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The safest outlet in the World! ABB'Jussi' Socket outlets

The safest outlet in the World! ABB'Jussi' Socket outlets

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The safest outlet in the World!
 
ABB 'Jussi' Socket outlets.
Euro outlet and Schuko outlet.
Child protector is in the chassis and connections to four wires.
Patented System.

IMG_20200104_173557.jpg IMG_20200104_173456.jpg IMG_20200104_173228.jpg IMG_20200104_172054.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:ABB Oy, Wiring accessories (ABB Busch-Jaeger Oy)
Fixture
Socket Type:Schuko and Euro
Electrical
Voltage:230 (250V)
Current:16A, 2,5A
Physical/Production
Factory Location:Porvoo, Finland
Fabrication Date:2019

File information

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Album name:Ricu / Lighting accessories
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Date added:Jan 04, 2020
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Date Time:2020:01:04 17:32:28
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sox35
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Jan 04, 2020 at 11:47 AM Author: sox35
Hmm, not sure; no switches, no polarity enforcement. I see they have at last fitted shutters over the live connections, but I still prefer our 13A types.

Ria in Aberdeen
It'll be all right in the end, and if it isn't all right, it isn't the end Smiley

Roi_hartmann
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Jan 04, 2020 at 12:42 PM Author: Roi_hartmann
What for would you need polarity enforcement? Shouldn't appliances be designed in a way that polarity doesn't matter.

Aamulla aurinko, illalla AIRAM

sox35
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Jan 04, 2020 at 01:23 PM Author: sox35

What for would you need polarity enforcement? Shouldn't appliances be designed in a way that polarity doesn't matter.

They should indeed, but they aren't. Switches are routinely put only in the live leg, not both. Wiring up discharge lamps to ballasts is also important, the terminals are marked live and neutral, it does matter in many cases.

Ria in Aberdeen
It'll be all right in the end, and if it isn't all right, it isn't the end Smiley

migette1
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Jan 04, 2020 at 01:33 PM Author: migette1
Our 13a system which is found in other countries is perhaps the safest as polarity is important and makes sure that the live or active wire is switched rather then find out when the equipment was thought to be off but it was disconnected on the neutral and the live was at the appliance. With Schuko they switch on both live and neutral as the plug can go in either way, not so the 13a and to add to extra safety theres a fuse inside the plug and we use a ring main system starting and finishing at the consumer box...only problem is that you could put a 13a fuse in say a table lamp instead of a much lower value of 2a. I would suggest that when a plug is sold it sold without fuse and the appropiate fuse is bought at the same time. Chinese hotels also use this as well as their own plugs like the Australian ones. I must show a selection of plugs I have over the years. Hope this helps.

Interested in the history of electric lighting and incandescent in particular and neon glow lamps.

Mr. Orthosilicate
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Jan 04, 2020 at 02:46 PM Author: Mr. Orthosilicate
I personally prefer the American circuitry in terms of overcurrent simply because several outlets are protected by a single 15a or 20a breaker, so you don’t have to rely on having the correct fuse. Also, the voltage at the socket is half that in Europe or the UK.

From every other perspective though, our system kind of sucks. The pins aren’t protected, outlets are always installed upside down (the ground prong should actually be on top, not the bottom, which is only really done in hospitals), and we have a mess of different plugs for different currents and voltages. Admittedly, a great deal of that comes from the fact that our plugs and infrastructure were being built as the technology developed, but it is still a problem that a socket once used for 120v connections, interchangeably with our standard plug, and often found in old duplex receptacles in a form designed to accept either plug, was later repurposed for 240v, 15a connections. The fact that those old duplex receptacles were also designed for 240v usage, back when the 2 prong plug was the only standard connector aside from the edison screw, poses another issue. At one time, the same plug was used for multiple voltages, AC & DC, and several frequencies. All of our early plugs lacked grounds, and it didn’t become a standard that 120v receptacles had to have a ground, no matter where they were installed until 1965. Shutters were only required recently, and grounding is still not mandatory if the voltage is over 150v, so ungrounded delta 3 phase systems, sometimes at 480v, are still perfectly legal. All the old stuff is grandfathered in here, and many people don’t even care about the ground. You will often see 3 prong plugs with the ground cut off so they fit in older receptacles, or the usage of ground adaptors, which are seldom connected to a ground via an external wire as they are supposed to be. Our electrical is a general mess, but at least it shows we can afford ridiculous amounts of copper wiring, considering an average home has 100a 240v split phase service, to give two 120v legs and an upgraded or large home can have 200a or more
Mr. Orthosilicate
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Jan 04, 2020 at 02:53 PM Author: Mr. Orthosilicate
Also, non polarized plugs are a big problem. If you’ve ever heard of the dilemma of the All American Five radio, you know the issue they can pose. The tube filaments are all connected in series, and the B- supply comes directly from the line at 120v. This wouldn’t be a problem, except for the fact that the ground connections were all made to the chassis. If the plug was backwards, the chassis would be live at 120v constantly. Even if they had a double pole power switch, which none did as far as I know, the chassis would still be live when the radio was on. Hence the need for polarized plugs.
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Jan 04, 2020 at 03:45 PM Author: Roi_hartmann

Also, non polarized plugs are a big problem. If you’ve ever heard of the dilemma of the All American Five radio, you know the issue they can pose. The tube filaments are all connected in series, and the B- supply comes directly from the line at 120v. This wouldn’t be a problem, except for the fact that the ground connections were all made to the chassis. If the plug was backwards, the chassis would be live at 120v constantly. Even if they had a double pole power switch, which none did as far as I know, the chassis would still be live when the radio was on. Hence the need for polarized plugs.


On todays life, that's really rare scenario since such design hasn't been used for a long time.


But I like simplicity which comes from using just one common type of plug so you don't have to play with multiple different incomparible types of plugs.

Aamulla aurinko, illalla AIRAM

sox35
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Jan 04, 2020 at 05:18 PM Author: sox35
Knowing the polarity of the feed coming into a device *is* important. I want to know which wire is live and which is neutral. As I've said, when wiring discharge ballasts it can make a difference. And again, single pole switches in the neutral line are *not* a good idea.

I agree about a single type of plug, we have had that here for many years. Now we have to convince the rest of the world that the 13A plug is best

Ria in Aberdeen
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Mit dem Osten Siegen!


Alex_lightning jurgenneandertal
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Jan 05, 2020 at 03:00 AM Author: Alex
In wich way does it make a difference?

Lamp and Valve collector

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Jan 05, 2020 at 05:54 AM Author: migette1
Mention made of old radios, these would of been the old AC DC models which the chassis could be live and the aerial which should be isolated with capacitor...unless that went short circuit....In the US 120v would be much safer and you would feel a little tingle unlike here when you could be killed. During the war we imported these radios made for The States that had added to them a resistance power cord to drop the working voltage to 120v, only problem was if you shortened the cord or replaced it with a normal cord...a fire could result...these sets are now collectable so take great care if using 130v Always keep the cord not wound or bunched up to prevent over heating...great fun! Also sorry to hog this but several plugs were offered on this 'new ring main' that had to be fused they accepted what we use now...before we had 2a 5a 10a 2 pin and 15a 3pin I remember well as a kid!

Interested in the history of electric lighting and incandescent in particular and neon glow lamps.

sox35
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Jan 05, 2020 at 09:09 AM Author: sox35

In wich way does it make a difference?

If an ignitor is supposed to go in the live feed from the ballast to the lamp, then putting the whole circuit about face would not only mean it's in the neutral feed but also that the connections to the lampholder were reversed so the shell of the lamp cap would be live.

Ria in Aberdeen
It'll be all right in the end, and if it isn't all right, it isn't the end Smiley

Mandolin Girl
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Jan 05, 2020 at 09:14 AM Author: Mandolin Girl

On todays life, that's really rare scenario since such design hasn't been used for a long time.

But not impossible, which is why it's essential to have a polarised plug IMHO.!

Hugs and STUFF Sammi xXx (also in Aberdeen)

There are two kinds of light  -  the glow that illuminates, and the glare that obscures.
James Thurber  -  US author, cartoonist, humourist, & satirist (1894 - 1961)

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