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Electromechanical Fair-Play BB-200 Basketball Scoreboard In Use

Electromechanical Fair-Play BB-200 Basketball Scoreboard In Use


Here is a Fair-Play BB-200 basketball scoreboard that I am testing after making some adjustments and cleaning. It is in the gymnasium right next to my office in the school where I work. I've walked by it a thousand times and never really paid any attention to it until I was asked to repair it. This is entirely electromechanically-controlled; it has no ICs or semiconductors except for a few diodes. It is really a neat work of electrical art and fun to watch too!

I just bought a new used clock pak on eBay. When it arrives, I'll clean it and repair the rotary selectors if necessary. Then this clock will be back in perfect working order. It is working as-is, but it still bugs me that some of the seconds lamps are a little flaky.

Kudos to Fair-Play for posting the schematic of this scoreboard on their Web site!

Video:
In the first segment, I turn on and off the bonus lamps. The clunks are coming from the relays inside the scoreboard. Then I add scores to home and visitor. The clunks are from the rotary selectors inside the scoreboard that advance each time I advance the score. The hum heard in the video is not related to the scoreboard -- it is from our overhead paging system.

In the second segment, I turn on the clock start switch on the BB-2 control console. The clicks are from the switches inside the console sending pulses to the scoreboard to advance the rotary selectors to count down seconds. The clunks are from the rotary selectors in the scoreboard advancing.

In the third segment, I removed the cover from the clock pak (located under the "Period" panel in the scoreboard). The rotary selector on top controls the tens of seconds, selector on the bottom controls the minutes. The selector for the seconds units is behind the seconds tens selector.

In the fourth segment, I put one minute on the clock and start counting down. There are no burned out lamps in the clock; some of the contacts are dirty, misadjusted, or broken on the seconds rotary selector. As the clock counts down, I add scores to each side. Then I advance the period lights. Lastly, I turn on the home bonus light. Don't know why the horn didn't sound at the end, though. Either I didn't turn it on or it has another dirty contact.

Lamp compliment:
Score and clock lamps are #161 wedge base lamps.
Bonus lamps are 25A19/IF
Period lamps are 7.5S11/CW (Ceramic white)
Home and Visitor lamps are supposed to be 11S14/IF, but we've used 15A15/IF-130V since that's what we had on hand. Yeah, I know there are a few burned out, I need to order some more.

GTE_Sylvanias~4.JPG Philips_Westys.JPG youtube_njeYekvuUP4.jpg 10S6.JPG

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Fair-Play
Model Reference:BB-200
Electrical
Wattage:800 Watts
Physical/Production
Fabrication Date:Probably Late 1960s

File information

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Album name:nogden / Incandescent - Other
Keywords:Miscellaneous
File Size:16 KB
Date added:Nov 18, 2012
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DieselNut
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John


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Nov 18, 2012 at 06:03 PM Author: DieselNut
Awesome! I love it!

Preheat Fluorescents forever!
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icefoglights
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Nov 18, 2012 at 06:35 PM Author: icefoglights
Wow that's a very interesting video! I never realized how loud these were. It's not usually quiet enough to hear them when they are in use.

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nogden
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Nelson Ogden


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Nov 18, 2012 at 07:07 PM Author: nogden
Yeah I was surprised at how loud it is too. The design of the scoreboard cabinet probably helps to amplify the sound of its mechanisms. If isolated, the relays and selectors probably wouldn't be too loud. I'd love to hear a step-by-step telephone office since step-by-step switches are simply cascades of rotary selectors. It would probably sound like this scoreboard only x100!

Most boards, even light bulb boards, are controlled by ICs and triacs, so they are silent. This is the only scoreboard in our district that is electromechanical.
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Nov 30, 2012 at 07:05 PM Author: jercar954
Fabulous video! Never knew how this worked and what type of lamps used.

Preheat and T-12 fluorescents forever! Down with LED's and instant start T-8 fluorescents.

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Nov 30, 2012 at 07:46 PM Author: sol
@nogden : There are old videos (with sound) of step-by-step telephone exchange switches operating on YouTube, if you're interested. Although not the same as being there in person, it is still impressive. Back in 1995, I saw a small-scale step-by-step switch in use in person at the Science and Technology museum in Ottawa, Ontario. Since it is small scale, the noise is less than a large exchange on Christmas Day, but still gives an idea (somewhat anyhow...).

Modern telephone exchanges (and old ones that have been renovated) are all controlled by silent computers.
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May 16, 2014 at 10:00 PM Author: themaritimegirl
That's really cool!

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nogden
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May 17, 2014 at 04:31 PM Author: nogden
Thanks! I finally replaced the clock pak so more of the lamps are working correctly. There are still a few segments that don't always work but it is certainly useable. I also finally replaced some of the home and visitor backlighting lamps! We still use this board regularly.
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Feb 15, 2020 at 01:33 AM Author: mobilite
in 1989 i was a janitor at a Jr High school, the score clock was unused because lots of the bulbs had burnt out, the clock was unreadable when counting. The school board maintenance guys had thir lift in the gym to fix fluorescent lights, I asked them to leave it with me for the weekend so I could fix the score clock, they didn't want to fiddle with it. about 2 dozen 12 volt bulbs later it was back in business. Phys Ed teacher said it hadn't worked in 10 years.
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Feb 15, 2020 at 07:05 AM Author: nogden
Nice! Glad you could save it.
fluorescent lover 40
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Westinghouse OV-25s at sunset.


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Feb 25, 2020 at 08:51 PM Author: fluorescent lover 40
Nice board! Love the T-slot it's plugged into!

Good quality things are awesome. Cheaply made things are not.

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