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AIRAM Neodymlite mercury blended lamp

AIRAM Neodymlite mercury blended lamp

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Used for inner space, improved colour of light

J_019_-.jpg J_027_Osram_HWA_300.jpg J_028.JPG J_031_EYE_PAR_38_SB_RFF_160W.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Oy AIRAM
Lamp
Lamp Type:HgSNf
Base:E27
Electrical
Wattage:100
Voltage:220-230
Physical/Production
Factory Location:Finland

File information

File information

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Filename:J_028.JPG
Album name:Trianero2012 / Mercury lamps
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:200 KB
Date added:Oct 15, 2012
Dimensions:2050 x 1554 pixels
Displayed:235 times
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dor123
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Oct 15, 2012 at 03:57 AM Author: dor123
Improving the color light by using neodymium glass, may actually do the opposite and lower the CRI and the efficiency, as seen in neodymium Incandescent and halogen lamps (Often called "Full Spectrum light bulbs") which have an incomplete spectrum.
I think that the neodymium glass here, is to filter the yellow mercury lines, to cause the light to be a more pale blue/green.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.





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Oct 15, 2012 at 02:16 PM Author:
Early studies on the first mercury discharges (we're talking early 20th century here) have shown that these lamp's poor color rendering originates from too little blue and red radiation in the metal vapor's spectrum. For the red part the lack is obvious, but for the blue part, it appears that mercury's spectral emission up to 450nm is simply too weak compared to the strong green and yellow emissions. While the normal procedure against this situation consists in using blue and red fluorescent powders (a solution implemented in Westinghouse's Beautylite lamps), Ayram combined the use of a red phosphor with a neodymium glass so as to decrease mercury's green and yellow lines strengths in order to get a more balanced spectrum ... so I think there is indeed a rise in CRI but the color temperature will definitely be higher than with standard fluorescent HPMV lamps. Besides, neodymium ions in the glass material have an absorption band in the IR-A which limits the strength of mercury's lines aroun 1000 nm.
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Oct 15, 2012 at 02:24 PM Author: Medved
I would guess here the neodymium glass is used to suppress the yellow/green, while the ballasting filament to enhance the red part of the spectrum...

No more selfballasted c***





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Oct 15, 2012 at 02:36 PM Author:
Yes, this is what I initially thought, but depending on how effective is the filtering of Hg's green and yellow lines it might still be useful to have some extra red output from a phosphor in order to properly balance the spectrum (Stan, is there a fluorescent coating in this lamp?)
James
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Oct 27, 2012 at 08:31 AM Author: James
Until last year the Airam style neodymium-bulb mercury blended reflector lamps were still being made by Sylvania in Belgium. According to my memory of these, dor is correct and actually the CRI value is lower than the ordinary versions in clear bulb. Certainly the colour temperature is much higher. Now you have made me curious, I shall have a look next week to try and look up the spectral measurements of one of these and compare it vs the regular clear bulb versions.
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