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MB/U 400W

MB/U 400W

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400W MB/U GEC mercury lamp with clear arc tube.

son70.jpg mbi_u400G.jpg MB400.jpg CDM20w.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:GEC
Model Reference:MB/U
Lamp
Base:GES
Electrical
Wattage:400W

File information

File information

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Filename:MB400.jpg
Album name:tuopeek / High Pressure Lamps
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:67 KB
Date added:Apr 28, 2013
Dimensions:800 x 688 pixels
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Date Time:2013:04:28 13:10:59
DateTime Original:2013:04:27 23:48:43
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Comments
LegacyLighting
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Apr 28, 2013 at 06:46 AM Author: LegacyLighting
Beautiful specimen Tuopeek.

Thanks to Andrew Pullen, I have one that has a few hours on it, but they really are great lamps that's for sure. Always wondered why they are marked 240/250V when in fact they require a ballast in order to run and stay in one piece!
tuopeek
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tuopeek 111967450636623837217 tuopeek1 77334065@N05/
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Apr 28, 2013 at 07:03 AM Author: tuopeek
Thanks, these are nice lamps I have been on the look out for a 400W for a while. It seems to be a GEC thing print 200/250v on it. I wonder how many have been destroyed because of that!
Globe Collector
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Preserving the Brightest Ideas of Our Age


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May 01, 2013 at 08:16 PM Author: Globe Collector
Lots of older British discharge lamps had voltage markings like this. I think the intent was to say "designed to operate off 240-50v (50Hz) supplies in series with the appropriate choke".
I often wonder myself how many "ham-fisted" electricians blew the hell out of these lamps!
I can just see it...

You:- "You need to put a choke in series with that or you'll blow it to hell."
Electrician:- "Well mate, it says 240-50v on here. And I'm an electrician {Cowboy}"
You:- "But its obviously a discharge lamp, look at the arc tube and it has no filament"
Electrician:- "No mate, it'll run straight off the mains, it says so! I'm going to wang it in this socket here!"
You:-"NO DON'T, You could injure yourself and destroy a rare lamp to boot!"
Electrician:- Screw, Screw, BANG! FLASH! .....Darkness, rattly noise of split moly seals and bits of arc tube press...."Shut, what happened!?"
You:- "Told you so you moron! Didn't know as much as you thought you cowboy! Now go and get me another one! I think you need to go back to Technical College!"

I cannot count the number of times I have seen similar scenarios play out like this.

Date code "PB", February 1982. This is the later sort with the conform-fit cap. Note the thread all the may up to the rim and the blob of lead over the rim into a dimple in the glass as well as soldering the lead-in down.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

James
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May 06, 2013 at 03:38 PM Author: James
The Rolls-Royce of mercury lamps, these were stunningly built. Not just the heavy-duty frames, but also with outstanding arc tubes, made slowly by hand from an era before costs became more important than quality, after which production speeds had to be pushed up right to the limit of how fast you could run before the inevitable reductions in performance became too significant.

Until the 1960s GEC offered its mercury lamps in several different voltage ratings. Commonly they sold lamps tailored for 200/220V, 220/240V and 240/250V. Each had a different mercury dose weight and different lamp voltage, so as to give optimum life performance and efficacy in different parts of the county where mains voltaged were different. By the 1970s most of the UK had standardised at 240V and it was also desirable to reduce the number of different lamp types in production. Thereafter GEC seemed to standardise on a single 220-250V version for each type.
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May 06, 2013 at 08:14 PM Author: Globe Collector
Hey, James. I have an old Philips HP-T 400, the really long one that came out just after the MA/V. I did twelve hours a night form 1969 to 1993 in the old war memorial lantern in Bellerive village. It only stopped because the gear housing, on another pole, filled with water and birdstraw after a hole rusted in it.
The arc tube is a "black as midnight" along its whole length, so the luminous flux is probably less than half what it should be, but it still starts and runs like a new one!
It is interesting that when a technology is first developed, it rapidly attains high quality, then they seem become blaze about it, as if they can reproduce it an home in their backyards, and the quality "bombs out".
I notice that most of the Premier European H.I.D. plants seem to concentrate on the flagship products (like CDO-TT, Citywhite etc.) and "farm out" the aging technology to places like Ya-Ming in Shanghai.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

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