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Various switchstart/preheat ballasts in the storage of Carmel hospital

Various switchstart/preheat ballasts in the storage of Carmel hospital

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The top one is Eltam for 20W T12, 18W T8 and TC-L and 26W TC-D, made in August 2010.
The middle one is Eltam for 40W/36W T12/T8 and two 20W/18W T12/T8, in series made in November 2011.
The bottom one is Shaingout for 15W T8.

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Album name:dor123 / Control gears
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Date added:Dec 22, 2011
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Date Time:2011:12:22 09:27:38
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Ash
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Dec 22, 2011 at 04:44 AM Author: Ash
The mid one is high efficiency ballast

It is larger than a standard L36 ballast, with way larger cross section of the magnetic core

It has lower power factor - which means that it is doing more of the ballasting magnetically and less by wire resistance

It heats 20C less than a standard ballast - 35C above ambient temperature, while the standard ballast is 55-60C. Expected with lower wire losses

It is rated B1 and not B2 in efficiency

The high efficiency magnetic ballasts are more reliable than normal ones, as they heat less (so no deterioration of plasic parts etc), and dont get damages by stuck starters and EOL lamps as fast as normal ballasts
rjluna2
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Dec 22, 2011 at 06:25 AM Author: rjluna2
The top ballast is made on August 2010. The middle one is the newest in the pack, October 2011. The bottom one is the oldest, 1997.

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

AZTECH
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Dec 22, 2011 at 11:53 AM Author: AZTECH
@ dor123,

Nice, I have almost same like yours but come from Philippines 230v and 60hz and even will work good in USA.
dor123
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Dec 23, 2011 at 01:09 AM Author: dor123
If your ballast is for 230V, it will be underdriven in 120V and will have different OCV and lamp current/voltage and may also be distroyed.
Unlike electronic ballast which allow operation on a wider ranges of rated voltages and frequencies, the rated voltage and frequency of the magnetic ballast must match the working voltage and frequency with limits of 10%. This not means that a 220V ballast suitable for Israel and Europe (230V), and a 230V suitable for the UK/Australia (240V). Same with the US.
Magnetic ballasts are far more sensitive to variations of the mains voltage than the electronic ballasts, because of this.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

AZTECH
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Dec 23, 2011 at 01:25 AM Author: AZTECH
@ don123,

I am not using one hot 120V to apply with 230V ballast but It will works fine with two hot 120V (240V total)
dor123
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Dec 23, 2011 at 01:41 AM Author: dor123
How you can connect two 120V outlets to the ballast to get nearly the same voltage as the rated voltage of you ballast?
Of course there is still 10% difference between your total voltage (240V) you made and your ballast rated voltage (230V).

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

AZTECH
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Dec 23, 2011 at 02:32 AM Author: AZTECH
@ dor123,

Here in USA all house come with 240volt 60Hz and I installed special outlet in my garage shop which it have 240V ready.
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Dec 23, 2011 at 03:10 AM Author: Medved
@dor123: In US the transformer is serving only one (or few homes). It have 240V center tapped secondary, where the center is grounded and form the Neutral. So to each home go 3 live wires: Two Phase and one Neutral. Normal 120V circuits are wired between one Phase and Neutral, while devices with high input power (heaters, AC,...) are connected between the two phase wires, so run on the 240V.
And as some wall socket circuits along the house are connected to one and other circuits to second phase wire, by combining two sockets you may get the full 240V. It work in the same way as in EU style "3-phase + Neutral" you may combine two sockets to get 400V.
Well, all that would work, unless there are RCD's (GFCI's) installed in the system (unless there is one common on the house input). They would miss the current in the corresponding Neutrals, so shut down.

No more selfballasted c***

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Dec 23, 2011 at 06:17 AM Author: Skiller
@ Ash When you say "standard ballast", are you referring to a B2 rated ballast or one without an EEI label (class C or D)?
I noticed myself as well that a B2 rated ballast stays significantly cooler than a 24 year old one which is probably class C.
I have been looking for B1 rated ballasts but failed to find any, plenty B2 everywhere though.
Ash
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Dec 23, 2011 at 07:53 AM Author: Ash
The upper ballast is B2 Eltam L series (formerly ECO series which did not have EEI label but it is the same ballast). The "normal" B2 36W ballast is the same size. This is what i call "standard" ballast

I have high efficiency Eltam 36/40W ballast from 93 - it does not have EEI label but is rated 430mA PF0.46 dt35 which is close to the ballast here, so i think they are of similar efficiency (the low power factor is a hint - it means that more ballasting is done magnetically and less by losses). The Perfekt Start ballasts also seem to be more efficient than the standard ballast, despite having a heating element that probably dissipates 1-2W or so

In the 80's and 90's Eltam's standard ballast was the Mini N which have power factor 0.5 - same as the ECO's, but for some reason heated a whole lot more - so maybe they actually were less efficient, with either the current or the power factor rating being inaccurate
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Dec 23, 2011 at 11:01 AM Author: Medved
Lower power factor for the same lamp type and the same lamp arc voltage mean there is less real power input for the same apparent power. And as the lamp output is linked to the circuit current, so apparent power.

This comparison (lower PF => higher efficiency; higher PF => lower efficiency) of course apply only for series choke ballasts without any power factor correction and with the same lamp type.

No more selfballasted c***

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Dec 23, 2011 at 12:01 PM Author: monkeyface
Untill the late 80's such single coil ballasts like these ones were very rare in Switzerland. Here most Fluorescent lamps were having double coil ballasts. Both coils were in parallel, meaning that you had to connect the live and neutral on to it and both lamp output too.
The sense behind this was to suppres the unwanted frequencies which would run back in to the powergrid.
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Dec 23, 2011 at 12:13 PM Author: Medved
@monkeyface: You mean both sections were in series...

No more selfballasted c***

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Dec 23, 2011 at 12:24 PM Author: monkeyface
Yes in the whole lamp circuit are the coils from the ballast in series! They are still made by Tridonic for the Swiss market but uncommon now.
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