Return to the thumbnail page Display/hide file information See previous file See next file

SLO Cone inside

SLO Cone inside

Click to view full size image

SLO Cone inside. With Helvar ballast and very old Airam HglX MV lamp.

image~5.jpg image~4.jpg image~0.jpg image.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:SLO/ Mäntsälän Metalli Oy
Model Reference:8171-5
Lamp
Base:E27
Fixture
Ballast Type:Conventional Helvar
Location:Park
Electrical
Wattage:125W
Voltage:220V
Physical/Production
Factory Location:Mäntsälä, Finland
Fabrication Date:1984

File information

File information

Download: Download this File
Filename:image~0.jpg
Album name:Ricu / My Collection
Keywords:Lanterns
File Size:520 KB
Date added:Jun 30, 2015
Dimensions:2465 x 1841 pixels
Displayed:264 times
URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-109840
Favorites:Add to Favorites
Comments
Ash
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Posts: 3669
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 30, 2015 at 12:18 PM Author: Ash
The lamp appears to be intended for cap up work, not like here. Could be with older type of phosphor - Does it light in colder light than today's lamps ?

The rest of the construction looks simple but i think it is vulnerable to UV damage, those wires and terminal blocks can't like to be in the vicinity of the lamp

I wonder, does the gear cast any significant dark spot at the base when this is lit ?
Ricu
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 0
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 09, 2016 at 05:31 PM Author: Ricu
Actually, that would open up the bottom. There was 5mm Allen key. On the cap was one bolt. The lamp was Airam HgLX 125W "soft glass lamp" -what does it mean? The arc tube have resistors with both ends !? Why?

The lamp is very old, maybe in the 80's and does not work anymore ..

A small shadow remains of the dome surface of the ballast, but I guess not harm. Opal bowl pave the light well.
Ash
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Posts: 3669
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 10, 2016 at 12:41 AM Author: Ash
How does the opening at the base go over the gear and lamp ?

Here we have some cone lanterns of different type, they basically install on the same type of base as plastic sphere covers. They are intended to be opened at the bottom, but more often than not i see the top covers held in place with self tapping screws (instead of the factory rivets) i.e. maintenance personnel prefer to open them from the top. Maybe as the screws in the base seize or something

Soft Glass lamp means that it is not intended for thermal stress. For example it cannot be used in open lanterns outdoors (nowadays it is done with cheap lamps as there may not be anything better on the market, but there is higher risk of the lamp shattering)

The resistors on both ends are for more reliable starting, in case 1 electrode fails or in very cold weather
Ricu
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 0
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 17, 2016 at 08:23 AM Author: Ricu
So, the black part of the post slides down. There is locked with one Allen screw, which presses against the column. If the cone-column is used, need to open the luminaire roof. If you want to change the bowl, you must first remove the entire lamp body: / The structure is of the same type, as Järnkonst 'Chinese Hat' -Lanterns. Chinese Hat -Lanterns ballast have centrally above of the bulb, the next generation ballast have above too, but the other side of the bulb and the capacitor is the second side.
Thank you Ash, to letting the Soft glass bulb. I did not know anything about it before. Does the old lamp work, if I install it with starter?
Ash
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Posts: 3669
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 17, 2016 at 02:01 PM Author: Ash
It might work, but i guess it will push the lamp further up into EOL or non-start-ability after a while

Also, the MBF lamp alone is short circuit proof - There is no likely fault mode that would make the lamp into a dead short. Starter can fail in dead short - And after not long while overheat the ballast. If that is left for long, it will self destruct. If the power drops and lamp cycles, the starter remains connected alone across the ballast, and it will click with quite big arcing in the glow lamp - Which may make it weld together (Atleast as long as it is not a UK 125W starter, but ordinary 4..65 one)



The Jarnkonst Chinese Hats i seen on the gallery here are translucent, How bad is the shadow from the ballast in there ? And is the lamp there sideways too or vertical ?
Ricu
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 0
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 17, 2016 at 02:55 PM Author: Ricu
Thanks for the information. It would be fun to get a bulb work.

Chinese Hats will not have a shade to ballast, because the ballast is above the bulb in the roof. The lamp is horizontal, as in this model.
Ash
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Posts: 3669
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 17, 2016 at 02:59 PM Author: Ash
What about shadows from wires/connectors ?
Ricu
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 0
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 20, 2016 at 03:07 PM Author: Ricu
I do not know. Probably will not significantly harm
Ricu
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 0
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 20, 2016 at 03:19 PM Author: Ricu
The lamp holder bracket have the hole in the end. Its place of the ignitor for HPS or MH -versions.
Ash
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Posts: 3669
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 20, 2016 at 04:33 PM Author: Ash
Makes sense - There it does not add much more shadow than there allready is, and its not too hot place either




Posts:
View Gallery

View Profile Email
Jan 27, 2019 at 10:17 AM Author:
Ricu, you have photo of this HgL lamp?
Globe Collector
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 26
View Gallery

Preserving the Brightest Ideas of Our Age


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Sep 03, 2019 at 05:35 PM Author: Globe Collector
Soft glass is not weather resistant as Ash says...it is just soda-lime glass made by dissolving sodium carbonsate and calcium hydroxide in the silicon dioxide melt to bring the softening temperature down. It has a high coefficient of thermal expansion so it does not like sudden temperature changes.

All sorts of glassware from drinking glasses to drink bottles are made from it as it is cheap and easily worked.

The other type of glass commonly used is "Hard Glass"...sometimes known under the trade name "Pyrex" it contains boron oxide as well as differeing amounts of the other compounds mentioned above...this raises its softening point and makes it harder to work...but it has a much lower thermal coefficient of expansion, so if subjected to thermal shock...i.e, sudden temperature changes...it is far less likely to shatter as the internal stresses generated are far less. It is used to make laboratory glassware, cookware and preserving jars...as well as lamps of course.

Again, the two starting resistors and electrodes are, as Ash has said already...for reliable starting at low temperatures, which would be important in Finland.

I have mercury lamps in my collection with the starting electrodes at each end, but only one is fitted with the resistor...so spot welding the resistor assembly in must add more to the cost of the lamp than adding the extra electrode and molybdenum seal to the arc tube.

The arc tubes in these are made of pure silicon dioxide with NO sodium, calcium or boron oxide added. The melting point is very high///c1850*C and they are difficult to work as the softening range is very small...i.e, it melts fairly suddenly into a low viscosity liquid like ice melting rather than going through a stage like honey....however the coefficient of thermal expansion is so small one can plunge red hot silica into cold water with no ill effets...but it is very hard to work and passes short wave UV Light.

Very beautiful lamp by the way. This "high shouldered" shape is very rare. I hope you have kept it safe, despite it being E.O.L.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

© 2005-2019 Lighting-Gallery.net | Powered by: Coppermine Photo Gallery