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GFCI in powder room

GFCI in powder room

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This GFCI cuts power to both other bathroom outlets, the outside outlet, and the kitchen outlets because none of them were GFCIs before we installed them. (The previous owners were clueless about electricity) And yes the switch plate was painted over without it even being taken off.

20190103_210318.jpg 20181109_122221.jpg 20181102_195516.jpg 20180825_080708.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Unknown
Model Reference:Unknown
Lamp
Base:Screw Terminals
Shape/Finish:Light Almond
Service Life:A long time
Fixture
Fixture Type:Switch Box
Electrical
Voltage:120 Volts
Current:15/20 Amps Max
Optical
Lumen Output:Depends on what's plugged into it
Physical/Production
Fabrication Date:Unknown, please date

File information

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Filename:20181102_195516.jpg
Album name:Fluorescent05 / Miscellaneous Electrical Stuff
Keywords:Miscellaneous
File Size:115 KB
Date added:Nov 04, 2018
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fluorescent lover 40
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Lights are awesome! :)


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Nov 04, 2018 at 08:36 PM Author: fluorescent lover 40
I remember seeing a 1970's Arrow snap switch painted only half way. The cover was painted without being taken off. It was also installed upside down!

Power provider: Southern California Edison (SCE)

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Nov 06, 2018 at 07:18 PM Author: Cole D.
I don't know, but looks like it could be an older Leviton GFCI from the 1970 or 1980s. The old ones were sideways like that. Although the very first ones had one round and one rectangle buttons. The more modern Leviton GFCI style I think came out in 1985 or so.

Collect vintage incandescent and fluorescent fixtures. Also like HID lighting and streetlights.

Fluorescent05
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Zack


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Nov 06, 2018 at 08:21 PM Author: Fluorescent05
My house was built in 1983 or 1984.

Don't be fooLED, T8 IS the worst thing to do to a magnetic T12 fixture.

streetlight98
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Mike McCann


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Nov 06, 2018 at 08:48 PM Author: streetlight98
You said there were no GFCIs before you installed this one... Did you get this used because this is an early GFCI like Cole mentioned. Also, being a house from 1984, the bathroom receptacle circuits would have had to be GFCI protected back when the house was first wired as well as the exterior plugs (receptacles). However, kitchen plugs were NOT required to be GFCI protected until 1987, and at that time it only applied to plugs within 6ft of the sink. It wasn't until 1996 that all kitchen plugs were required to be GFCI protected.

Also, it appears by 1984, two kitchen receptacle circuits were required for countertop plugs, meaning the GFCI here should not trip anything in the kitchen. BTW, by "powder room" are you referring to a half bathroom with just a toilet and sink? If so perhaps the bathroom circuit code didn't apply. Info on past editions of the NEC is sparse. By today's standards the wiring sounds like it's all wrong (but grandfathered in so long as it was done to code when it was wired)

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

Cole D.
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Nov 06, 2018 at 09:04 PM Author: Cole D.
My grandma's house built in 1978 had two GFCI breakers. I think one was for the bathrooms and outside outlets and maybe one for the garage?

My other grandparent's house was built in 1995. There's a Leviton GFCI in the kitchen that protects the outlets on each side of the sink. The others are on a separate circuit. There's also a GFCI in the laundry room that protects the ones in there and outside. My grandma and grandpa's bathrooms are protected but not must be either on GFCI breakers or another circuit because there aren't GFCI outlets in either one.

My parent's old house was built in 1992. It had a GFCI in the kitchen for the outlets by the sink. Again, I don't remember there being GFCIs in the bathrooms, so I think they were on breakers.

I know I've seen a house from the early 80s with a GFCI just like that in the bathroom. Plus I've seen houses from the 90s with sideways Eagle GFCIs.

Collect vintage incandescent and fluorescent fixtures. Also like HID lighting and streetlights.

Fluorescent05
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Nov 06, 2018 at 09:28 PM Author: Fluorescent05

You said there were no GFCIs before you installed this one... Did you get this used because this is an early GFCI like Cole mentioned. Also, being a house from 1984, the bathroom receptacle circuits would have had to be GFCI protected back when the house was first wired as well as the exterior plugs (receptacles). However, kitchen plugs were NOT required to be GFCI protected until 1987, and at that time it only applied to plugs within 6ft of the sink. It wasn't until 1996 that all kitchen plugs were required to be GFCI protected.

Also, it appears by 1984, two kitchen receptacle circuits were required for countertop plugs, meaning the GFCI here should not trip anything in the kitchen. BTW, by "powder room" are you referring to a half bathroom with just a toilet and sink? If so perhaps the bathroom circuit code didn't apply. Info on past editions of the NEC is sparse. By today's standards the wiring sounds like it's all wrong (but grandfathered in so long as it was done to code when it was wired)

This protected every outlet in a wet location and was here before we moved in. We installed separate GFCIs for every wet location. And we might be replacing it so I might get to add it to my collection! And yes I mean half bath by powder room.

Don't be fooLED, T8 IS the worst thing to do to a magnetic T12 fixture.

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Nov 06, 2018 at 09:33 PM Author: streetlight98
If you installed multiple GFCIs on the same circuit, did you make sure to not use the "load" terminals on the GFCI? If you have two GFCIs inline with each other it will cause problems (like lack of GFCI protection or nuisance tripping) and is a code violation. If it really is all one circuit, you only need one GFCI.

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

Fluorescent05
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Nov 06, 2018 at 09:38 PM Author: Fluorescent05
Yes we used the line terminals but when this GFCI trips the other ones stop working. They must be wired to the load terminal output of this one.

Don't be fooLED, T8 IS the worst thing to do to a magnetic T12 fixture.

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Apr 25, 2019 at 08:31 PM Author: Fluorescent05

Yes we used the line terminals but when this GFCI trips the other ones stop working. They must be wired to the load terminal output of this one.

Is this a code violation?

Don't be fooLED, T8 IS the worst thing to do to a magnetic T12 fixture.

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Apr 25, 2019 at 08:45 PM Author: streetlight98
Yes it is a violation. We have failed inspections because of it. If one gfci trips the rest just keep the first one and do the rest as regular plugs. The one gfci will protect the whole circuit. We do that at work. Gfcis are expensive.

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

Fluorescent05
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Jul 19, 2019 at 10:08 AM Author: Fluorescent05

Yes it is a violation. We have failed inspections because of it. If one gfci trips the rest just keep the first one and do the rest as regular plugs. The one gfci will protect the whole circuit. We do that at work. Gfcis are expensive.

We didn't put those GFCIs in ourselves, when we hired contractors to do the other wet locations, they put GFCIs in without realizing that this would trip them.

Don't be fooLED, T8 IS the worst thing to do to a magnetic T12 fixture.

fluorescent lover 40
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Lights are awesome! :)


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Jul 19, 2019 at 10:34 AM Author: fluorescent lover 40
Do you know what brand the switch is?

Power provider: Southern California Edison (SCE)

-Date decoder of some US lamps 1960-present.
-Switch and receptacle collector.
-I'll save what I can! Smiley

Fluorescent05
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Jul 19, 2019 at 11:33 AM Author: Fluorescent05

Do you know what brand the switch is?

The light switch is a Leviton residential grade.

Don't be fooLED, T8 IS the worst thing to do to a magnetic T12 fixture.

Fluorescent05
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Sep 22, 2019 at 03:46 PM Author: Fluorescent05
This GFCI trips in one tenth of a second. Is this OK or should it be replaced? I have a nice NOS Cooper one I can install in its place. If I did replace it, of course I would keep it for my collection.

Don't be fooLED, T8 IS the worst thing to do to a magnetic T12 fixture.

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Sep 22, 2019 at 05:16 PM Author: streetlight98
If it still trips when the test button it pressed and the plastic isn't discolored from heat I say keep it in use until the bathroom is remodeled. If it was my own house I'd replace it just because I dislike GFCIs with the black and red buttons and don't care for the sideways slots. But that's just preference.

If you do replace the GFCI though, I would also replace the light switch and both faceplates so everything matches. A GFCI is like $18, a spec grade switch with framed toggle is around $1.50, and both plates together would be another $1.50.

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

Fluorescent05
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Sep 22, 2019 at 05:21 PM Author: Fluorescent05

If it still trips when the test button it pressed and the plastic isn't discolored from heat I say keep it in use until the bathroom is remodeled. If it was my own house I'd replace it just because I dislike GFCIs with the black and red buttons and don't care for the sideways slots. But that's just preference.

If you do replace the GFCI though, I would also replace the light switch and both faceplates so everything matches. A GFCI is like $18, a spec grade switch with framed toggle is around $1.50, and both plates together would be another $1.50.

I have a Cooper GFCI I can use. I honestly don't care that much about the plates and switch.

Don't be fooLED, T8 IS the worst thing to do to a magnetic T12 fixture.

Fluorescent05
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Oct 07, 2019 at 04:59 AM Author: Fluorescent05
LampLover found one of these.

Don't be fooLED, T8 IS the worst thing to do to a magnetic T12 fixture.

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120/240VAC @ 60HZ


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Oct 07, 2019 at 05:50 AM Author: LampLover

LampLover found one of these.


Yes I did!

LED Free Zone!
All For HID and old-school electronic Only

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Oct 08, 2019 at 12:11 AM Author: Ash

If you installed multiple GFCIs on the same circuit, did you make sure to not use the "load" terminals on the GFCI? If you have two GFCIs inline with each other it will cause problems (like lack of GFCI protection or nuisance tripping) and is a code violation. If it really is all one circuit, you only need one GFCI.

Wiring GFCI downstream from another GFCI can not cause lack of GFCI protection and can not cause nuisance tripping. The only problem is you can't predict which one will trip to fault
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