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Beryllium Afterglow?

Beryllium Afterglow?

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This is my modern Philips Natural Light tube. The afterglow makes it look like a Beryllium based tube, but that is no longer used, if I remember correctly.
What could be going on?
Red afterglows don't seem normal for a modern tube.

DSCF1020.JPG DSCF1019.JPG DSCF1012.JPG IMGP6647.JPG

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Manufacturer:Philips

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Filename:DSCF1012.JPG
Album name:wattMaster / Our Lighting Experiments
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:97 KB
Date added:Jul 25, 2016
Dimensions:2465 x 1643 pixels
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RCM442
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Jul 25, 2016 at 03:09 PM Author: RCM442
Beryllium has been banned from fluorescents for MANY MANY decades so it's safe to say that ANY modern tube you buy will NOT have it! The phosphor blends I'm not sure of at all.
Also, try this lamp under a blb, it glows green!

Linear fluorescent will never lose to LED!
I am not Anti-LED, as I have some in use at my house.
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wattMaster
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Jul 25, 2016 at 03:12 PM Author: wattMaster
Let's look at the possible candidates:
Beryllium: Banned.
Halophosphor: Too low CRI.
Deluxe Halophosphor: Green afterglow.
Triphosphor: Green/Yellow afterglow.
Multiphosphor: Too efficient.
I checked the spectrum, and it's...Deluxe Halophosphor?

SLS! <click

RCM442
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Jul 25, 2016 at 03:26 PM Author: RCM442
It COULD be multiphosphor, I know they are rare earth phosphors, but I really don't know what they are. The only way to find out is to ask Philips, and they may not even tell you!

Linear fluorescent will never lose to LED!
I am not Anti-LED, as I have some in use at my house.
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wattMaster
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Jul 25, 2016 at 03:28 PM Author: wattMaster
But don't Multiphosphors have lots of spikes in the spectrum?

SLS! <click

RCM442
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Jul 25, 2016 at 03:30 PM Author: RCM442
Mostly all fluorescents have spikes in the spectrum, I have the exact same lamp here. I tried using a CD to see the spectrum, but that really never works. Couldn't see much of anything, just a rainbow lol

Linear fluorescent will never lose to LED!
I am not Anti-LED, as I have some in use at my house.
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Jul 25, 2016 at 03:31 PM Author: wattMaster
I made a spectroscope, like the ones you see on this site, the spectrum looks like typical Deluxe Halophosphor.
If it was regular Halophosphor, it would have a dismal CRI.

SLS! <click

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