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Little Rock 1959 Capitol Avenue with Westinghouse OV Mercuries

Little Rock 1959 Capitol Avenue with Westinghouse OV Mercuries

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My hometown with streets lined with Westinghouse OV Mercury Vapor fixtures. This was 1959 and AP&L was in a frenzy to upgrade all fixtures to mercury. AP&L used Westinghouse for their cobra fixtures from 1959 thru 1966 and Pemco enclosed 175W for their NEMA fixtures. Only when supplies could not meet the construction schedules would they use another manufacturer.

temple.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Westinghouse
Model Reference:OV
Lamp
Lamp Type:Mercury
Base:Mogul
Fixture
Fixture Type:Street
Ballast Type:Mercury
Socket Type:Porcelain Mercury Screw Shell
Physical/Production
Application/Use:Street/Roadway

File information

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Filename:temple.jpg
Album name:GE101R / Little Rock 1959 Capitol Avenue with Westinghouse OV Mercuries
Keywords:Lanterns
File Size:73 KB
Date added:Aug 24, 2019
Dimensions:700 x 510 pixels
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High Intensity
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EYE 175w MV


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Aug 24, 2019 at 09:22 PM Author: High Intensity
They look like OV-25's.

Old lighting is, and will always be, the best lighting.

GE101R
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Aug 24, 2019 at 09:30 PM Author: GE101R

They look like OV-25's.

What I was thinking as well. Look at how clean the city was and how neat things were placed. It isn't anymore.
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Aug 25, 2019 at 01:01 AM Author: Edmund Ironside
Hah! I can imagine all the lighting fans back in the day, screaming, being all dramatic over incandescent street lights dissapering in favor of mercury.

Made in Sweden

High Intensity
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Aug 25, 2019 at 04:02 AM Author: High Intensity
Yep, the 'New = Bad' mindset has been around for a long time if i were to guess, and i think a lot of it comes down to nostalgia. Which i can understand since a lot of HPS and SOX lighting out here has been replaced with LEDs which i find a bit sad but i realize that this is something a lot of technology goes through.

While i see why a lot of places chose LED over other lighting technologies, i'm not sure if it should be treated as the lighting cure-all a lot of companies pass it off as.

One thing i thought about a bit over a year ago was something along the lines of 'What if T8 fluorescent was phased out, how would people (collectors/fans) respond?'. An even better question now would be 'What if LED (streetlights or bulbs) were phased out?'. Because i think a decent chunk of people would start to miss it even if they may hate it today.

Old lighting is, and will always be, the best lighting.

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Aug 25, 2019 at 11:14 AM Author: GE101R

Hah! I can imagine all the lighting fans back in the day, screaming, being all dramatic over incandescent street lights dissapering in favor of mercury.

Actually not very many. The mercury vapor with it's super bright lumen output over incandescent was actually like discovering the planet was round. The shape and size of luminaries did not change as they are doing so now. The radial waves were really never well thought of and were considered basically "junk" with their open lamps. Many existing NEMA fixtures were simply retrofitted with mercury vapor ballast kits and the fixtures looked the same. No "shock" of the toy looking lightweight junk that you can find on websites.The lineman sometimes actually hung off the arms on the longer masts in order to re-lamp some fixtures. They were made to last and were of heavy gauge steel and aluminum. THAT is one reason they are still in service after 50+ years. Come back in 50 years and check out those flimsy LED's with their electronic ballasts and see how many are still around.
I rest my case.
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Aug 25, 2019 at 01:37 PM Author: streetlight98
A lot of people in residential areas did not like mercury vapor when it was gaining popularity in the late 50s and early 60s. People disliked the "ghoulish" blue light and the way it made skin look blood-drained. That's one of the reasons many towns here held onto their incandescent street lights in neighborhoods around here. Until the early 1990s, Rhode Island had a lot of low-output incandescent lights left (1000 and 2500 lumen varieties) and of course the 100, 175, 400, and 100W MV lights that lit more urban and suburban areas.

The only reason I like HPS is pure nostalgia. I remember watching the lamps warm up as a kid, purple at the pre-ignition stage, starting off greenish once the arc was struck, turning blue-white, shifting to a deep "LPS yellow", and transitioning over to the familiar peachy-orange color of GE HPS lamps. I thought it was cool how many colors were shown during warm-up. And as a young kid I would get excited when a HPS light on my block would cycle, as I'd get to see the warm up process over and over again during the evening and into the night. However, I don't miss the orange light at all and prefer the nice 3000K light of the LEDs now lighting my area. Other towns have used 4000K LEDs and I don't mind them on main roads and secondary roads but in neighborhoods I find the 4000K light cold and uninviting. I can totally see why people in the 50s and 60s preferred the warm glow of incandescent lighting over the cold white glow of MV. Of course that being said, MV is my favorite form of HID.

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

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Aug 25, 2019 at 04:29 PM Author: GE101R

A lot of people in residential areas did not like mercury vapor when it was gaining popularity in the late 50s and early 60s. People disliked the "ghoulish" blue light and the way it made skin look blood-drained. That's one of the reasons many towns here held onto their incandescent street lights in neighborhoods around here. Until the early 1990s, Rhode Island had a lot of low-output incandescent lights left (1000 and 2500 lumen varieties) and of course the 100, 175, 400, and 100W MV lights that lit more urban and suburban areas.

The only reason I like HPS is pure nostalgia. I remember watching the lamps warm up as a kid, purple at the pre-ignition stage, starting off greenish once the arc was struck, turning blue-white, shifting to a deep "LPS yellow", and transitioning over to the familiar peachy-orange color of GE HPS lamps. I thought it was cool how many colors were shown during warm-up. And as a young kid I would get excited when a HPS light on my block would cycle, as I'd get to see the warm up process over and over again during the evening and into the night. However, I don't miss the orange light at all and prefer the nice 3000K light of the LEDs now lighting my area. Other towns have used 4000K LEDs and I don't mind them on main roads and secondary roads but in neighborhoods I find the 4000K light cold and uninviting. I can totally see why people in the 50s and 60s preferred the warm glow of incandescent lighting over the cold white glow of MV. Of course that being said, MV is my favorite form of HID.

Not so much in my area. Most accepted the mercury with the added brightness of the streets. In 1962 AP&L started to rent 175 watt mercury vapor fixtures for $3.00 per month on their existing poles and 1.00 a month added if they had to set a pole for your installation. AP&L started with the Pemco enclosed globe fixture with the large glass refractors and Fisher Pierce tall twist lock model 6600-A photo controls. Later in the 60's they experimented with some LM and ended up migrating to the Westinghouse open bottom NEMA. They were everywhere and in the mid 1990's over 5000 were taken down and simply thrown in the dumpsters, hood, globe, lamp, photo control (some still had their original FP 6600). I know because I was amazed at watching them still in service when I came home periodically. I was very busy in another state with my electrical contracting business and it happened so quickly that I did not even know they had started the massive quick replacement of the mercury vapor's. I hardly ever see any of the Pemco's for sale anywhere and I have been looking for over 10 years.
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SodiumVapor 105843202020668111118 UCpGClK_9OH8N4QkD1fp-jNw majorpayne1226
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Aug 25, 2019 at 05:12 PM Author: HomeBrewLamps
These lights have a certain elegance to them that isn't matched by most setups elsewhere I've seen. Westinghouse knew how to build a light and your city knew what poles to pick.

~Owen

Mercury Vapor LampHigh Pressure Sodium Scavenger, Urban Explorer, Lighting Enthusiast and Creator of homebrewlamps Cool High Pressure SodiumMercury Vapor Lamp

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Aug 25, 2019 at 05:19 PM Author: GE101R

These lights have a certain elegance to them that isn't matched by most setups elsewhere I've seen. Westinghouse knew how to build a light and your city knew what poles to pick.

Thanks. I wish I had that convertible in the photo.
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Robert


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Aug 25, 2019 at 05:28 PM Author: rjluna2
I spy 1958 Chevrolet Bel Air Impala Convertible here

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

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Aug 25, 2019 at 05:29 PM Author: GE101R

I spy 1958 Chevrolet Bel Air Impala Convertible here

Love it!
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