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Osram-Sylvania two lamp T8 programmed rapid start ballast

Osram-Sylvania two lamp T8 programmed rapid start ballast

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Programmed rapid start ballast for two F17, F25, F32 and 48" energy saving T8 lamps. Series wired. QTP2x32T8/UNV PSN-TC

start_method.jpg dimming_ballast.jpg PRSSylv.jpg P1040067.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Osram-Sylvania Inc
Model Reference:QTP 2x32
Fixture
Ballast Type:programmed rapid start
Electrical
Voltage:120 to 277v
Physical/Production
Factory Location:CHINA
Fabrication Date:2007
Application/Use:commercial and industrial

File information

File information

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Filename:PRSSylv.jpg
Album name:Luminaire / Fluorescent ballasts
Keywords:Gear
File Size:93 KB
Date added:May 22, 2010
Dimensions:1024 x 505 pixels
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icefoglights
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May 22, 2010 at 05:58 PM Author: icefoglights
Programmed start T8 ballasts seem to be getting hard to find. Most I see are IS

01010010 01101111 01100010 01100101 01110010 01110100

Medved
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May 23, 2010 at 12:40 AM Author: Medved
@Luminaire: Why do you think it is series and not parallel wired? The connection diagram might correspond to both...

@icefoglights: IS are cheaper, simpler, more efficient and for applications with ten or more burning hours per start the starting method does not influence the practical lamp life anymore.
What matter are the lamp EOL and mains overvoltage protections. The fact, then it is ProgStart does not mean, they are there...

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TudorWhiz
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May 23, 2010 at 03:25 AM Author: TudorWhiz
He is right it is Series...I have one myself...if you unscrew one lamp the other will go off..

Programmed start are more expensive....and in my job they are ONLY used only in the back room since they are wired to motion detector and always turns off...they indeed to last longer. It is indeed reasonable thing if they are always turned off then programmed start to be used....although our bathroom light in the back had gotten a motion detector switch but fixtures are left with IS and they never last like 2-3 months LOL

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Medved
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May 23, 2010 at 03:54 AM Author: Medved
@Jace: This might be result of EOL protection: When you remove the lamp, conditions inside the ballast are similar to the lamp EOL, so the protection shut it OFF. Then after reinserting new lamp the "lamp replacement" (detect presence of the filament) detection reset the controller.
On electronic ballast the inverter is common, so if one lamp trigger the protection and shut the inverter down, so second lamp loose power as well, even if it's circuit is connected in parallel to the first one.
But anyway: In practice the exact connection does not matter. What is important, if lamps might operate independently or not. In "classic" magnetic ballasts this, indeed, correspond to parallel/series connection, but on HF electronic ones this relation is not there anymore (parallel lamp circuits might yield dependent operation, as well as series circuits independent one)

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dor123
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May 23, 2010 at 09:21 AM Author: dor123
Medved: So why in the chinese fixture with the one IS HF ballast for two F8T5 lamps in the bathroom on my mother home, if one lamp reaches EOL and go out, or removed from the fixutre, the other lamp continues to operate?

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

Medved
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May 23, 2010 at 10:34 AM Author: Medved
@dor123: It mean the ballast operate them independently. Well, this is mostly side effect of missing EOL protection (unless each lamp has really separate ballast)...

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Luminaire
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May 23, 2010 at 12:42 PM Author: Luminaire
It is mentioned in spec sheet, and the voltage is applied between blue/red.

The GE Ultrastart are parallel wired.

(parallel lamp circuits might yield dependent operation, as well as **series circuits independent one**)

Parallel independent/dependent, yes. Series independent is by definition, not possible.
Medved
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May 23, 2010 at 01:53 PM Author: Medved
@luminaire: Series independent: What about InstantStart, where the starting resonant capacitor is connected directly to the output, but to each lamp separately, so the filament is not part of the resonance circuit (so to each lamp end goes only one wire) - the current continues via such resonance start capacitor of the missing lamp, forming high voltage across the missing lamp and the corresponding current light up the other lamp (lighted lamp has lower impedance then the capacitor, so the current go mainly trough the arc). Actually it light brighter then normal in this way, but the ballast could overheat.
You might try it on cheap IS electronic ballast - short out lamp filaments (wire of same color) and in this way connect only one lamp. But this experiment might be destructive for the ballast - so take it into account when doing such experiments...

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J-Frog
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May 25, 2010 at 06:18 AM Author: J-Frog
Unscrew one lamp Jace??? Last I checked fluorescent lamps had pins, not screw bases

I prefer the GE Ultrastarts because they are parallel wired and do not seem to have EOL which is a good thing or a bad thing depending on how you look at it.

Jeremiah The Bullfrog

dor123
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May 25, 2010 at 07:01 AM Author: dor123
Quote from Medved: @dor123: It mean the ballast operate them independently. Well, this is mostly side effect of missing EOL protection (unless each lamp has really separate ballast)...

Medved: So how in the fixture in the bathroom of my mother home, when one fluorescent lamp reaches EOL, it immediately shut down? And i checked the electrodes of a bad F8T5 lamp from it with my green laser pointer and both filaments look complete to me and not destroyed because of an electrode fusing mechanism of the ballast.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

Luminaire
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May 25, 2010 at 12:04 PM Author: Luminaire
@Medved:
I have never seen a series wired multi-lamp ballast. The wiring is often the same on diagram, but not the current path.

On series wired ballast, the ballast connection to the common end(usually yellow) can be disconnected and continue to work, because the lamps are driven in series (usually between blue and red wires). Yellow wires are there to provide cathode heating, as well as provide capacitive coupling for starting.

The ballast doesn't have enough voltage to strike across both lamps, so the capacitor provides a short cut across one lamp to provide the first lamp with full OCV, then once one lamp is ionized, it allows the second lamp to receive near OCV for starting as well. once both lamps are ionized, they operate in series.

On parallel wired ballasts, lamps are operated between common to red, common to blue.
Medved
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May 25, 2010 at 01:09 PM Author: Medved
@Luminaire:
Wiring colors say nothing, as each manufacturer uses different color assignment and some no wires at all.
Series wired ballasts are common here (on 230V mains), as it ensure both lamps reliably ignite even if they are way different (e.g. different wear). And moreover it cost less components (only one single ballasting inductor) and less current in the power stage
The ballast i've seen the series connection working independently was originally "standard" series connected (with filaments utilized as EOL fuses), but after red-neck "improvement" by shorting each filament ends - then it operate single lamp even if the other one was removed (but the protection mechanism was eliminated by this way).
Original lamp circuity (feedback winding was omitted; copy into Notepad or another fixed-character width editor - it is in "ascii-art" style):


+400v
|
|/
-|
|\
| ------
+------^^^^^^---------- -------
| | | |
|/ ----- |
-| | | |
|\ | | |
| | | |
| | | |
--- | \ / | ---
| x | ---
| / \ | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
----- |
| | |
| -------
|
| -------
| | |
----- |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| \ / | ---
| x | ---
| / \ | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
----- |
| | |
| -------
---
---
|
|
---


And after modification:


+400v
|
|/
-|
|\
| ------
+------^^^^^^-----------+--------
| | |
| + |
| | | |
|/ ----- |
-| | | |
|\ | | |
| | | |
| | | |
--- | \ / | ---
| x | ---
| / \ | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
----- |
| | |
+ |
| |
+--------+
| |
+ |
| | |
----- |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| \ / | ---
| x | ---
| / \ | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
----- |
| | |
+ |
| |
+--------
|
---
---
|
|
---

No more selfballasted c***

Luminaire
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May 25, 2010 at 06:43 PM Author: Luminaire
I was not talking about series/parallel with respect to power line.



Top is series wired rapid start which one current source and three voltage sources(for cathode heat). This is the way traditional American F40T12 magnetic, as well as most programmed rapid start electronic ballasts are wired. On these, you can actually remove the voltage source on common end and the lamps will continue to operate. If EOL protection shuts it down, it can be bypassed by adding a resistor in place of lamps.

Bottom is parallel wiring with each lamp having its own current source. All instant start T8 ballasts that I know are wired like this. I think only GE does parallel program rapid start. They're semi-independent, so if one lamp fails, the remainder will continue to operate sans intentional shut-down by ballast circuitry.

Of course, you can have series/parallel combo, such as four lamp ballast with two strings of two series lamps.

I explained using color code to save on having to draw it out, but I did it now.
Medved
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May 25, 2010 at 10:11 PM Author: Medved
I described series lamp connection, the "picture" was not readable? (half year ago this "ascii-art" worked well here...)

No more selfballasted c***

Luminaire
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Jun 14, 2010 at 02:27 AM Author: Luminaire
@Medved: instant start is a North America thing. Terminologies are different between EU and NA, and the IS we have are not in use in Europe.

"You might try it on cheap IS electronic ballast - short out lamp filaments (wire of same color)"
T8 lamps are universal start, but when using them on IS, you're supposed to short each filament using shunted sockets or external jumpers.

"and in this way connect only one lamp. But this experiment might be destructive for the ballast - so take it into account when doing such experiments..."
I don't know what you're talking about, but many two lamp ballasts officially allow one or two lamp usage. If one lamp is removed (due to failure or intentionally) the ballast will continue to operate the other lamp.

The other lamp may operate at higher ouptut or remain the same depending on ballast design. GE UltraMax is specifically designed to maintain the same output regardless of number of lamps. The purpose is to reduce stress on remaining lamps when one or more lamps fail in multi-lamp installations.
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