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Miniature Hot Cathode Fluorescent

Miniature Hot Cathode Fluorescent


I don't remember where I found this picture back in 2005; there was some electronics or company that sold LEDs that offered this lamp. It was advertised as a HOT cathode fluorescent, and as you can see, it is tiny. I don't know the brand or ratings nor why anyone would want to use such a lamp, but I saved the photo as I thought it was interesting.

Maxlite_PAR20+.JPG 4000L_20A_Series_inc.jpg Tiny_Fluorescent.jpg Westy175wmerc+.JPG

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Filename:Tiny_Fluorescent.jpg
Album name:arcblue / Bulbs in captivity
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:42 KB
Date added:Apr 01, 2010
Dimensions:180 x 249 pixels
Displayed:508 times
Date Time:2005:06:09 10:02:17
DateTime Original:2005:06:09 10:02:17
Exposure Bias:0 EV
Exposure Time:1/1 sec
FNumber:f 27
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Focal length:100 mm
ISO:100
Make:Canon
Model:Canon EOS 10D
White Balance:1
URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-43363
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DaveMan
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Apr 01, 2010 at 08:01 PM Author: DaveMan
Pretty cool. I wonder what you would use to power it up. Also, I like how they revived the dome shape.

David L.
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dor123
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Apr 01, 2010 at 10:46 PM Author: dor123
I think this is a negative glow lamp. Hot cathode lamps are positive arc lamps so they should have a tube even single ended. I think this is a white or colored (But not red) Neon glow lamp with additional gas to produce UV to excite the phosphor.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

rjluna2
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Apr 02, 2010 at 04:16 AM Author: rjluna2
At one point some years ago, I was thinking and drew up a christmas miniature fluorescent light with a glass wall between inside the tube with exhaust on the top. This imaginary bulb has hot cathode in it. (4 wires coming out of the base of the bulb.)

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

vintagefluorescent
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Apr 02, 2010 at 05:21 AM Author: vintagefluorescent
That is cute !!!!!!!1
arcblue
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Apr 06, 2010 at 07:43 PM Author: arcblue
dor123, I thought it was a phosphored glow lamp too, but I remember the description (wherever it was) clearly said this was a hot cathode fluorescent lamp. It doesn't make sense to me, but maybe someone wanted the challenge of making such a lamp.

I'm lampin...

douro20
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Aug 25, 2012 at 07:55 AM Author: douro20
Yes, this is most definitely hot-cathode fluorescent. There are four wires coming out of the base and two very tiny filaments inside.
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Aug 25, 2012 at 10:49 AM Author: rlshieldjr
It may have been made and marketed prior to popularity and low price of white LEDs. Used primarily for low lightiting such as instument panels like aircraft or ships where long life is needed.
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Aug 25, 2012 at 02:59 PM Author: Ash
Hot cathode fluorescent can be run with 2 wires as well. For example US slimlines as well as all HID lamps. They start as cold cathode and continue as hot cathode

But the 4 wires are a giveaway

For white light without LED, they could have used argon glow + orange phosphors. There was probably a bigger reason why make this hot cathode lamp - perhaps specially for very low arc voltages

If it is meant to run on extra low voltage (with arc of maybe just few V), it is possible that the gear if resistor ballast + PTC Programmed Start - no high voltage and no coils
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Aug 26, 2012 at 04:34 AM Author: dor123
I think that this is a thermionic arc lamp, which have a V shaped filament with emissive coating + argon and mercury. When the lamp is on, the filament become incandesence and an arc is formed between the tips of the V.
This is the only form of hot cathode discharge that can be applied to a small low intensity single ended discharge vessel of that design.
For a positive arc column, it is necessary that the tube will be double ended.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.





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Aug 26, 2012 at 08:16 AM Author:
This would last longer than today's LEDs which usually die way before their rated life.
Ash
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Aug 26, 2012 at 08:34 AM Author: Ash
LEDs die if they are overpowered or overheated

Blue LEDs (which are the same as white LEDs) in power indicators on equipment exist more than 10 years allready. LED that been working 115 years continuously (not rare....) did 100K hours. There are many like that and still going strong

And thats as long as blue LEDs exist. Red LEDs exist allready since mid 80s as indicators in wide use. A red charging LED in emergency light fixture from the 80's did more than 200K hours by today and yet most those in use are still working



Hot cathode lamps can be single ended as well (like this), it only makes them less efficient. This does not prevent them from working

In a small appliance before white LEDs came out, it makes sense to make such inefficient hot cathode lamp - it lasts longer than incandescent and gives whiter light, and it does not need inverter




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Aug 26, 2012 at 08:38 AM Author:
I was referring to those white LEDs for general lighting. They rarely last past the 1000Hr mark before flashing or going dim.
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Aug 26, 2012 at 09:17 AM Author: Ash
Indeed. But this lamp here is probably closer to 1 LED than to those LED lamps in its light output
dor123
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Aug 26, 2012 at 07:54 PM Author: dor123
Neon negative glow lamps (Which are cold cathode) were more common for indicator lamps, before the LEDs were common here.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

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Jan 23, 2013 at 03:01 PM Author: eclipsislamps
I found the website in question! http://www.jkllamps.com/fluorescent/ccfllamps/BGF717-22

Keeping electrodes hot and gases ionzied.

douro20
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Jan 23, 2013 at 09:48 PM Author: douro20
JKL Components makes all kinds of special-purpose cold-cathode fluorescent lamps, as well as a rather unique selection of incandescent indicators.
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