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Soviet made 36 volt 40 watt garage lamp

Soviet made 36 volt 40 watt garage lamp

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This is a special lamp. It has e27 base and normal envelope, but there's a catch. It is 36 volt 40 watt lamp. These lamps were created for a special purpose. In USSR it was a code for every city to have a garage site near the city, so people can have their own individual garages. They were small buildings, that had space inside for a car and a bit of space for other uses, like a worktable, etc. They were built back to back in rows of 50 and each had 220 volt inrush meter. Since these garageswere back to back and were made from wood, to minimize the rish of a fire, it was a code to have a meter and immediately after it a step down transformer that transforms 220 volt to 36 volts, and that went in the garage for applications, like drills, lights, soldering irons, heaters, lathes, compressors, etc. Of course many obeyed that, and used straight 220 volt inside the garages. This lamp is a nice artifact from those times. They are quiet rare these days. And to top that - this lamp is NOS!

IMG_20181011_183716.jpg IMG_20181011_183215.jpg IMG_20181011_183320.jpg IMG_20181011_183104.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:M (I don't know what that stands for)
Lamp
Lamp Type:Incandescent
Filament/Radiator Type:double coil
Base:e27
Shape/Finish:round ball
Service Life:approx 10k hours
Electrical
Wattage:40w
Voltage:36v
Optical
Color Temperature:2700k
Physical/Production
Factory Location:Russia, probably Smolensk
Application/Use:For communal garage lighting

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sox35
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Mainly the electrical side of things


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Oct 11, 2018 at 12:53 PM Author: sox35
36V is an unusual voltage, here we have 12V, 25V and 50V for some applications, I remember when I had just left school I worked in a place where they had lathes and milling machines etc., the individual lamps over the machines were 25V, I was told the reason was that the filaments were more robust and could withstand the vibration from the machines better than mains voltage lamps.

110V is used on construction sites here in the UK for safety reasons. All lighting and power tools are fed from step-down transformers with a centre tap to earth on the secondary winding, so that the maximum voltage to earth is 55V. Not seen 36V before, though.

Ria in Aberdeen
It'll be all right in the end, and if it isn't all right, it isn't the end Smiley

Roi_hartmann
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Oct 11, 2018 at 07:53 PM Author: Roi_hartmann
I think 36v was also commonly used in military communication applications at least in Finland long ago. I've seen some old generators from 60's that only had 36v dc output and those were made for the Finnish Defence Forces.

Aamulla aurinko, illalla AIRAM





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Oct 19, 2018 at 01:39 AM Author:
vytautas_lamps

Where do you get such ridiculous information about lamps? )
These lamps are made in Russia even today. And they not rare. They are intended for all places where there is a danger of electric shock. In accordance with accepted standards for electrical safety.
Factory machines, lighting of underground mines, construction sites, etc.
This voltage standard is dictated only by electrical safety.
Also are lamps on 12V.
https://street-lighting.webnode.ru/lampy-bytovogo-naznacheniya/resr-relz/mo36-50/
migette1
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Peter


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Oct 19, 2018 at 02:10 AM Author: migette1
Hi that last comment was a bit strong we don't want to turn people away from posting info even if it could be inaccurate, my posts could be a bit suspicius certainly my spelling does not help!!!! That M on the lamp means it was made by the Moscow Lamp Works and appears on many lamps including neon glow lamps......peter

Interested in the history of electric lighting and incandescent in particular and neon glow lamps.





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Oct 19, 2018 at 04:58 AM Author:
Yes, the letter "M" with rounded side faces is a Moscow electric lamp factory.
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSoFJrSkxT2jw3GEsG3oLPM_aSDc09Pq3_NeTFeqAupLTmbo-wN
But in this case it’s not about labeling. In this case, I do not see her mark.
Lamps with such voltage made many factories including MELZ.
But in this case, i can say for sure that this lamp is not like a lamp produced by a Moscow factory.
migette1
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Peter


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Oct 19, 2018 at 06:41 AM Author: migette1
That M with rounded side faces is exactly how it appears on my neons by MELZ thanks again

Interested in the history of electric lighting and incandescent in particular and neon glow lamps.

vytautas_lamps
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My idol is Mylene Farmer, deal with it.


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Oct 19, 2018 at 07:19 AM Author: vytautas_lamps
I live in Lithuania and my grandpa was an electrical engineer and he had two garages of whom I was talking about. Inside of both there was a meter and then a step-down transformer and every appliance inside used the 36 volts. It is not false information. I know for a fact that at least in Lithuania it was code to have a step-down transformer and these lamps were indeed to be used for that purpose. I seen it with my eyes being used in many garages for lighting. I appreciate your information And I said they are rare, because the original ones from that ear ARE rare. I know that they are made to this day, I have few new ones.

New lighting technologies is a pity fest everywhere you look. From LEDs that last only for two months, to a never-ending global starvation of t8 fluorescent tubes.
We shall reinforce ourselves with good old full mercury t12s and HIDs made to surpass one's life, and give them all the middle finger ;





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Oct 19, 2018 at 09:11 AM Author:
Oh, now i all understand. )
Yes, it could be so, too. In auto workshops are also required or at least desirable voltage 36, 24 or 12 volt. In garages this was often not respected, since it was property and inspections there were exceptions to the rules.
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