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GE 1000 watt lamp

GE 1000 watt lamp

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Don't really know what we used these lamps for. But this one was about to be thrown out during a shop clean-up, so being NOS I saved it.

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Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:GE
Electrical
Wattage:1000

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Filename:1000w_GE_Mogul.jpg
Album name:takemorepills / Various Stuff
Keywords:Miscellaneous
File Size:304 KB
Date added:Sep 01, 2016
Dimensions:2465 x 1848 pixels
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URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-125098
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Globe Collector
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Sep 01, 2016 at 05:39 PM Author: Globe Collector
In this day and age of the "Semiconductor Tide" you can't afford to destroy ANY lamps....they are just too rare now.

I have one of these and got it by a very "rigimerolious" process. In 1993 I went to Viet Nam. In Saigon I saw the busted remains of one of these on a street stall...I clearly remember the axial filament which is non-existant in Australia, but I never managed to find a complete lamp.

Years later, my Landlord, a Vietnamese person, was going back to Saigon so I cobbled up a composite "photograph" of this lamp by colaging together bits of the filament of an airfield approach lamp I have on top of an Australian 1000 watter which has a similar bulb size and shape, but has a totally different wave wreath filament. I loaded the image onto his mobile/cell 'phone and asked him to show it to stall holders in Yersin market in Saigon....this is the place where all the interesting lamps in Viet Nam end up...

After a few attempts and many stall holders telling him that such a chimera of a lamp did not exist and that the photograph was obviously a fake, one stall holder recognized it for what it was, an attempt to depict a North American axial filament lamp AND knew where to find one.....so I got my 1Kw North American Axial Filament in the end...by a very long and involved process!

In hindsight, I wish I could have found it as easily as you did!

I don't have the packet though, and it is interesting to see what it looks like. Maybe you could scan it and send me the image so I can make a "fake" packet for my lamp.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

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Sep 01, 2016 at 08:08 PM Author: takemorepills
Wow GC, is the lamp you acquired a real US made GE? If so, was it left over from the war, or do you think it was brought in later?
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Down with lamp bans!


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Sep 01, 2016 at 10:25 PM Author: nicksfans
Glad you saved it. I have a lamp just like this, albeit a somewhat newer one with more modern packaging.

I like my lamps thick, my ballasts heavy, and my fixtures tough.

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Sep 02, 2016 at 05:33 AM Author: rjluna2
Oh, wow with the package with the bulb worth thousand words here

With the bulb and the package can tell you the whole story of the specimen.

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

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Sep 02, 2016 at 07:00 AM Author: Globe Collector
T.M.P , I collected over 1500 lamps in Viet Nam in 1993. When I came back through Changi Airport in Singapore my boxes of lamps were separated from all the other passengers' luggage and on a separate luggage carousel. Two customs officials asked me what was inside, I told them, "Electric Incandescent and Discharge Lamps, or more coloquially, Light Bulbs". One replied, "You expect us to believe that?" I replied, "You are the ones with the X-Ray machine, lamps have filaments of tungsten, a metal with K-Absorbtion edges aligned with the radiation from a tungsten anode x-ray tube, so they [the filaments, not the lamps] should be quite opaque and clearly visible...AND, I suspect you have looked inside with this method already." They replied in a cat and mouse sort of way, "Why so many...are you a dealer or an importer?" I could see their angle now, they just wanted to hit me with import tax, despite the fact I was only passing through Singapore. I replied, "If I were a dealer or importer there would be large numbers of just a few types, did you see that on the screen of your machine?" Now I know they had seen many, many different types in there, there were two or three of some types, but largely they were all different. "Why so many different types?" they inquired, I replied, "I'm a collector of lamps and my goal is to try to get one example of every single type that ever existed!", at this that simply said, "Thank You" and walked away!

All those lamps in those boxes were a historico-cultural-political snapshot of all that had gone on in Viet Nam in the previous 50 years, WW-II, the Viet Minh, the French Occupation, the esculating tensions, the increasing American and Soviet involvement, the guts of the VN war, the embargo and aftermath of the 1975 victory of the North...every lamp had a story to tell, a story literally written all over it...

There were two Lumen-Coteco 300 watters from the pre Dien-Bien-Phu French Indochina era, an Anh Sang branded A-60 GLS from Thu-Duc just proir to 1975, southern Vietnamese Dien-Quang lamps and Northern Rang Dong Lamps to mention just the main Vietnamese ones.

Then there were all the lamps form those other powers that "poked their bibs" into Viet Nam's affairs...


Soviet ones from many different plants, like those in Seransk and Riga in the former Latvian S.S.R., now Latvia.

Some came from the most remote places you would never in your wildest dreams EVER imaging they could make lamps, like a far flung plant in Myluu-Suu in Kyrgyzstan!

There were photographic lamps, darkroom lamps, engarger lamps, strdio lamps and searchlight lamps from Japan, U.S., China, Thailand, Soviet Union and Korea.

There were night clubs, press offices, barracks and all sorts of things just simply left behind after the war ended by whatever power was last using them....all with lamps inside...I remember one night club, now a hairdresser, but still frozen in time with all the 70's North American decor, it was as if the G.I.'s had just dropped their stuff and left....shops in Sai Gon sold all sorts of old stuff left behind, one shop was CRAMMED with cameras, another had soldier's helmets, some even had radioactive isotopes like Radium 226 and tritium!

But it is ALL GONE now, Sai Gon is just another "Glass and Aluminium" metropolis like Singapore of Jakarta these days, most of the lighting is semiconductor and all the old interesting stuff has long gone. I still regret not buying MORE lamps in Yersin Market and Nguyen Thai Binh Street...the Narva Woods Glass UV 125 merc, the 10 Chinese Cultural Revolution "A-H1 Clones" I only got one of, the MHN-T, the Ya-Ming Pink Metal Halide....and on they go...

If you EVER find yourself in another country, you hsve to switch your lamp preserving awareness to "150%", and still it ain't enough....I feel you are up in Washington State....pity it ain't Florida, because I'd be jumppn' in to swim to Cuba quick smart before all that fascinating stuff....and lamps evaporate like they did in Sai Gon!

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

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Sep 02, 2016 at 07:07 AM Author: takemorepills
GC, I find your story very interesting, and I can relate to it also. I used to live and work in China, and the city I stayed in the most, Wuxi, went from being a typical 3rd world city to a bustling metropolitan high end city in just under 10 years. The development was crazy!

On these forums, I see lots of foreign (to me) lights that were used in China at that time. Aside from SBMV, I never saw anything lighting wise in China that was too interesting. Everything was CFL, only interesting aspect was they had lots of colored CFL there long before you could find them easily in the US.
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Sep 02, 2016 at 07:51 AM Author: Globe Collector
You either didn't go far enough out into "the bondocks"....a trip up to Lahasa would be an eye-opener for anybody...and "smoke out" lots of interesting lamps I'm sure....or all the old stuff has just been obliterated like in Viet Nam. Some Chinese are waking up to historical presevation....some are starting to kick up a bit of a stink at the rate Hutongs are being flattened in Beijing.....and don't start me on Vancouver......now that IS lighting the blue touch paper and standing well back!

I was poking around WuXi on Google Maps just a while back, looking for lamp plants...but inaccurate PinYin translation still hampers this process and I'm too old to learn characters, even the simplified ones! I think WuXi is where NeonLit is...the crowd who supply Megaman.

Out in the suburbs of Sai Gon there were quite a few SBMV, some real home made ones with salvaged phosphor from old, busted lamps...mostly Yttrium Orthovanadate, TriPhosphor and Halophoshor all mixed together [bit like lamp buzz-powder!], made for some kakky lime green sort of colours where the 546nm mercury line dominates all. I have a few samples saved, deep in the collection!

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

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Sep 14, 2016 at 04:34 PM Author: nogden
I have a few of those. I use them for theatre lighting, though they were also historically used for yard and sports field lighting. Only problem I've found with these is that the glass filament support can break off from the lead wires, taking the filament with it. I have at least one of these lamps never used with a broken filament from this problem.
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