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Svetotekhnika SPO DRL 125(6) 125W MV Lamp

Svetotekhnika SPO DRL 125(6) 125W MV Lamp

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Svetotekhnika SPO DRL 125(6) 125W MV Lamp

I finally managed to get hold of a Russian mercury lamp.
The lamp emits a nice colour when fully run up and appears to be in the region of 3500k to my eyes.
I understand that the 6 in brackets refers to the percentage of red light emitted.

I'd be grateful if anyone could tell me what phosphor chemistry this lamp uses and what the percentage of red light would be emitted from a modern mercury lamp with Eu:YVO4 phosphor. Thanks.

IMG_9041.JPG IMG_9134.JPG IMG_9133.JPG IMG_9048.JPG

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Svetotekhnika SPO
Lamp
Lamp Type:HPMV
Base:E27
Electrical
Wattage:125
Physical/Production
Factory Location:USSR

File information

File information

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Album name:Andy / Mercury Lamps
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:200 KB
Date added:Dec 07, 2018
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Date Time:2018:12:07 13:50:06
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Max.
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Dec 31, 2018 at 08:14 AM Author: Max.
The phosphor used in these DRL is a simple europium-activated yttrium vanadate material. The percentage of red light emitted by standard fluorescent HPMV lamps coated with this phosphor (and the yttrium vanadate phosphate borate variant) depends on the model and manufacturer. In general, the figure varies between 10 and 15 %, with larger lamps having usually a lower percentage of red light. So, the 6 % of the present lamp is quite a sub-standard level. Now, the performances of soviet-made fluorescent materials are known to degrade very quickly over time, so the 6 % red ratio certainly refers to a value at 100 h (or later); that would explain why the light color from the new lamp appears to be nice to your eyes.
Gospodin horoshiy
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Jan 02, 2019 at 12:10 PM Author: Gospodin horoshiy
You are a little wrong. ) This "sub-standard" level of red, as you wrote it, is possibly applicable to ratio to imported lamps. Domestic industry (domestic for me) was produced lamps with various red ratio for conditional power to expand the range. Of course, it also depended on the production date. I emphasize this. For example, for the mid of 90's the red ratio (6) was no longer produced. But (8 ) was the most common for lamps with a capacity of 125, 250, 400, 700 and 1000 watts.
Thus, (in the face of this factory) the red ratio (6) for this lamp is not an exception to the rule, but is the most common percentage for the end of 80's. Despite their age, even today can easily find and buy a variety of such lamps with a red coefficient of (6) from old stocks.
As for other manufacturers (in USSR there were only a four factoryes, which produced gas-discharge lamps for general lighting), either their phosphor was of very poor quality even in new lamps and their more high red ratio did not correspond to it's level, remaining at level (6) (and in some years at level of simple chalk or chicken manure), or they traditionally was produced a phosphor of good quality, but only one level for all lamps in all time. Even for the powerful.
But You are also right. The specified characteristics for each lamp were given for 100 running hours.
Max.
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Jan 02, 2019 at 01:02 PM Author: Max.
Thank you for your comment Gospodin horoshiy. When I wrote that a 6 % red ratio is sub standard, I was naturally referring to the standards of Western countries from where the lamp technology originates and where the red ratio of standard Eu:YVO4- and Eu:Y(V,P,B)O4-coated mercury lamps is never below 10 % at 100 h. A red ratio of 8 % and below is traditionally associated with an older mercury lamp type coated with magnesium fluorogermanate (or magnesium arsenate), and in this case the degree color correction is indeed sub-nominal (even considered as poor). Now, if the quality of the Eu:YVO4 phosphor produced in the USSR was so poor that the red ratio was consistently below 10 %, then it is indeed a problem of sub-standard quality instead of the level of the standards in question.
Gospodin horoshiy
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Jan 02, 2019 at 01:26 PM Author: Gospodin horoshiy
I understand you, Max. ) Yes, so it. To me is difficult to say anything about low-pressure fluorescent mercury lamps and their phosphor. I have little interest in them. But according to my observations, the main cause of degradation was low resistance to temperature. At least in the old lamps. I will not consider the lamps produced by the same plant in difficult years 90's after the collapse of the USSR.
Also in my opinion there was another reason - by the turn of the 70s - 80s, this factory remained the main producer of high-pressure lamps of average power, in which was a great need at that time. And the factory put the main effort into the volume of products, as the need for lamps of average power of 250-400 watts was colossal for the USSR. Nevertheless, we managed to produce lamps in the export version. But i do not think that the quality of the phosphor there was at a higher level.
Max.
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Jan 02, 2019 at 01:31 PM Author: Max.
That's a very interesting account of the situation with HID lamps in the USSR during the 70s and 80s! I can imagine how significant the demand was for mercury lamps at the time, and I am surprised that МЭЛЗ did not (apparently) play a more important role in the supply of these lamps.
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Jan 02, 2019 at 02:48 PM Author: Gospodin horoshiy
Yes, you is right. Until today, it was not possible to find evidence that MELZ produced lamps of 250-400 watts from the 70's to the beginning of the 90's. Especially 125 watts. There is only one lamp for my comrade, model DRL400, which is dated to the mid-60's. Naturally, it's mark does not indicate the red ratio. It was a very old phosphor. The red ratio on russian lamps was not written until the end of the 70's, as for example on this lamp https://street-lighting.webnode.ru/lampy/selz/drl4002/
But from that point in time until the beginning of the 90's there is no other lamp, either real or in the photo, which could confirm this. Also, according to some information, there is according to which MELZ transferred it's developments to a new plant in Saransk in the late 60s.
Thus, it turns out that MELZ concentrated it's potential among high-pressure lamps only on the production of high-power lamps for industrial needs from 700 watts to 1000. 2000 watts ceased to be produced very long ago and today they are very rare.
Only by the beginning of the 90's, when the first hints of competition began to appear, the first low-power lamps 250 and 400 watt from MELZ began to appear. You can see them from me from the beginning of the release until the complete collapse of this plant https://street-lighting.webnode.ru/lampy/melz/
But it should be noted that, in general, low-power lamps from 90's were also with good quality phosphor, traditionally inherent in MELS, no less than (10) and their burners were of their own production. At least in the lamps to late 90's. But the lamp power of 125 watts MELZ never did.
Andy
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Jan 07, 2019 at 02:55 AM Author: Andy
Thanks for your information Max and Gospodin!

My main area of interest is vintage fluorescent and mercury lamps. Always interested in doing lamp trades - just let me know! Smiley

Max.
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Jan 07, 2019 at 11:02 AM Author: Max.
You're welcome Andy! And thanks Gospodin horoshiy for the interesting details.
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