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Philips 13 Watt PL-C

Philips 13 Watt PL-C

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New old stock ReStore find for $1.

File_May_04,_18_44_29.jpeg File_May_04,_18_45_03.jpeg File_May_04,_18_44_04.jpeg bulb8.JPG

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Philips
Model Reference:PL-C 13W/ 35
Lamp
Lamp Type:Compact Fluorescent
Base:GX23
Electrical
Wattage:13
Optical
Color Temperature:3500K
Physical/Production
Factory Location:Holland

File information

File information

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Filename:File_May_04,_18_44_04.jpeg
Album name:Mustang07 / Fluorescent Lamps
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:412 KB
Date added:May 04, 2015
Dimensions:1848 x 2465 pixels
Displayed:133 times
URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-108365
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HU112
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Chester


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May 05, 2015 at 08:56 AM Author: HU112
A PL lamp with standard /35-535 halophosphor ?
Rarely seen

No more cheapy crappy Chinese junk, please.

dor123
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May 05, 2015 at 09:36 AM Author: dor123
PLs and CFLs with standard halophosphors, are usually the cheap chinese ones.
Philips never made CFLs with halophosphors, so probably this is a typo.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

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May 05, 2015 at 11:47 AM Author: James
I don't think even any Chinese make CFL with halophoshor, it simply doesn't work. Philips was simply relatively late to adjust the numbering system of its fluorescent colours to follow the now standardised 3-digit colour codes that were first introduced by Thorn in 1990. Their lamps were offered in colours 82 (now 827), 83 (now 830) and 84 (now 840). The 3500K version, now known as colour 835 didn't fit their system - it would have had to have been called something like 83.5! Since that looked silly, they instead kept the 2-digit code but called it a simple 35. Since that led to confusion with the Halophosphor colour 35, Philips eventually came in line with the other manufacturers and adopted the same 3-digit colour codes.
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Adam


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May 05, 2015 at 12:00 PM Author: merc
That's a logical explanation.

I don't know if there are cheap halophosphate CFL lamps manufactured today but I believe they were in the past.
I once read about that on the Internet and I believe I had some (cheapo lamps purchased in a supermarket in early 2000's). Their colour was just awful. I didn't check their spectra but I don't think such greenish/yellowish light was triphosphors.

Not a misoLEDist...

dor123
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May 05, 2015 at 12:32 PM Author: dor123
@James: I don't know what do you speak, but I have an AQ Light 15W CFL, that my mother bought me, at a flea market in Georgia, in my room at my father home and it have daylight halophosphors .

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

James
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May 05, 2015 at 03:39 PM Author: James
Of course it's quite possible that some manufacturers have tried ordinary halophosphates in a CFL, but certainly for the loading at which modern CFLs are operated, the lifetime performance is so poor as to make them quite useless. Because of this I do not believe that anyone is still producing these - but I could be wrong!
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Verd a ray classic.


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May 05, 2015 at 03:53 PM Author: Silverliner
There are some off brand CFLs sold in the dollar stores that are really dim. A quick check with my spectroscope reveals a broad spectrum, suggesting they are halophosphor. They come in warm white and daylight.

May all the great lighting technologies have their place in history.

Administrator of Lighting-Gallery.net. Need help? PM me.

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May 05, 2015 at 04:59 PM Author: Ash
Confirming it, i had a cheapo halophosphor CFL purchased in Israel as late as 2006. It was way larger than other CFLs of the same wattage and quite dim
dor123
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May 05, 2015 at 09:49 PM Author: dor123
I forgot to mention that it still going strong despite 4 years old, and is as glaring as a triphosphors one.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

James
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May 05, 2015 at 11:55 PM Author: James
In this case it is certainly not halophosphate, that can onlt survive a few low hundreds of hours in a lamp having such loading.

Note that there are several broadband and non-halophosphor materials in use, especially for daylight colour CFLs. One likely candidate for your lamp is BaMg2Al11O27:Eu2+Mn2+. This has a very broad dual-peak emission from about 380-600nm, with the Eu2+ giving a peak at 450nm blue and the Mn2+ giving a second peak at about 510nm green.

Often a red phosphor is also added. This may be either narrowband, or one of the older broad red/orange non-halophosphor materials may be used.

If you are interested in such things I can highly reccommend the book "The Chemistry of Artificial Lighting Devices" by R.C.Ropp of 1993. Over 600 pages of fascinating lamp science details, of which more than half is dedicated to his specialism in lamp phosphors.
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May 06, 2015 at 01:51 AM Author: dor123
Found the picture of the spectrum of the said lamp: http://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-58755
In the next time I will go to my father home, I will try to capture a better image with my DVD-RW.
This lamp is on once every 4 weeks, when I go to my father for the weekend (Thursday, friday and saturday).

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

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May 06, 2015 at 04:21 AM Author: monkeyface
@James: do have a ISBN code for this book you mentioned?
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