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240 volt outlet to plug it in

240 volt outlet to plug it in

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240 volt outlet I installed to plug it in.

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Filename:IMG_8215.JPG
Album name:mdcastle / Old GE Cobrahead
Keywords:Lanterns
File Size:476 KB
Date added:Oct 08, 2015
Dimensions:2465 x 1848 pixels
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URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-112450
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sol
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Oct 08, 2015 at 01:20 PM Author: sol
If you use this to power the simple 2 wire choke ballast you have, be careful if you remove the lamp with power on. The shell of the lamp holder will have a potential of 120V to ground. I believe the code here in Canada only allow CWI ballasts to be used on 240V (or any system phase-to-phase). Not sure about the USA, though. In Europe, they have 230V phase-to-neutral, so if wired properly the shell of the lamp holder is on the neutral side.
streetlight98
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Oct 08, 2015 at 02:48 PM Author: streetlight98
The USA has no such code like Canada, otherwise this ballast couldn't be used. You should never remove the lamp with the power on anyway.

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

Ash
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Oct 08, 2015 at 02:58 PM Author: Ash
Allways treat the shell as live anyway, even on 120V... The shell will get live if Neutral got disconnected upstream (plug pulled halfway out, upstream wire broken, power company failure, ...) or if you plug into a socket where Phase and Neutral are reversed
sol
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Oct 08, 2015 at 07:52 PM Author: sol
I am not encouraging anyone to do so, but I know of some people who do change lamps and what not with the power on. The electricians at work used to do it with 400W MH. Those fixtures were replaced with fluorescent and the electrician was let go.
mdcastle
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mdcastle 26956281@N02
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Oct 09, 2015 at 06:33 AM Author: mdcastle
At my work I witnessed them change 277 volt ballasts with the electricity on. These things were built during the capacitor plague and constantly going bad (I rescued one from the trash and it had the obviously defective capacitors; can't shut off the lights to the entire floor to fix a fixture.
Ash
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Oct 09, 2015 at 01:13 PM Author: Ash
What about splitting it to few circuits at construction time ?

At the very least, undo the wirenuts in the beginning of a row and then do all the row without power ?

Sure would be a fair bang if one of the new ballasts came defective and shorted out..... And it would trip the circuit anyway
arcblue
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Oct 09, 2015 at 01:53 PM Author: arcblue
Funny you should mention that, Ash. At a former office I worked at, some fool thought that changing the lamps from 4100K to 3500K would reduce "glare." While in the process of relamping a fixture, he had a lamp inserted at one end and it touched the reflector with the pins at the other end. Shorted out the electronic ballast. The office lights were in fact switched on several circuits but he couldn't be bothered to walk over to switch them off.

I was changing a lamp in my OV-20 that had an open-shell socket - power was off but the fixture was plugged in and I got a nasty shock. Turns out the outlet strip it was plugged into was wired backwards. Took me a while to figure that out! Normally I change lamps with the power off but sometimes I am in a hurry too...probably not wise, I've also had sockets come apart or lamps separate at their bases.

I'm lampin...

streetlight98
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Oct 12, 2015 at 03:52 PM Author: streetlight98
Yeah in my school there are multiple circuits for lights in the hallways and classrooms but the new wing has one switch for all the light in the hallway and each classroom has just one switch. Stupid in my opinion, but that's how they did it. I relamped the hallway troffers in the votech building at my school with the power on. Only because I have no idea where the switches for them are and they had those rotary-lock sockets so there was no risk of shorting the pins to the fixture as long as I was somewhat paying attention (still possible I suppose). I'll shut off fluorescents when relamping if convenience/practical but will relamp with power on if I have to or if it's just easier. Will not change a ballast with the power on. Too risky for my taste. I'd never relamp an HID with the power on though. For street lights I'd typically just take the photocell out, which deenergizes the lamp on 120V but still leaves a live hot leg with a 240V set-up like above.

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

Ash
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Oct 12, 2015 at 04:05 PM Author: Ash
Most schools here have the same setup of 14 4ft 36W or 40W lamps :

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The 2 single lanterns are wall floodlights lighting the blackboard/whiteboard on that wall

The 6 doubles are plain ordinary strips

3 switches per class - 1 for the wall floods, 2 for the other lanterns split into 3 3 or 2 4. Sometimes 4 switches, with either the wall floods being each switcheble by itself, or the others being split into 2 2 2
streetlight98
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Oct 12, 2015 at 05:13 PM Author: streetlight98
It's all different at my schools depending on the school itself and the class rooms. We don't have dedicated chalkboard/dry-erase board lights. In my elementary school, they had 4ft three lamp wrap lights that were spaced 4ft apart end-to-end and either 4 or 6ft side-to-side (been a long time since I've been there lol). My middle school originally had 2X F40T12/RS wraps in continuous rows in the classrooms but they were replaced by three lamp 2X4 lensed troffers. It still ended up being the same number of lamps, just fewer fixture (and less even lighting). My high school has all new T8 wraps, installed in 2011, but they kept the original configurations. Depending on the age of the wing (the school was added onto several times) some rooms have three continuous rows with the row by the windows on a switch and the other two rows on a second switch, while others have two rows of two 8ft tandem F32T8 wraps (not joined end-to end, just four 8ft tandem wraps separated; the two 8ft lights by the windows on one switch and the other two on a second). Some rooms have unique configurations such as non-tandem 4ft wraps spaced apart on a drop ceiling or what not. All the classroom wrap lights have two lamps per 4ft section as do the hallway lights. the bathrooms have one or two lamps. The newest wing has three lamp 2X4 lensed troffers in the class rooms, with one switch controlling the whole room and the hallway also has the same three lamp troffers, with one switch controlling the entire hallway.

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

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