Return to the thumbnail page Display/hide file information See previous file See next file

Vintage Osram MV lamp

Vintage Osram MV lamp

Click to view full size image

According to Facebook this is an incredibly rare lamp. I managed to get for a steal on eBay for only $40

ED35C3E7-6181-45A3-8C64-21D8F3520A0B.jpeg AE2D8DE9-7B27-4266-ABF7-F535DE6B9355.jpeg MV100 Clear.JPG ACDB82C3-C559-4211-B0A3-AC90BE583E0F.jpeg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Osram
Lamp
Lamp Type:MV
Base:E40
Electrical
Wattage:125W
Voltage:125V
Current:1.15A
Optical
Lumen Output:4600
Lumen Efficacy:57
Color Temperature:4700
Color Rendering Index:40
Physical/Production
Factory Location:England
Fabrication Date:SEP/1961

File information

File information

Download: Download this File
Filename:AE2D8DE9-7B27-4266-ABF7-F535DE6B9355.jpeg
Album name:HID Man_250w / MV Lamps
Rating (1 votes):
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:414 KB
Date added:Jun 05, 2019
Dimensions:1848 x 2464 pixels
Displayed:171 times
URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-160352
Favorites:Add to Favorites
Comments
Bulb Freak
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 41
View Gallery


View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 05, 2019 at 07:36 AM Author: Bulb Freak
as I mentioned on Facebook I believe this to be the E40 base version of this lamp in James collection http://www.lamptech.co.uk/Spec%20Sheets/D%20MB%20GEC%20MBF125.htm

I dont I have ever seen another one before let alone one with the E40 base

so thats a very nice and rare find, please take good care of it

My other hobby is buses, especially the Routemaster

vintagefluorescent
Full Member
***
Offline

Posts: 134
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 05, 2019 at 08:21 AM Author: vintagefluorescent
Beautiful- And it’s a mercury vapor light bulb ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
fluorescent lover 40
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 188
View Gallery

Lights are awesome! :)


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 05, 2019 at 12:59 PM Author: fluorescent lover 40
Very nice, rare lamp!

Power provider: Southern California Edison (SCE)

-Date decoder of some US lamps 1960-present.
-Switch and receptacle collector.
-I'll save any vintage lamp! Smiley

Jovan
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 36
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 05, 2019 at 01:40 PM Author: Jovan
Would you save this lamp ?
Choukai Kai
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 0
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 07, 2019 at 12:17 PM Author: Choukai Kai
This rarity does not exist here in Brazil nor dreaming.
James
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 140
View Gallery


View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 07, 2019 at 04:31 PM Author: James
Really stunning, and so nice to find it new in the original wrapper!

The E40 capped version is indeed the original style. Its predecessor of 1937 used to have a very temperature-sensitive silicate phosphor which required a large 130mm diameter glass bulb, like 1000W incandescent, and such a big bulb necessitated a similarly large cap. Then in 1950 the more thermally stable magnesium fluorogermanate /C phosphor was developed by Westinghouse, which allowed the bulb diameter to reduce to the more standard 90mm of this lamp. But for a few years the E40 caps remained popular in Europe, to re-lamp earlier fixtures.
Choukai Kai
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 0
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 07, 2019 at 10:17 PM Author: Choukai Kai
In the case the phosphorescent coating of yesteryear was more satisfactory than current modern Yttrium. Magnesium apparently left the hue in a pink color, unlike the greenish color of today. Brazil follows a pattern somewhat similar to European, ballasts of only 220 to 380v, with lamps in socket E40. In the 60's here in the south of Brazil there were some MV lamps imported from Europe.

I've once seen a Polamp 250w with almost its 30 years old, probably running from the 80s until 2010. I tried to save and preserve but the staff had already taken out and placed HPS 150w.
James
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 140
View Gallery


View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 08, 2019 at 01:32 AM Author: James
Magnesium fluorogermanate in fact has a deeper red colour than the present yttrium vanadate, however the total visible quantity of red is less. Additionally it has a slightly yellowish body colour, which leads to some absorption of the mercury blue and violet lines, which reduces lamp efficacy. Due to the filtered blue and weak red, the net result is that magnesium fluorogermanate lamps have a slightly greenish colour. The modern yttrium vanadate have a more pinkish light.

Interesting that Brazil should import European mercury lamps in the 1960s, they must have been really expensive with the high import taxes. In Brazil there were also at least three Factories making mercury lamps according to EU style, from the 1970s - Osram at Osasco, Philips at Capuava and Recife, and Sylvania at São Paulo and Vinhedo.
Andy
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 17
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 08, 2019 at 10:20 AM Author: Andy
What a superb and amazing find! Well done.

My main area of interest is vintage fluorescent and mercury lamps. Always interested in doing lamp trades - just let me know! Smiley

Choukai Kai
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 0
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 08, 2019 at 10:44 AM Author: Choukai Kai

Magnesium fluorogermanate in fact has a deeper red colour than the present yttrium vanadate, however the total visible quantity of red is less. Additionally it has a slightly yellowish body colour, which leads to some absorption of the mercury blue and violet lines, which reduces lamp efficacy. Due to the filtered blue and weak red, the net result is that magnesium fluorogermanate lamps have a slightly greenish colour. The modern yttrium vanadate have a more pinkish light.

Interesting that Brazil should import European mercury lamps in the 1960s, they must have been really expensive with the high import taxes. In Brazil there were also at least three Factories making mercury lamps according to EU style, from the 1970s - Osram at Osasco, Philips at Capuava and Recife, and Sylvania at São Paulo and Vinhedo.


Probably the Yttrium of yesteryear was more pink than today. I think that by the 2000s Brazil started to build MV lamps more frequently inside the country.

Maybe the coloring I got confused with the quality of the ballast that changes the color of the lamp because it is not delivering all the efficiency. Or using lower quality capacitors, it makes the light go green weak.
dor123
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2538
View Gallery
Other loves are computers, office equipment, A/Cs


View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 08, 2019 at 11:55 PM Author: dor123
The capacitor don't affect lamp performance on series choke.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

Choukai Kai
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 0
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 09, 2019 at 12:39 AM Author: Choukai Kai
So what really affects? The power factor? To this day I do not understand for sure what this is either.

Of course my example will be useless, because MV lamps uses magnetic ballast. But an HID automotive lamp, in a superb ballast (OEM ballast) a Philips +85122 bulb for example, will give its brightness of 3200lm with clarity, with its true color of 4300k, a yellowish white drawn to a rose. If you install in a poor Chinese ballast (Typical aftermarket), it will not have your total income and even worse for a color of 6000k. '-'
James
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 140
View Gallery


View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 09, 2019 at 04:03 AM Author: James
For a mercury lamp its colour is quite independent of power - it is determined mainly by the phosphor type, and the age of the lamp. During life the arc tube blackens and this reduces first the UV and blue output, which reduces the phosphor output and makes the light more yellowish. Also the phosphor gradually degrades and this tends to make the light more greenish.

For metal halide lamps, you are absolutely right that their colour is very sensitive to lamp power (and hence the ballast, capacitor and mains voltage stability). This is because MH arc tubes do not contain only mercury, but are filled with a mixture of different elements. Each element has a different vapour pressure at different temperatures - so tiny changes in arc tube temperature (eg from the ballast / power) can cause more or less of different halides to be vaporised into the arc, and since each salt has its own characteristic colour, this can cause big variations in the colour of the lamp.
Max.
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 49
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 09, 2019 at 10:41 AM Author: Max.
What an incredible find, and for just US$ 40... Nice catch!
AngryHorse
Sr. Member
****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 366
View Gallery

Rich


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 09, 2019 at 10:45 AM Author: AngryHorse
Yeah the E40 125s are rare in newer mercs, but to find a vintage one the same is quite special!

Current: UK 230V, 50Hz
Power provider: e.on energy
Street lighting in our town: Philips UniStreet LED

"Beauty fades, dumb is forever".......Judge Judy Cheesy

Choukai Kai
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 0
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 09, 2019 at 05:46 PM Author: Choukai Kai

For a mercury lamp its colour is quite independent of power - it is determined mainly by the phosphor type, and the age of the lamp. During life the arc tube blackens and this reduces first the UV and blue output, which reduces the phosphor output and makes the light more yellowish. Also the phosphor gradually degrades and this tends to make the light more greenish.

For metal halide lamps, you are absolutely right that their colour is very sensitive to lamp power (and hence the ballast, capacitor and mains voltage stability). This is because MH arc tubes do not contain only mercury, but are filled with a mixture of different elements. Each element has a different vapour pressure at different temperatures - so tiny changes in arc tube temperature (eg from the ballast / power) can cause more or less of different halides to be vaporised into the arc, and since each salt has its own characteristic colour, this can cause big variations in the colour of the lamp.



I understand and it makes perfect sense! However an MH lamp as we know it corrects the coloration in the arc tube itself. Does it mean that phosphorescent coating is only useful for reducing excessive brightness and converting into softer lighting to the eyes in low bay luminaires? Unlike MH clear that the lighting in small places is pure impiety, the clarity is very high. Lol
© 2005-2019 Lighting-Gallery.net | Powered by: Coppermine Photo Gallery