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And the second place award for thinnest phosphor coating goes to...

And the second place award for thinnest phosphor coating goes to...

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Soviet 1991 SLZ LB F36T8 NOS

Not as thin as Silverliner's GE tubes he found in his local store, they get the first place award for thinnest phosphor coating. This tube gets second place :P

IMG_20190428_191916.jpg IMG_20190427_142520.jpg IMG_20190425_000852.jpg Chiese Sylvania CW F36T8.jpg

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Album name:vytautas_lamps / fluorescent tubes T8/T12
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Date added:Apr 25, 2019
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Date Time:2019:04:25 00:08:52
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Jovan
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Apr 25, 2019 at 03:47 AM Author: Jovan
Why you want to throw away this tube ? Save this tube for future generations.This is rare piece of history.
vytautas_lamps
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My idol is Mylene Farmer, deal with it.


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Apr 25, 2019 at 04:13 AM Author: vytautas_lamps

Why you want to throw away this tube ? Save this tube for future generations.This is rare piece of history.

No, you miss-understood it. I will not throw this tube out. I will keep it, I really like soviet tubes

New lighting technologies is a pity fest everywhere you look. From LEDs that last only for two months, to a never-ending global starvation of t8 fluorescent tubes.
We shall reinforce ourselves with good old full mercury t12s and HIDs made to surpass one's life, and give them all the middle finger ;

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Apr 25, 2019 at 04:16 AM Author: Jovan

No, you miss-understood it. I will not throw this tube out. I will keep it, I really like soviet tubes

That's good.I got from friend Tesla 36w tube in working condition.I would post image today.
rjluna2
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Robert


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Apr 25, 2019 at 10:37 AM Author: rjluna2
Check out Thin Phosphor Coating on Alto Lamps

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

Silverliner
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Verd a ray classic.


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Apr 25, 2019 at 03:06 PM Author: Silverliner
Man, never seen phosphor so grainy, and stems so crudely made. Still a cool lamp! At least this would be brighter?

May all the great lighting technologies have their place in history.

Administrator of Lighting-Gallery.net. Need help? PM me.

vytautas_lamps
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My idol is Mylene Farmer, deal with it.


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Apr 25, 2019 at 11:43 PM Author: vytautas_lamps

Man, never seen phosphor so grainy, and stems so crudely made. Still a cool lamp! At least this would be brighter?

Not very bright. The phosphor for some reason in all sovoet t8s glow very dimly. I have yet to see a sovket t8 glow as bright as modern t8. And as for the grainyness.. Welcome to the world of soviet tubes the stems too were made with no quality control. Because the demand for lamps was such a massive one, they started making fixtures in RESR plant in Latvia faster, thank saransk and smolensk were cabable of producing tubes, and that inturn made the quality control in tubes go inexistant. I have in my collection many tubes, that do work, but they habe slanted mounths, crudely shaped filaments, bent cathode legs, uneven tube glass even! Basically, before the turn of 1972 tubes were made with very good quality materials. They had nice and straight uniform mounts and very smooth phosphor, equivalent to modern tube phosphor. But then as new built schools and office buildings started to be fitted with fluorescent fixtures most of the time, the RESR factory started making fixtures at extremely fast rate. They made about a 400 fixtures a day, the had huge machines to wind ballasts, and they had seperate stations to make starters, and stamp out bodies and reflectors, and had bakelite extruders to make sockets. Basically all in one factory. And then the demand for tubes became a huge oroblem, so the factories dropped the whole quality thing and just started making tubes at the bearest minimum of quality control. Basically, if the tube lights - it is oacket. And no matter if there is a big clear hole where phosphor wasn't sticking, or if the filament was nicket on to the side of the tube while it was inserted, and one leg hot horizontally bent, and the filament is now strdched for 2 inches almost inside the tube (i have such tube with bent filament) and that is the reason why phosphor is so grany. They stopped making it so fine to save time, energy and effort and instead just make more tubes. Sorry, went into a bit of a rant.

New lighting technologies is a pity fest everywhere you look. From LEDs that last only for two months, to a never-ending global starvation of t8 fluorescent tubes.
We shall reinforce ourselves with good old full mercury t12s and HIDs made to surpass one's life, and give them all the middle finger ;

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