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GE First Tungsten Halogen Floodlight

GE First Tungsten Halogen Floodlight

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Illustrated here is the first tungsten-halogen lamp to have been developed for general lighting applications, introduced by GE under its Quartzline brand in 1959. However it was not the first halogen lamp, since the year before in 1958 GE had launched an earlier Quartzline lamp for infrared heating applications, as well as the #1958 and #1959 miniature halogen lamps for aircraft wingtip illuminators.

The original halogen lamps were invented by Elmer Fridrich and Emmet Wiley, who had the idea to dose their infrared lamps with iodine to prevent blackening and extend the useful life. This lamp is also filled with iodine, but the chemistry and thermals were refined by Fred Mosby and Ed Zubler who were able to optimise the halogen cycle so as to allow its use to be extended to general lighting floodlight lamps of this kind. In the early 1970s the lamp chemistry and was refined again by Philips, who pioneered the use of bromine compounds to further improve lamp performance.

The mechanical construction of this lamp is also slightly different than modern equivalents. In particular the quartz-to-metal seals are especially primitive. Rather than employing the usual molybdenum sealing foils, GE pioneered a process of flattening a molybdenum pin into an ellipsoidal section, which was then electrochemically etched to produce the sharp knife-edges essential for achieving a good seal. The resulting one-part wire and seal assembly was technically superior, but the process ultimately turned out to be too expensive and within a few years GE halogen lamps reverted to the continuous strips of moly foil welded to a separate pin to carry the current into the lamp.

This particular lamp also marks the first ever use of the now ubiquitous R7s recessed single contact end caps, another of Mosby's inventions. Prior to this the earlier halogen and quartz lamps were either sealed into a second outer bulb equipped with a conventional cap, or had clumsy arrangements of metal straps wrapped around the lamp seals to provide an electromechanical contact, or even more basic wire terminals. Part of the reason for this was the high operating temperature of the ends of the lamp, which caused oxidation of most metals and led to a high contact resistance with the lampholder which may lead to arcing. With the R7s design this was overcome by silver plating the end contacts. The silver plating is gradually nitrided during the life of the lamp, but that is a relatively thin and non-adherent coating which does not interfere so severely with the contact resistance unless the lamp temperature is much higher again.

IN_P_GE-Mazda_1000PS52DB-120V.jpg TH_DE_GE_Q500T3CL.jpg IN WC D GE 105-200PS30DAY-E26.jpg IN R GE 120-100A21SB-E26.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:General Electric USA
Model Reference:Q500T3/CL
Lamp
Lamp Type:Halogen
Filament/Radiator Type:Tungsten
Base:R7s
Shape/Finish:T3
Service Life:2000 h
Electrical
Wattage:500 Watts
Voltage:120 Volts
Current:4.17 Amperes
Optical
Lumen Output:10,500 lm
Lumen Efficacy:21.0 lm/W
Color Temperature:3000 K
Color Rendering Index:Ra 100
Physical/Production
Dimensions:9.5mm diameter x 117.6mm contact length
Factory Location:Cuyahoga Lamp Plant, NELA Park, Cleveland OH, USA : http://www.lamptech.co.uk/Documents/Factory%20-%20US%20-%20Cuyahoga.htm
Fabrication Date:October 1964
Application/Use:Floodlighting

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Album name:James / Incandescent
Keywords:Lamps
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Date added:Nov 30, 2019
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merc
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Adam


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Nov 30, 2019 at 09:54 AM Author: merc
Thanks for posting this piece of history and an interesting reading.

Not a misoLEDist...

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Nov 30, 2019 at 10:49 AM Author: Max
As usual, this is a very interesting read James. If I remember correctly, Philips's tungsten-bromide lamp was the result of a co-operation between Eindhoven and Turnhout (this factory produced halogen and other special incandescent lamps before taking over Eindhoven's HID production in 1978-1981). Two key engineers were involved in this development, G. T'Jampens (belgium) and G. Prakken (Netherlands) - their original patent is NL7206616A. I had the pleasure of working with G. T'Jampens's son, Hans, when I was in Turnhout years ago.
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Robert


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Nov 30, 2019 at 11:00 AM Author: rjluna2
Nice presentation, James

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

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