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Westinghouse Blackender lamps in early 1970s shoplight

Westinghouse Blackender lamps in early 1970s shoplight

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The blackened end is nearly nothing. The camera makes it look way worse than it actually is. These lamps don't have cathode guards. The light these are in has a GE Bonus Line ballast in it.

20180820_122935.jpg 20180820_122830.jpg 20180726_095523.jpg 20180809_212648.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Westinghouse
Lamp
Lamp Type:F40T12
Filament/Radiator Type:Preheat/Rapid Start
Base:Medium Bi-pin
Shape/Finish:T12
Fixture
Fixture Type:Fluorescent
Ballast Type:Magnetic
Socket Type:G13
Electrical
Wattage:40 Watt
Voltage:120 Volts (Primary of Ballast)
Current:0.8 Amps
Optical
Lumen Output:A lot
Color Temperature:Cool White
Physical/Production
Factory Location:USA
Fabrication Date:Early 1970s
Application/Use:Lighting the Garage

File information

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Filename:20180726_095523.jpg
Album name:Fluorescent05 / Light Fixtures
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:41 KB
Date added:Aug 17, 2018
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suzukir122
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Aug 17, 2018 at 11:20 AM Author: suzukir122
Ehh... I'd keep an eye on the blackened one just in case though. Unless that lamp end experienced moments with no
electrode filament heating during start up, that end does kinda look like it's reaching true EOL.
Almost looks as if the discharge is on the remaining 'good' portion of the electrode filament. If I'm right, that
lamps is actually very close to EOL.
But then again, a camera's capture can definitely be deceiving. Especially with the 120 hertz flicker in the way.
Any pinkish color/blue flashing?

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Lightingguy1994
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Aug 17, 2018 at 11:28 AM Author: Lightingguy1994
I'd keep an eye on the ballast also. Seems the GE magnetic ones can be very leaky even if they look new. Every fixture I come across that has them always has tar leakage.
suzukir122
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Aug 17, 2018 at 11:35 AM Author: suzukir122
@Lightingguy1994 brings up a good point. Which reminds me... I might want to keep an eye on my Trigger Start ballasted desk lamps.
Those ballasts are also from Valmont/GE, and they're also all high power factor. Most of them have a little tiny bit of tar leakage,
but none of which is serious at this point.

Interests
1. Motorcycles, Women, and Lighting (especially fluorescent)
2. Weighting/staying extremely athletic
3. Severe Thunderstorms of all kinds
4. Food and drinks. So gimme them bbq ribs
Yep
Lighting has been a passion of mine since I was born. I consider everyone on LG to be a friend

ace100w120v
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Aug 17, 2018 at 12:39 PM Author: ace100w120v
I've got one of those mid '70s BonusLine ballasts in an old shoplight and like others mentioned, those ballasts like to leak! Mine did long ago but still works very well. One of the brightest F40 ballasts I have.
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Aug 17, 2018 at 12:46 PM Author: Powell
Westinghouse didn't use shields but they had anode rods longer than most.

NNNN!

fluorescent lover 40
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Aug 17, 2018 at 02:07 PM Author: fluorescent lover 40
Have 2 Bonuslines. One if from May 1968, the other is from July 1971. NOS and used.

Current: US 120v 60hz
Power provider: Southern California Edison (SCE)

-Date decoder of some US lamps 1960-present.
-I'll save any vintage lamp... dead or alive! Smiley

Fluorescent05
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Zack


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Jul 03, 2019 at 08:13 PM Author: Fluorescent05
How old are these lamps?

Don't be fooLED, T8 IS the worst thing to do to a magnetic T12 fixture.

fluorescent lover 40
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Jul 03, 2019 at 08:22 PM Author: fluorescent lover 40
1970's vintage.

Current: US 120v 60hz
Power provider: Southern California Edison (SCE)

-Date decoder of some US lamps 1960-present.
-I'll save any vintage lamp... dead or alive! Smiley

Fluorescent05
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Jul 03, 2019 at 09:25 PM Author: Fluorescent05

Ehh... I'd keep an eye on the blackened one just in case though. Unless that lamp end experienced moments with no
electrode filament heating during start up, that end does kinda look like it's reaching true EOL.
Almost looks as if the discharge is on the remaining 'good' portion of the electrode filament. If I'm right, that
lamps is actually very close to EOL.
But then again, a camera's capture can definitely be deceiving. Especially with the 120 hertz flicker in the way.
Any pinkish color/blue flashing?

No flashing at all, even now, almost 11 months later.

Don't be fooLED, T8 IS the worst thing to do to a magnetic T12 fixture.

suzukir122
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Jul 03, 2019 at 10:12 PM Author: suzukir122
@Fluorescent05, oh ok lol so probably just bad pin contact or something with the previous owner that had
this lamp before you. Looks as if it had no electrode filament heating on a Rapid Start circuit for a while.

Interests
1. Motorcycles, Women, and Lighting (especially fluorescent)
2. Weighting/staying extremely athletic
3. Severe Thunderstorms of all kinds
4. Food and drinks. So gimme them bbq ribs
Yep
Lighting has been a passion of mine since I was born. I consider everyone on LG to be a friend

jercar954
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Jul 03, 2019 at 10:37 PM Author: jercar954
The blackened one might have been seated in the holders correctly. That can cause blackening like this. Always make sure the alignment nibs align with the slot where the pins are inserted.

Preheat and T-12 fluorescents forever! Down with LED's and instant start T-8 fluorescents.

suzukir122
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Jul 03, 2019 at 10:46 PM Author: suzukir122
@Jercar954, yep that's what I was thinking, but I'm convinced maybe it was the fault of the previous owner leaving it in that
condition, leaving no filament heating to that blackened end, for a long period of time. There's also the chance that maybe
that filament is broken but I doubt it... also could've been bad wiring connection as well

Interests
1. Motorcycles, Women, and Lighting (especially fluorescent)
2. Weighting/staying extremely athletic
3. Severe Thunderstorms of all kinds
4. Food and drinks. So gimme them bbq ribs
Yep
Lighting has been a passion of mine since I was born. I consider everyone on LG to be a friend

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