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Microsoft Lumia 650 PenTile OLED display

Microsoft Lumia 650 PenTile OLED display


I recently bought a Microsoft Lumia 650, a Windows Phone, off my friend. I noticed when you look close enough at the OLED display, you can notice a sort of fine checkerboard pattern. I decided to take a macro photo of the display to get a better look at it, and it turns out the display is what I would later learn is a PenTile display.

PenTile OLED displays are common on smartphones. Basically any phone with an OLED display that's not a top-of-the-line phone is going to have a PenTile display. While an ordinary color matrix display has subpixels arranged as Red-Green-Blue-Red-Green-Blue, a PenTile Display is Red-Green-Blue-Green-Red-Green-Blue-Green. While the number of green subpixels matches the resolution of the display, there are actually a reduced number of red and blue subpixels. This means that the red and blue subpixels are actually shared between full pixels. One red subpixel might be shared between two pixels.

The reason this is done is because it's well known that blue OLED elements have a shorter lifespan than other colors of OLED elements - they get dimmer quicker, giving the display a yellow tint. By reducing the number of blue subpixels, their wear has less of an effect on the overall display quality. And the reason it's possible at all is because humans are most sensitive to green light, so it turns out you can slightly reduce the red and blue components of an image without noticeable effect. And because of the custom algorithm used to drive the display, the reduced number of subpixels doesn't adversely effect the image quality. On a 720p display like this phone, you just get the fine checkerboard pattern when you look close enough. You apparently don't notice any difference on a 1080p display. However, on early PenTile WVGA and smaller displays on early smartphones, the reduced subpixel count could have an adverse effect, making certain text hard to read.

So overall I've been very interested to learn how all this works. It's worth noting that this is the only PenTile display I've seen so far that has circular green subpixels. All other pictures of them I've seen have all rectangular subpixels.

This phone is a year old, and the display is starting to turn slightly yellow.

DSC01121_2.jpg WP_20171127_14_19_49_Pro.jpg IMG_20170415_170517_359.jpg IMG_5976.JPG

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Album name:themaritimegirl / Miscellaneous
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Date added:May 02, 2017
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dor123
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May 02, 2017 at 10:07 PM Author: dor123
I think that TFT LCD displays, have similar pixel design, except that the pixel aren't lighting by themselves and need a backlighting.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

ace100w120v
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May 02, 2017 at 10:45 PM Author: ace100w120v
Curious, on my iPhone 5S, sometimes the display goes "faint"; not dim but colors aren't terribly vivid. It does seem to be exacerbated by cold, even on 40 degree evening walks this will sometimes happen. Any ideas?
rjluna2
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May 03, 2017 at 05:13 AM Author: rjluna2
That is an interesting theory

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

dor123
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May 03, 2017 at 05:57 AM Author: dor123
Even me can't photograph the pixel of my CCFL backlit Samsung T220P LCD display with my Canon SX150IS camera, even with manual focus.
This is the maximum I could:

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

themaritimegirl
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May 03, 2017 at 11:11 AM Author: themaritimegirl
dor123 - I've never heard of an RGBG LCD display. There's no reason to make one that way.

ace - All iPhones have LCD displays, so I'm not sure what's happening there. I know early displays would switch slower in the cold, but I'm not sure why it would affect the color.

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