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Sunbeam Carbon Lamp

Sunbeam Carbon Lamp

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This lamp has arrived here ca. two weeks ago.

It is the biggest Carbon lamp in the collection so far.
I know less about it, but I dicovered it must be made ca.1900

Sunbeam Lamp.JPG Support of the fiament.JPG Detail Platinum leads.JPG Connectors.JPG

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Sunbeam
Lamp
Lamp Type:Incandescent
Filament/Radiator Type:Carbon
Base:Open, no cap
Shape/Finish:Tube
Fixture
Socket Type:Screws on porcelan mounting plate
Location:In my collection
Electrical
Wattage:Unknown
Voltage:Unknown
Physical/Production
Dimensions:Lamp: Wide ca.14.0 cm, Lenght ca 26.0 cm, totally including base ca.33.0 cm
Factory Location:England?
Fabrication Date:ca.1900

File information

File information

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Filename:Sunbeam Lamp.JPG
Album name:Lampje / Carbon Filament Lamps
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Keywords:Lamps
File Size:683 KB
Date added:Aug 24, 2019
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Date Time:2019:08:24 14:19:39
DateTime Original:2008:12:31 23:00:00
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rigo
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Aug 24, 2019 at 01:17 PM Author: rigo
Sehr gut. Diese Lampe wurde doch hier angeboten!?
Lampje
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Aug 24, 2019 at 01:42 PM Author: Lampje
I don't know.
I took it over from a friend who had it in his collection for many years.
He stopped collecting light bulbs and sold out most of them.

It was always a wish of me to have a lamp of this system including the socket.
I have a few small lamps but without the "sockets" so this is the first complete lamp in the collection.
It fills a gap in the collection.

Now I have an old gaslamp from that period, a Nernst fixture, the Liliput arc lamp and this big Carbon lamp.
All around 1900.
Four different ways of lighting.
rigo
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Aug 24, 2019 at 01:44 PM Author: rigo
Alles sehr schöne Lampen! Glückwunsch!!!! Leider bekommt man diese Lampen nur selten.
Lampje
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Aug 24, 2019 at 01:47 PM Author: Lampje
Danke!
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Aug 24, 2019 at 03:08 PM Author: James
Good to see that this nice lamp made it into safe hands! I also had the chance to inspect it recently, and believe it is much earlier - I would put it around 1890. I will have to do some further research about Sunbeam but am pretty sure they must have been shut down by the Ediswan patent litigation in England around 1892-94.
Lampje
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Aug 24, 2019 at 03:19 PM Author: Lampje
Thanks James.
I have another Sunbeam lamp, but a very small one.
Loaded up some years ago on the L.G.
That lamp has two platinum eyes, one on each end and an exhaust. It measures ca. 7.5cm lenght, wide 3.5cm
It is in this same gallery.
Sunbeam is that a brand from the UK?
vintagefluorescent
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Aug 25, 2019 at 07:35 AM Author: vintagefluorescent

Good to see that this nice lamp made it into safe hands! I also had the chance to inspect it recently, and believe it is much earlier - I would put it around 1890. I will have to do some further research about Sunbeam but am pretty sure they must have been shut down by the Ediswan patent litigation in England around 1892-94.



I Agree with James,

This beautiful Light Bulb appears to be from the early to mid 1890s,

Wow, Very nice 👍
rjluna2
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Aug 25, 2019 at 05:19 PM Author: rjluna2
Very nice, Wieger

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

Globe Collector
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Aug 29, 2019 at 07:55 PM Author: Globe Collector
I agree too, I have a book with a wood block print a very similar lamp in it, and it is dated 1902. All the lamps depicted in the book are Ediswan from Ponders End...so as James says...this probably pre-dates them.

This is an extremely rare lamp Wieger...not in the league of the osmium filament, but just one step down from that. I'd say, you have one of the more interesting collections in Western Europe.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

Lampje
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Dec 10, 2019 at 03:52 PM Author: Lampje
It fill up a gap in my lamp history.
I did not have a lamp plus socket of this open system.
Only a few small carbon lamps with Platinum eyes.
I am curious about its power consumption and working voltage.
Globe Collector
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Dec 10, 2019 at 04:41 PM Author: Globe Collector
Here's how to get a "guesstimate" of it's working power.

Use your multimeter on the resistance range to measure the cold resistance of the filament.

Take the figure it gives you and divide it by two.

Now estimate the voltage....it has a single "hairpin" loop, so I'd make an educated guess it would be 100v, (but it could be as low as 50v).

Use Ohm's Law and the Power Equation to get the power figure by "plugging in" the voltage and the filament resistance divided by two.

P = V.I, COS Phi (Power Equation) [COS Phi = 1 in this case]

V = I.R (Ohm's Law)

Instinct sort of tells me this would be in the 250-350w range.


Most carbon lamps, the filament resistance halves as they come up to full power.

If you take a much more common and less valuable carbon lamp from your collection and place it on a Variac, then you can plot the applied voltage against the drawn current as you increase the voltage right up to the lamp's full rating...this will give you a plot of V vs I and you will be able to see how linear (or not) it is. (And see how the current increases at twice the rate as the voltage.)

You can then take this lamp and apply a voltage to it....BUT!! only up to about 10v...and get just the very first part of this lamp's V vs I plot....NOW, using the shape of the other lamp's V vs I plot, make the assumption that the full V vs I plot of this lamp will have the overall approximate same shape and linearity, so use that to extrapolate the plot of this lamp out to the point where the current and voltage give the value of HALF the cold filament resistance you measured with the multimeter...by this method you will get a good "guesstimate/ Guess-Estimate" of it voltage rating off the V axis of the plot.

Hope that answers your query and I hope you get to fill in the P, V and I fields of the datasheet above sometime soon!

I "discovered" a G.E.M. lamp in my collection by doing this....I did not previously realize I had a G.E.M. (General Electric Metallized) i.e. a Graphite filament rather than amorphous carbon like most carbon lamps are.

All the carbons I tested, their filament resistance halved, but the G.E.M. did indeed behave more like a metal and its filament resistance barely changed between cold and hot...and it was only then I took a closer look at the filament to see it was grey, not black!

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

Lampje
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Dec 10, 2019 at 06:07 PM Author: Lampje
@Globe Collector,
Thanks for this explanation.

I have no Variac, but I can start to measure the resistance.
Most of the lamps in the collection I never tried.
Always afraid something goes wrong.
I tried one lamp in the past and put it on a wrong voltage, so it went to e.o.l. in a very short time.
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Dec 10, 2019 at 06:13 PM Author: Lampje
Question,

How long have they (GEM lamps) been made?
I have one my self, and sometimes they are on Ebay.
I know less about these lamps.
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Dec 10, 2019 at 09:39 PM Author: Globe Collector
The G.E.M. lamp has a very interesting story. Their discovery was actually a mistake.

Willis Rodney Whitney accidentally placed a bunch of previously pyrolyzed cellulose filaments...(cellulose filaments were placed in a box of soot and heated to 1000*C to pyrolyze them back to ampophous carbon) back into the furnace and they received a second heating...this altered them into graphite and it was rapidly worked out that the thermoelectric properties were different, but more importantly the emissive properties gave another half a lumen per watt ...from 3.5 to 4.0.

This was in 1906 when G.E. was embarking on making sintered tungsten filaments and had just sent patent scouts to Budapest to purchase the rights to use Sandor Just and Fredric Hannamann's sintered metal filament. William Cooldige was set to work on the metallurgy of tungsten and this ate up much of the company's profits and was just about to send them broke....when the G.E.M. lamp was accidentally discovered, that extra 0.5 lumens per watt gave G.E. just enough of an edge over its competitors to continue funding the tungsten metallurgy research and survive. I think the tungsten metallurgy research cost G.E. 60 million dollars..AT THAT TIME, when 60 Million Dollars was a HUGE amount. (That's NOT corrected for devaluation of the currency over the last 113 years!)

So the accidental discovery of the G.E.M. lamp allowed G.E. to survive and become the GIANT it is today!

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

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Dec 11, 2019 at 05:12 PM Author: rom1
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Rare-Large-Sunbeam-Incandescent-Light-Bulb-C1889-Carbon-Filament/143469074787?hash=item21676c5963:g:II4AAOSwu~ld29Yb

Never sell the bear's skin before one has killed the beast

Lampje
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Dec 15, 2019 at 05:49 PM Author: Lampje
The one in the Ebay advertising misses the original "socket"
They ask a lot of money for this lamp.
There is also a Dutch museum that has a complete lamp and lots of other unique lamps.
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