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Sylvania Halogen 72W A19 Soft White Lamps

Sylvania Halogen 72W A19 Soft White Lamps

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Here is a pack of Sylvania halogen 72 Watt A19 extra soft white lamps I bought at Family Dollar. These seem like very nice lamps. They are technically "modified spectrum" but the light they produce is indistinguishable from normal incandescent. When off, the lamps have a very slight pink tinge; just enough to count as modified spectrum. In use, however, they look fine.

Even though they are only rated at 1,200 lumen, they seem brighter. When compared side-by-side with a traditional 75-watt and 100-watt lamp, they look closer to a 100-watt lamp. They aren't quite as bright as a 100-watt (1,710 lumen) lamp, but are close. They seem noticeably brighter than the 1,210 lumen 75-watt lamp I compared them with.

I'm very happy to see American-made incandescent lamps (yes, halogen is incandescent!) available locally.

Syl Halogen 72W.JPG Westy 100 Etch.JPG chem stand light.JPG Miniature Lamp Merchandiser.JPG

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Sylvania (Ledvance)
Lamp
Lamp Type:Halogen
Base:Medium Screw
Shape/Finish:A19 Soft White
Service Life:0.9 years (probably 1,000 hours)
Electrical
Wattage:72 Watt
Voltage:120 Volt
Current:0.6 Amp
Optical
Lumen Output:1,200
Lumen Efficacy:16.67 LPW
Color Temperature:2,800 K
Physical/Production
Dimensions:Typical for full-size A19
Factory Location:USA

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LampLover
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GoL PeterYachymczyk UCYBAif_ag4v8nIcCU3VAmag
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Jul 21, 2019 at 07:34 AM Author: LampLover
What exactly does "modified spectrum" mean?

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CEB1993
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Camden


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Jul 21, 2019 at 08:24 AM Author: CEB1993

What exactly does "modified spectrum" mean?


Modified spectrum is a slight “soft pink” coating on halogen A19 lamps to help them produce warmer, more incandescent-like light. It works to produce warmer light, although it slightly reduces efficacy and lumen output.

Philips DuraMax and GE Miser forever!  Classic incandescents are the best incandescents!

nogden
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Nelson Ogden


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Jul 21, 2019 at 08:26 PM Author: nogden
It also allows the lamp to meet less stringent standards in the lighting legislation. Originally, modified spectrum lamps were "full spectrum" incandescent lamps like GE Reveal, etc.
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GoL PeterYachymczyk UCYBAif_ag4v8nIcCU3VAmag
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Jul 22, 2019 at 04:13 PM Author: LampLover
Thank You for the information Camden (CEB1993) and Nelson (nogden)

How does it reduce efficacy though(LPW)? I never get the logic behind those lamp bans and efficacy standards. As in most cases CRI does not matter for example security lighting (HPS & LPS for example).

By the way my name is Peter. I really like this site as most members here are on a first name basis and not hidden behind a screen name.

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nogden
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Jul 23, 2019 at 12:16 PM Author: nogden
This is a good question, Peter. Definitely a concept that's valuable to understand. Putting lamp bans aside for a moment, let's consider traditional incandescent lamps. The spectrum of regular lamps is quite yellow-heavy and blue deficient. To compensate for that, "full spectrum" lamps are/were available. They are just regular lamps with some kind of blue filtering. The blue filtering doesn't increase the blue output, it merely decreases the yellow component of the spectrum. Since the blue filtering only serves to reduce part of the light output (by reducing the warmer end [yellows] of the spectrum), the total output from the lamp is decreased compared to an unfiltered lamp. Less light for the same power input (same wattage).

As an example, a 100-watt Sylvania soft white lamp (no longer available) has a light output of 1690 lumens. A comparable 100-watt Sylvania daylight lamp would have had a light output of only 1270 lumens. Same wattage in -- less light out.

Now consider the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA07). EISA07 requires that a lamp with rated lumens betwen 1490 and 2600 may use no more than 72 watts and must last at least 1,000 hours. However, modified spectrum lamps can meet a less-stringent standard: a 72-watt lamp only has to produce between 1118 and 1950 lumens. Another way to put it is regular 72-watt lamps must produce at least 1490 lumens whereas modified spectrum 72-watt lamps must produce at least 1118 lumens. Instead of making halogen lamps produce at least 1490 lumens, it is easier to only produce at least 1118 lumens and make just enough change to the lamp coating to qualify as "modified spectrum" in the legislation.

In sum, EISA07 recognizes that modified spectrum lamps (such as Sylvania's daylight lamp in my example) have inherently lower efficacy (lumens per watt). Therefore, the legislation holds those lamps to a less stringent standard.

The definition of "modified spectrum" in the legislation doesn't say the lamp has to be blue; it only says it has to be at least "4 MacAdam steps distant from the color point of a clear lamp with the same filament and bulb shape" and not be a colored lamp. These lamps are just pink enough to qualify, apparently. It is easier to go pink than to go blue because there's more energy in the warmer end of the spectrum, even for halogen lamps. This probably isn't what the legislators had in mind when they crafted the legislation, but that's the way it goes!

Clear as mud? Let me know if anything I said doesn't make sense! I realize its rather technical.
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GoL PeterYachymczyk UCYBAif_ag4v8nIcCU3VAmag
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Jul 23, 2019 at 01:17 PM Author: LampLover
[quote author=nogden link=#msg515609 date=Jul 23, 2019 at 12:16 PM]
This is a good question, Peter. Definitely a concept that's valuable to understand. Putting lamp bans aside for a moment, let's consider traditional incandescent lamps. The spectrum of regular lamps is quite yellow-heavy and blue deficient. To compensate for that, "full spectrum" lamps are/were available. They are just regular lamps with some kind of blue filtering. The blue filtering doesn't increase the blue output, it merely decreases the yellow component of the spectrum. Since the blue filtering only serves to reduce part of the light output (by reducing the warmer end [yellows] of the spectrum), the total output from the lamp is decreased compared to an unfiltered lamp. Less light for the same power input (same wattage).

As an example, a 100-watt Sylvania soft white lamp (no longer available) has a light output of 1690 lumens. A comparable 100-watt Sylvania daylight lamp would have had a light output of only 1270 lumens. Same wattage in -- less light out.

Now consider the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA07). EISA07 requires that a lamp with rated lumens betwen 1490 and 2600 may use no more than 72 watts and must last at least 1,000 hours. However, modified spectrum lamps can meet a less-stringent standard: a 72-watt lamp only has to produce between 1118 and 1950 lumens. Another way to put it is regular 72-watt lamps must produce at least 1490 lumens whereas modified spectrum 72-watt lamps must produce at least 1118 lumens. Instead of making halogen lamps produce at least 1490 lumens, it is easier to only produce at least 1118 lumens and make just enough change to the lamp coating to qualify as "modified spectrum" in the legislation.

In sum, EISA07 recognizes that modified spectrum lamps (such as Sylvania's daylight lamp in my example) have inherently lower efficacy (lumens per watt). Therefore, the legislation holds those lamps to a less stringent standard.

The definition of "modified spectrum" in the legislation doesn't say the lamp has to be blue; it only says it has to be at least "4 MacAdam steps distant from the color point of a clear lamp with the same filament and bulb shape" and not be a colored lamp. These lamps are just pink enough to qualify, apparently. It is easier to go pink than to go blue because there's more energy in the warmer end of the spectrum, even for halogen lamps. This probably isn't what the legislators had in mind when they crafted the legislation, but that's the way it goes!

Clear as mud? Let me know if anything I said doesn't make sense! I realize its rather technical.[/quote]

Thanks Nelson.

I have seen blue incandescent lamps before and I have had a few GE Reveal lamps in the past and I liked them but LED killed them off.

I hate how LED is killing traditional lighting. It can't be good for the environment as we lighting collectors have seen them (LED) being EOL out of the package or the first night of use, I do get that they contain no mercury but what about the other chemicals in the LED dies? OK sorry for the rant I get PO'ed about perfectly good fixtures and street lights getting replaced all because of a few watts with lighted waffles

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Jul 23, 2019 at 04:50 PM Author: Skiller
Something else I just noticed about the Lumen output figures mentioned here: How come a soft white American 120V 100W incandescent lamp boasts 1690 Lm, while even a clear European 230V 100W lamp has only around 1350 Lm (regular household lamp, not shock proof)?
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Jul 23, 2019 at 05:37 PM Author: nogden
Skiller, great question! Incandescent lamps have inherently lower efficacy as design voltage goes up. For higher voltages, the filament has to be longer, and the heat generated by the filament is less concentrated.
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Jul 23, 2019 at 06:42 PM Author: Skiller
Dang! That must be it. Thanks for the explaination, nogden.
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