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Spectrum of 60W 6500K Induction Lamp

Spectrum of 60W 6500K Induction Lamp

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Typical cool tri-phorphors like many bluer CFL lamps. While testing this 60Watt lamp for the first time, I noticed that the 405nm violet line was almost missing visually, even with such a high CCT (6500°K). Spectrograph shows the 365nm UV line is blocked-out, probably by the choice of glass or coating or both. The lamp eventually gets hot but cools rapidly when the power is turned off (but the ferrite cores reamain hot, which is so odd to experience). The ballast draws 65w of power.

IMG_2324 Sunmaster400wConversion.jpg IMG_2311_Philips-CDM205_U_O.jpg IMG_2445_InductionLampSpectrum.jpg Globe-60wBlackLight.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:ARK Lighting
Model Reference:AIN-TP-60W-6K
Lamp
Lamp Type:Inductiom
Fixture
Ballast Type:Electronic For Induction Lamp
Electrical
Wattage:60W
Voltage:120-227 volts
Optical
Color Temperature:6500K
Color Rendering Index:80
Physical/Production
Dimensions:Approx 7" x 4"

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Album name:lights*plus / Lamp Spectra
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:1084 KB
Date added:Feb 13, 2016
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dor123
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Feb 13, 2016 at 02:28 AM Author: dor123
This is the typical spectrum of daylight triphosphors fluorescent lamps and CFL. My Philips Tornado 23W 865 CFL, have the same spectrum.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

lights*plus
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Feb 13, 2016 at 02:54 AM Author: lights*plus
Yes, 865 is the same number for this lamp, but I was surprised at the missing UV! Tri-phosphors normally allow some of the 365nm line to pass, but not in this lamp.
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Feb 13, 2016 at 01:38 PM Author: merc
Thanks for sharing! It shouldn't attract insects so. (Recently, I read a marketing leaflet promoting LEDs - there was a statement they /in contrary to fluorescent lamps/ don't attract insects because of the UV part of the light missing. Believe or not. I don't know, never tested this.)
dor123
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Feb 13, 2016 at 09:17 PM Author: dor123
Blue light also attracts insects, so white and blue LEDs can attract insects as well.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

Globe Collector
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Mar 23, 2016 at 11:37 PM Author: Globe Collector
Those things you have marked as "magnets" are not actually magnets...these are the ferrite coupling transformer cores (made from Sr(FeO2)2:Ba(feO2)2 or something similar). They operate at about 250-350KHz and the lamp acts as a "lossy shorted turn". Put the end of a steel screwdriver to the ferrite cores when it is off, it should not stick and there should be no residual magnetism. When it is on, there should be some weak attraction and the end of the screwdriver may get warm from eddy currents induced in it.

What you have marked as "Hg Drop" is probably not that either, is it a solid? Mercury melts at about -38.8*C so it would be well and truly liquid at the operating temperature of this lamp. In reality this in an amalgam, an alloy of which one constituent is mercury....usually the other metals in it are bismuth, indium and sometimes zinc. The mercury only constitutes less than 5% of its mass.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

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Mar 24, 2016 at 12:20 AM Author: lights*plus
Ok but I shouldn't delete the pic as everything will be deleted. Should've wrote Ferrite Magnets or better yet, Ferrite Cores. Wasn't thinking critically when I created the image.

I think the drop was soft, even before powering up. After working for a few hours, I think the drop had shrunk (but will try to notice next time I power it up again as my concern was to test the ballast/lamp & record the spectrum). So do the bismuth and indium ever get excited enough to radiate their own light?
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Mar 24, 2016 at 01:44 AM Author: Globe Collector
Do you know the "Clausius Capayron Relation/Equation" from thermodynamics? This is the relationship between temperature and pressure for any PURE substance in a closed system containing the vapor and liquid of that substance. A refigerator is a good practical example of such a system...a really good fridge technician actually has the CC relation in his head even though he probably is not aware of it by name, he can hold the outlet "High Side" tube from a compressor in a fridge with (say R22) in it, and know the pressure in there. A pressure cooker works in the same way. Consider this definition of boiling point, "A liquid will boil when its vapor pressure is equal to the atmospheric pressure", did you ever hear a science teacher say that...if so that would be a REAL teacher, not one of these "modern" things that are "taught to teach" and their heads a filled with this rubbish and they then think they can teach anything from Organic Chemistry to Piloting Ships up an Estuary. In reality, to teach you must understand at least ten times more than what you expect your students to learn...but I digress...

In a normal linear TL fluorescent lamp where pure mercury is used, the T-P relationship is about 40*C (c110*F) to give the 10 odd millitorr of pressure to get that maximal 257nm flux and minimal resonance imprisonment, the DEFINITION of a "Compact" fluorescent lamp is that this same pressure is to be obtained at the higher temperature of about 65*C...I assume this lamp gets pretty warm after running a while....this retardation of vapor pressure is caused by the other elements, particularly the bismuth in the alloy.

Think of Ceasium Fluoride, an Alkali Halide made from a low melting or liquid metal and volatile gas which react to give white crystals melting at about 600*C.
Now, "move in" and think of a Alkail Earth Chalcide, like Strontium Oxide, a very refactory white powder from a volatile gas and hard, but reactive metal, keep moving in, consider a Triel Phnictide, like Aluminium Nitride, still white, hard and high melting point, but now move up the Periodic Table...up to where adding another proton does not make much of a change...(if you are 15 and your sister, 18, she seems quite a bit older than you, but what about when you are 115 and she is 118, you are now nearly the same age) so now consider Indium Antimonide, it is shiny and metallic looking, but still somewhat brittle...is it a true compound, like CsI, SrO or AlN, if is it now some sort of mixture? Being stoiciomrtric, it is actually a compound, but if you mix one mole of indium with 1.2 moles of antimony, what then? A mixture of InSb and free Sb or something more complex and non stoiciometric...maybe crystals of pure InSb in some less well defined matrix of a substance consisting of both elements but non stoiciometric...what about lower valinces of each element giving rise to many compounds and phases....this is where hard chemistry and metallurgy merge and real useful knowledge is to be had....

In this alloy, "mercurous bismuthide", (Hg2)3Bi, probably exists as a distinct phase and it is the "bonding" of the metallic mercury (playing the role of a "cation") and the semi non metallic Bismuth (which is shiny and metallic, but mot very malleable and somewhat crystalline and brittle) as a Phnictigen, playing the role of an "Anion" in this "salt" which reduces the vapor pressure at a given temperature.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

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