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OSRAM HQS 250W

OSRAM HQS 250W

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Early 50th, mercury lamp

F_006_(0)_Philips_HP300.jpg F_006_(3).jpg F_013_Osram__HQS_250W.jpg F_014_Osram_HgH_5000_(1000W).jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Osram
Lamp
Base:E40
Electrical
Wattage:250
Physical/Production
Fabrication Date:ca 1950

File information

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Filename:F_013_Osram__HQS_250W.jpg
Album name:Trianero2012 / Mercury lamps
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:139 KB
Date added:Aug 21, 2012
Dimensions:1151 x 2050 pixels
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Globe Collector
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Aug 29, 2012 at 07:08 AM Author: Globe Collector
What can I say, the picture speaks for itself! A high pressure mercury lamp in a clear "K" bulb!!!!

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

Trianero2012
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Aug 29, 2012 at 07:12 AM Author: Trianero2012
This form was used also as frosted, but ALSO as mercury blended - I have two fantastic pieces 250 watt
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Aug 29, 2012 at 07:23 AM Author: Globe Collector
Two starting electrodes and resistors, they really wanted it to start. Is this because of the cold European winters when the vapor pressure of the mercury would be very low in the arc tube?

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

Ash
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Aug 29, 2012 at 10:07 AM Author: Ash
I think a reliability thing

Perhaps what you said - in extreme cold arc my be too hard to start - maybe to the point that it'll tend to glow at the starting electrode and not go to the main arc

A drop of mercury can condense on the bottom of the arc tube and if its vertical. it has small chance to exactly short out the starting electrode - making the lamp never work again untill taken out and flipped / shaked to break up the drop of mercury. This cannot happen in a lamp with 2 starting electrodes as at least one will allways work

There was a time when spot welds (used in the assembly) were not very reliable - on that account there were mercury lamps assembled entirely by springy / crimped contacts instead of the welding, as extra reliable lamp for places with high vibration. Extra starting resistor would help if one of them failed

Mercury lamps EOL by inability to start. With 2 electrodes i think the lamp would last a bit longer
Trianero2012
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Aug 30, 2012 at 02:20 AM Author: Trianero2012
The number of starting electrodes is not important, or a little only. Because I collect always very much years, I tested much-times different lamps - results was VERY undistinct. Japan factories (EYE, MELCO etc.) makes more types mercury lamps for Arctic service (resp. they MADE it, recently I donĀ“t have correct information). In formerly Sowietunion was this lamps usualy, because great part of country is very could weather. Was two principles. First - heating of arc tube by separate filament, then disrupted circuit with starting of arc. Second - similar as by blended nercury lamp for 120 volts - heating spiral internaly in arc tube, nearly main electrode, also disconnected past any time (oftly with help of bimetal stripe). Inland work Tesla made through history very much diffent types of mercury lamps, with one, or two resistors (helping elektrodes). With James we tested also idea use neon glow lamp instead resistor
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