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Hubbell keyed switch

Hubbell keyed switch


Came across one of these by accident at Lowe's- didn't know they sold them. My high school had them in the hallways and I used to switch them with a guitar pick or small screwdriver. After much thought of where it would be possible to use this (almost all my switches are 3-way, and this one isn't), I decided install this to control my workbench and over-car-hood fluorescent lights (two 2x40w T12 & 2x75w slimline) which, for some reason, are on a dedicated 20-amp breaker. So, I can switch them "commercial style," either with the key switch or the breaker. When removing the old (normal) switch, I discovered the NM cable went straight through the box, with just enough cut out of it to expose the black wire which went to the switch terminals. The neutral & ground wires were kept uncut & sheathed. Never saw that before, but I kept it that way.

ALR Twist Lock photocontrol+.JPG ALR_Photocontrol+.JPG keyed_switch+.JPG Silver_FP_Photocontrol+.JPG

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Filename:keyed_switch+.JPG
Album name:arcblue / Lighting controls
Keywords:Gear
File Size:51 KB
Date added:Mar 12, 2015
Dimensions:640 x 478 pixels
Displayed:263 times
URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-105552
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rjluna2
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Robert


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Mar 13, 2015 at 05:21 AM Author: rjluna2
That is cool you have one at your workbench

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

Prismatic
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Mar 13, 2015 at 07:50 AM Author: Prismatic
I like the desing of this US switches. Something you never find here in Austria. Ours look like like these:
http://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-75732

Prismatic@YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/slprismatic

streetlight98
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Mike McCann


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Mar 14, 2015 at 07:12 PM Author: streetlight98
Very cool! I didn't know they sold these either! Do they come with a key or no? Would be cool to get one of these. I've always wanted to switch these, but was afraid using a metal object would shock me. So the real keys are actually metal? I guess there's no harm in using something metal then. I usually use a pen cap lol.

To resist is to piss in the wind, anyone who does will end up smelling.

icefoglights
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ITT Low Pressure Sodium NEMA


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May 06, 2015 at 08:26 PM Author: icefoglights
I thought this was a push-button switch at first

01010010 01101111 01100010 01100101 01110010 01110100

Ash
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May 06, 2015 at 11:24 PM Author: Ash
Cool switch

Its not uncommon here in Israel to find wires going straight through a box. Our wiring is made as single wires pulled into conduit, so you can pull through the wires that are not connected to anything and have less connections

And i agree with Prismatic. We have either the "traditional" European 55mm round box mounted switches, or the "Italian" modular units like Gewiss/Bticino.The latter are nice but are proprietary - once you install a box you can only install a switch from the same manufacturer in it. You in the US have a standard modular system that all manufacturers are compatible with
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Zack


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Nov 16, 2018 at 02:07 PM Author: Fluorescent05
My school uses a different style of keyed switch made by Leviton. It requires a metal key with a few 90 degree bends in it. I looked it up online and found the correct key for them and bent a paperclip into that shape with pliers. I can't wait to test it on Monday.

Don't be fooLED, T8 IS the worst thing to do to a magnetic T12 fixture.

fluorescent lover 40
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Lights are awesome! :)


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Nov 16, 2018 at 07:05 PM Author: fluorescent lover 40
There's a keyed switch in the boys' bathroom in my school that people can shut off with their fingers!

Current: US 120v 60hz
Power provider: Southern California Edison (SCE)

-Date decoder of some US lamps 1960-present.
-I'll save any vintage lamp... dead or alive! Smiley

sol
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Nov 16, 2018 at 07:09 PM Author: sol
There are about a dozen different styles of standard keys for tamper resistant switches. Notice how I said tamper resistant and not tamper proof. They are merely to prevent casual operation by the public. Most keys are available separately, some types can operate more than one type of switch.

Tamper proof switches exist and are much more expensive. They typically operate on low voltage and use a mortise cylinder which can use a high security key and can be integrated in the building’s master key system. They are rarely used for lighting but mostly for security system override (fire alarm, security system, access control, etc) which are more sensitive than lighting. For more information, Google mortise cylinder switch.

Now, Fluorescent05, don’t get in trouble with your fabricated key...
paintballer22
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120V/240V 60hz


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Nov 16, 2018 at 07:44 PM Author: paintballer22
I was able to turn off the lights in my school with a paper clip. It was always the main hall lights that had the key switches the bathrooms was a regular toggle switch. I would turn off the hall lights at least twice a week during the school day. I never got caught by the faculty.
Fluorescent05
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Zack


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Nov 16, 2018 at 08:01 PM Author: Fluorescent05

There are about a dozen different styles of standard keys for tamper resistant switches. Notice how I said tamper resistant and not tamper proof. They are merely to prevent casual operation by the public. Most keys are available separately, some types can operate more than one type of switch.

Tamper proof switches exist and are much more expensive. They typically operate on low voltage and use a mortise cylinder which can use a high security key and can be integrated in the building’s master key system. They are rarely used for lighting but mostly for security system override (fire alarm, security system, access control, etc) which are more sensitive than lighting. For more information, Google mortise cylinder switch.

Now, Fluorescent05, don’t get in trouble with your fabricated key...

It's a replica of a Leviton 55500-PRT key. I guess the school figured that normal tamper resistant switches weren't enough to stop kids, so they had to use these. I bet I'll be the first one to beat the system.

Don't be fooLED, T8 IS the worst thing to do to a magnetic T12 fixture.

streetlight98
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Nov 16, 2018 at 08:52 PM Author: streetlight98
My elementary school and middle school had tamper resistant switches similar to these. I used to use a filed-down pen cap tail to switch the lights on and off lol. My high school had regular switches throughout though, except for the MH uplights in the main foyer and library. I have a Cooper/Arrow-Hart 2-pole (240V) tamper resistant switch (box says brown but it's got a bare metal face) and a Leviton 3-way version in ivory. Both were NOS buys on eBay.

To resist is to piss in the wind, anyone who does will end up smelling.

LampLover
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Nov 24, 2018 at 10:15 PM Author: LampLover
I remember these type of key switches from my high school days. I remember I was the only one at the time who knew how to turn off the lights when it was time to watch a VHS (Yes a VCR tape as I was in High School from 1998-2002)

I remember using a paper clip as I once saw the custodian using the actual key which was also made of metal.

I have always wondered what the interior looks like, the actual switch mechanism must be behind an insulator or something but I have never seen an inside view of a switch like this.


I do believe the lighting was 277VAC and the ballasts were instant start, I do remember seeing a rapid start system at the elementary school I attended. So when I went to high school I was surprised that there was no start up flicker

I am going on what I remember and what I know now about the different types of fluorescent ballasts

LED Free Zone!
All For HID and old-school electronic Only

Fluorescent05
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Zack


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Nov 26, 2018 at 03:16 PM Author: Fluorescent05

My elementary school and middle school had tamper resistant switches similar to these. I used to use a filed-down pen cap tail to switch the lights on and off lol. My high school had regular switches throughout though, except for the MH uplights in the main foyer and library. I have a Cooper/Arrow-Hart 2-pole (240V) tamper resistant switch (box says brown but it's got a bare metal face) and a Leviton 3-way version in ivory. Both were NOS buys on eBay.

Do you have pictures of those?

Don't be fooLED, T8 IS the worst thing to do to a magnetic T12 fixture.

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