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What Happens When You Connect a 6.3 Volt Lamp to 120 Volt Mains!

What Happens When You Connect a 6.3 Volt Lamp to 120 Volt Mains!

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I was helping our maintenance department fix a boiler at work the other day. I noticed that the indicator lamps were burned out so they handed me this lamp. I put it in the socket and it was sure bright for about 1/30th of a second! Made a nice POP sound too. The indicator lamps operate at 120 volts, but this is a 6.3 volt lamp. At first, I thought the glass was crackled, but I think the appearance is just from filament and stem parts evaporating and being splattered on the inside of the glass.

Econo-Lite.JPG GandG_Products.JPG Overvoltage.JPG GTE_Sylvanias~4.JPG

Light Information

Light Information

Model Reference:755
Lamp
Lamp Type:Indicator

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Filename:Overvoltage.JPG
Album name:nogden / Incandescent - Other
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:567 KB
Date added:Jan 15, 2013
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Date Time:2013:01:15 20:27:09
DateTime Original:2013:01:15 21:25:25
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paintballer22
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120V/240V 60hz


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Jan 15, 2013 at 08:30 PM Author: paintballer22
I am suprised the glass did not explode.
Danny
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Jan 16, 2013 at 03:27 AM Author: Danny
Whoah that has gone out with a bang!!!
rjluna2
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Robert


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Jan 16, 2013 at 06:08 AM Author: rjluna2
Whoa I bet you had a big surprise

What were these maintenance people are thinking about when they replace these bulbs like this

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

nogden
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Nelson Ogden


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Jan 16, 2013 at 08:49 AM Author: nogden
I wasn't too surprised, I kind of thought these were line voltage indicators and I kind of thought the lamp they gave me wasn't 120 volt! I should have taken my suspicion seriously and metered the voltage at the socket. Oh well, it wasn't really a problem!
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Jan 16, 2013 at 09:01 AM Author: Powell
This is also what happens when there is a failure in a rectifier tube of an AC / DC american 5 tube radio ( 35W4 or 35Z5-GT) and the tap for the #47 lamp shorts and there is 120 volts on the lamp. That bulb looks like a #47.

NNNN!

nogden
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Nelson Ogden


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Jan 16, 2013 at 09:09 AM Author: nogden
Interesting! I have a radio with the "All American 5" tube compliment, though it hasn't shorted out like that yet!
Powell
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Jan 16, 2013 at 10:01 AM Author: Powell
You get a bright flash. The radio will still work. It's no problem if there is no lamp. Now if there is a BAD short in the rectifier......

NNNN!

socketgeek63
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TheDennisManNetwork photoelectric4863
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Apr 20, 2014 at 09:25 PM Author: socketgeek63
Yikes! Usually these 120 volt indicators are likely to take the NE-51 bayonet bulb with the same envelope as that burned 6.3 volt bulb.

Long live the great old 20th century quality in electrical & lighting products!

nogden
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Nelson Ogden


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Apr 21, 2014 at 06:38 AM Author: nogden
Yes, usually that is the lamp of choice in these indicators. However, the circuit does not have the necessary ballast resistor to drive a neon lamp. There are NE-51 style lamps with integral resistors, but they are hard to find. Install a standard neon lamp and *POW*! (Don't ask me how I know! )
socketgeek63
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TheDennisManNetwork photoelectric4863
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Apr 21, 2014 at 09:16 AM Author: socketgeek63
Never knew there was NE51's that had built in internal resistors, but I have a couple of old Dialco indicator lamp assemblies that appear to have built in resistors that are specifically made for using NE51 only, no other bayonet incadescent bulb will light inside these http://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?album=3072&pos=0&pid=88321 when connected to an low voltage power supply.

Long live the great old 20th century quality in electrical & lighting products!

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