:11:13 20:25:39
DateTime Original:2018:11:13 20:25:39
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Lightingguy1994
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Nov 13, 2018 at 11:32 PM Author: Lightingguy1994
Probably the result of a bad day at the phosphor processor at the plant. Or it is so old that the phosphors are worn down, though this is pretty extreme for that but its a cool find for sure, worth saving even. Perfect for a wallpack or bucket light to make it have that MV look and feel without the trouble
dor123
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Nov 14, 2018 at 02:54 AM Author: dor123
It is rare for triphosphor to degrade to a cool green color. I think it is a production malfunction.
Degrading of triphosphor is usually a drop of the color temperature of the lamp, since the blue component degrades faster than the green and the red components (6500K becomes 5000K, 4000K becomes 3500K, etc...)
Also, from the picture I've seen that the afterglow of the phosphor is green. Apparently, they only put the blue and the green components, but forgot to put the red component, resulting in a cool green light,
Some Chinese generic CFLs, may employ different phosphor than the usual triphosphor (Daylight halophosphors is the most common case I encountered, and my Georgian AQ-Light 15W CFL is an example).

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

suzukir122
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Nov 14, 2018 at 04:45 AM Author: suzukir122
Added to all this, that is some very strong afterglow I'm seeing here, as if something is defective inside the lamp, it's being ran on
some sort of magnetic ballast (doubtful) or it's on a dimming circuit...? Normally compact fluorescent lamps don't exhibit noticeable hertz flicker
like this.

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dor123
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Nov 14, 2018 at 04:57 AM Author: dor123
Electronic ballasts can have 120hz if the electrolytic capacitor is failed.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

Lightingguy1994
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Nov 14, 2018 at 01:16 PM Author: Lightingguy1994
What if the lamp is overdriven because ballast is failing
dor123
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Nov 14, 2018 at 01:34 PM Author: dor123
Electronic ballasts don't have lamp overdriving failure like magnetic ballasts.
Also, fluorescent lamp can get this color from overdriving only if they are severally overdriven on purpose.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

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Nov 14, 2018 at 04:13 PM Author: BlueHalide
Until you guys brought it up, I hadnt realized this lamp may be operating at lower than normal frequency given the "banding" in the photograph. You typically only see that with magnetic 50/60Hz gear, not HF electronic like this. Im curious as to why this is, and if it may have something to do with the odd color. The lamp didnt appear to flicker at all. Next time im at this customer, ill be sure to replace this lamp and take it home
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Nov 14, 2018 at 04:27 PM Author: Lightingguy1994
Was it brighter than normal? Im wondering if its been over driven some how, over time anyway and it made the phosphors do that, kind of like how LEDs get green after heavy usage. I have some heavily used F40/D that are slightly more greenish than their less used counterparts. Also coated MV comes to mind, where it glows red at startup when new, but not after its worn...
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Nov 14, 2018 at 04:48 PM Author: BlueHalide
It appeared about normal brightness, I am familiar with how some daylight fluorescents get a slight green hue after very long use past rated life, I dont think this is the case, it was just way too green to be from degrading phosphor over lamp life, this is also a CFL running base up in a recessed can, youre lucky to get 8000 hours out of them in this application given the heat and lack of air flow around the ballast/base.
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Nov 14, 2018 at 04:50 PM Author: Lightingguy1994
True! Hope you can get it soon, no matter the cause, it sure is a keeper
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Nov 14, 2018 at 08:51 PM Author: BlueHalide
Yes, ill be sure to. I wasnt there that day to relamp these cans, but theyll probably be calling again soon as I noticed quite a few dead lamps throughout the building.

As stupid as it sounds, im sorta nostalgic about CFL's, back when I started my training as an electrician CFL's were all the rage and they really rekindled my interest in lighting, particularly when ide relamp an entire building from incandescent/halogen to daylight CFL, everybody took notice as the change was super obvious. Now, today as I work with 99% LED, the lighting retrofit and relampings just dont really interest me anymore, the technology is just so mundane and boring. My company only has a small handful of clients left still using CFL, but they are quickly dwindling as the 4-5 year old lamps go EOL and LED's go in. My Boss only brings in LED now so thats the only option
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Nov 14, 2018 at 09:09 PM Author: Lightingguy1994
Yeah I hear you, CFLs helped me get started too, I remember I was very fascinated with the daylight ones after I seen one in use at someones house, but i was so inexperienced with lighting at the time I didn't know about the colour temperature thing and kelvins so when I bought my first CFLs I was disappointed that they were not daylight but I learned quickly the next time round when I went back to buy more and took the time to read the boxes.

Nowadays CFLs don't cut it for me anymore and they are getting difficult to find but I do have a good stash. As for LED, the only ones that have tickled my fancy are those filament ones. Mostly because they look like incandescent and the daylight ones are very interesting - look like incandescent but in daylight. The EOL is also kinda cool on these because they get dim and have partial discharge appearance which reminds me of fluorescent and HID. They also look very nice in a coated bulb. All other LED does not interest me
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Nov 14, 2018 at 09:14 PM Author: Lumex120
Eh, I'm nostalgic about CFL's too. I "grew up" with them and remember how fun it was watching them warm up.

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