Return to the thumbnail page Display/hide file information See previous file See next file

Osglim 5W Neon Beehive Lamp

Osglim 5W Neon Beehive Lamp

Click to view full size image

Ebay win for £5.50, seen one sell for £93 before! An interesting vintage neon lamp with a spiral shaped electrode, presumably just used as an indicator or night light?

DSCF6943.JPG DSCF6547.JPG DSCF6308.JPG DSCF3491.JPG

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Osram-GEC
Lamp
Lamp Type:Neon
Electrical
Wattage:5W

File information

File information

Download: Download this File
Filename:DSCF6308.JPG
Album name:SuperSix / Gear / Starter Switches / Accessories
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:364 KB
Date added:May 03, 2011
Dimensions:1485 x 2048 pixels
Displayed:494 times
URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-54251
Favorites:Add to Favorites
Comments
Pyte
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
View Posts
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
May 03, 2011 at 12:33 PM Author: Pyte
In my opinion if one electrode is much shorter than the other, it is a polarity indicator, otherwise that is a beehive-glow lamp for spare-lighting.

LED-lighting is pseudoscience.
LED-lighting is only a generated demand.
LED-lighting came to life simply by business interest.

sox35
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Female
View Posts
View Gallery

Mainly the electrical side of things


missriaelaine
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
May 16, 2018 at 12:36 PM Author: sox35
I used to have one of these, never seen any around of late, though

Ria in Aberdeen
It'll be all right in the end, and if it isn't all right, it isn't the end Smiley

HomeBrewLamps
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
View Posts
View Gallery


SodiumVapor 105843202020668111118 UCpGClK_9OH8N4QkD1fp-jNw majorpayne1226 187567902@N04/
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
May 16, 2018 at 01:20 PM Author: HomeBrewLamps
I wonder if I'll find one of these things on one of my trips to abandoned places....

~Owen

Color changing lamp Scavenger, Urban Explorer, Lighting Enthusiast and Creator of homebrewlamps Cool Color changing lamp

Mandolin Girl
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Female
View Posts
View Gallery

Mainly the mechanical side of things


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jan 13, 2020 at 02:54 PM Author: Mandolin Girl
You lucky, lucky man.!

Hugs and STUFF Sammi xXx (also in Aberdeen)

There are two kinds of light  -  the glow that illuminates, and the glare that obscures.
James Thurber  -  US author, cartoonist, humourist, & satirist (1894 - 1961)

Globe Collector
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
View Posts
View Gallery

Preserving the Brightest Ideas of Our Age


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jan 13, 2020 at 03:23 PM Author: Globe Collector
You won't ever find one of these in the United States Owen.....this specific type is as British as roast beef! You might find some Noth American equivalent however, probably in an S bulb.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

Mandolin Girl
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Female
View Posts
View Gallery

Mainly the mechanical side of things


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jan 13, 2020 at 04:14 PM Author: Mandolin Girl
I just wish we could find one here in the UK now...

Hugs and STUFF Sammi xXx (also in Aberdeen)

There are two kinds of light  -  the glow that illuminates, and the glare that obscures.
James Thurber  -  US author, cartoonist, humourist, & satirist (1894 - 1961)

Mr. Orthosilicate
Jr. Member
**
Offline

Gender: Male
View Posts
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jan 13, 2020 at 04:24 PM Author: Mr. Orthosilicate
Just be glad you have all these cool neon lamps in the UK. 120v here in America isn’t enough to make really large, cool neon lamps, since the electrode distance and the gas fill pressure have to be kept small in order to ensure breakdown occurs with only 120v, or about 170v peak.
Globe Collector
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
View Posts
View Gallery

Preserving the Brightest Ideas of Our Age


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jan 13, 2020 at 04:46 PM Author: Globe Collector
Incorrect, unfortunately....

Most neons fire between 90 and 180v depending on electrode geometry. At 120v )peal value 160v)it is is far easier to get the much lower value and power rated series resiator inside the base of the lamp than it is in the 240v realms.

This is why "Aerolux" lamps were such a "thing" in the United states, but not elsewhere in the World!

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

Lightingguy1994
Hero Member
*****
Online

View Posts
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Online)
Jan 13, 2020 at 05:08 PM Author: Lightingguy1994
Buy a 230v one from EU and run it off of a ballast that has ocv of around 230v

I got a Robertson 1xF30/40 preheat NPF ballast. It's ocv is about 230v
Mandolin Girl
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Female
View Posts
View Gallery

Mainly the mechanical side of things


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jan 13, 2020 at 05:11 PM Author: Mandolin Girl

Buy a 240v one from EU and run it off of a ballast that has ocv of around 240v

Easier said than done.! We have been looking for years

Hugs and STUFF Sammi xXx (also in Aberdeen)

There are two kinds of light  -  the glow that illuminates, and the glare that obscures.
James Thurber  -  US author, cartoonist, humourist, & satirist (1894 - 1961)

Lightingguy1994
Hero Member
*****
Online

View Posts
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Online)
Jan 13, 2020 at 05:13 PM Author: Lightingguy1994
If i see one online i'll tell you
Mandolin Girl
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Female
View Posts
View Gallery

Mainly the mechanical side of things


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jan 13, 2020 at 05:14 PM Author: Mandolin Girl

If i see one online i'll tell you

Thank you, so much.!!

Hugs and STUFF Sammi xXx (also in Aberdeen)

There are two kinds of light  -  the glow that illuminates, and the glare that obscures.
James Thurber  -  US author, cartoonist, humourist, & satirist (1894 - 1961)

Mr. Orthosilicate
Jr. Member
**
Offline

Gender: Male
View Posts
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jan 13, 2020 at 06:54 PM Author: Mr. Orthosilicate

Incorrect, unfortunately....

Most neons fire between 90 and 180v depending on electrode geometry. At 120v )peal value 160v)it is is far easier to get the much lower value and power rated series resiator inside the base of the lamp than it is in the 240v realms.

This is why "Aerolux" lamps were such a "thing" in the United states, but not elsewhere in the World!


That’s interesting. It makes sense that the lamps would be more efficient since the resistor doesn’t have to drop an extra 60v versus a lamp on 120. I’ve always seen the large neons designed for 240v, most of the 120v ones I’ve seen were indicators.

I actually thought that the lamps with figures in them were more of a British thing. I didn’t realize they were so popular here. You learn something new every day.

Also, that reminds me that I need to get around to reading that book on gas discharge physics I bought. Aside from the fact that the voltage across the discharge does not vary linearly with the electrode distance, I don’t know too much about them.
Globe Collector
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
View Posts
View Gallery

Preserving the Brightest Ideas of Our Age


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jan 13, 2020 at 11:51 PM Author: Globe Collector
I you were to attempt to use this specific lamp, (called colloquially a "Beehive Neon") in a 120v realm, you would follow this logical procedure:

1. Connect it to the 120v supply as is and see if it lights at all, if it does, then move to the next step.

2. Open up the base by sucking and wicking the solder/lead from the contact "lutes" on the base to open the lead-in holes.

3. Place the lamp cap up in a beaker. Cover the etch with a thick dollop of Vasiline and inject concentrated sodium hydroxide solution in through the lead-in holes in the base lutes with a hypodermic syringe and needle (blunted off on some wet and dry). Mind not to push the needle against the exhaust tube and accidentally break it.

4. Leave it for a few days to dissolve the binder of the heat-cured cement, (you might also need to fill the beaker with sodium hydroxide solution too right up to the base and weigh the lamp down to stop it floating up. This will prevent the sodium hydroxide solution in the base gradually draining down the bulb as it dissolves the binder out.)

5. Remove lamp, rinse it off, inject water into base, (using the syringe and needle) to displace all the remaining sodium hydroxide and "Sodium Binderate" that has formed. Carefully tap base loose with a small screwdriver handle to reveal the (now ruined) resistor inside.

6. Calculate the new value of resistor required, it needs to lint to about 5mA. It will be a lot less than the original, which would be sort of 18-27K in a 240v realm. In the 120v realm it would be more like 820 Ohms to 1.2Kish.

7. After fitting new resistor, re glue-base with two part epoxy mixed with the old filler that has been cleaned and dried.


Yes, Mr. Orthosilicate, you have the correct idea, much less voltage drop, sameish current, much less power dissipation.

I think you will find the plasma physics book intriguing and hope it leads you in to further quires and discoveries.


Somewhere here somebody posted up a Coronation Neon...a lamp I have investigated in great detail when the base of one of mine "Conveniently" fell off revealing the internal node between the (large) resistor and the lamp proper. I try to find the post and link to it...here it is.

Just type "Coronation Neon" into the "Search" function to see more examples.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

migette1
Jr. Member
**
Offline

Gender: Male
View Posts
View Gallery

Peter


migette1
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jan 14, 2020 at 03:36 AM Author: migette1
Some good comments, yes this type bee hive or bienenkorb are seen in Europe in several types Siemens made a nice one with plates rather then the spiral, another is in a frosted envelope, and some do not even have a resistor included so any you do not know use a variac and at 50v will strike go above that arcing accurs and then death to the lamp. Are they rare? I remember these when a kid being sold for 4 shillings and 8 pence not common but sold by good electrical stores, these were also used with red filter for film work. Will put some up showing the variety in these. I have been collecting for many years over 70 years so have got quite a few, but still more types to get....hopefully.

Interested in the history of electric lighting and incandescent in particular and neon glow lamps.

sox35
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Female
View Posts
View Gallery

Mainly the electrical side of things


missriaelaine
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jan 14, 2020 at 09:49 AM Author: sox35
Peter, they are ultra rare these days, at least in this country. I've been looking for more years than I care to remember

Ria in Aberdeen
It'll be all right in the end, and if it isn't all right, it isn't the end Smiley

Globe Collector
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
View Posts
View Gallery

Preserving the Brightest Ideas of Our Age


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jan 15, 2020 at 01:18 AM Author: Globe Collector
The partial reason for the rediculous prices of 93 pounds is the "Osglim Effect".

I will elicidate, years ago in some "alternative health" publication....you know, "crystal healing" and "Prymid power" and all that mumbo jumbo...well an Osglim neon was specified as a part of an "Aura Photographing Machine"....and all the "Cranks" wanted specifically "Osglim"....if that word was on the box it was immediately five times dearer.


I went up against such a "Crank" an an Auction once for a pre 1919 crown exhaust tipped letter "E" Osglim...had to pay AU$120 to save it from a fate worse than psudo-religeous cultisim.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

© 2005-2020 Lighting-Gallery.net | Powered by: Coppermine Photo Gallery