Return to the thumbnail page Display/hide file information See previous file See next file

Neon glow lamp from 1970s

Neon glow lamp from 1970s

Click to view full size image

This came out of the control box of a Simpsons-Sears electric blanket Mom bought new in the 1970s. The blanket served her up until just a couple of months ago, when it suddenly stopped working. I determined it to be just a dirty power switch, but because the thermostat on the control box was also broken, and due to the nature of something like this and it being so old (and Mom says she would occasionally see something arc inside the blanket, although it never deterred her from using it O_o), I decided it was best to permanently retire it. I saved the wiring, and this lamp, and junked the rest. The blanket itself will continue to be used.

This is a nice lamp; the discharge is less yellow and more red that what is usual. It's quite a bit larger than the usual neon glow lamps you see nowadays, too. Notice how the resistor is built right into the lamp's own lead! It is 193k ohms. Arc voltage is 63 volts, current is 3.2 µA.

IMG_3151.JPG IMG_3143.JPG IMG_0794~0.JPG IMG_0678.JPG

Light Information

Light Information

Lamp
Lamp Type:Neon glow lamp
Service Life:Has done over 50000 hours so far
Fixture
Ballast Type:193k ohm resistor
Electrical
Wattage:0.0004
Voltage:Configured for 120V
Current:3.2 µA
Physical/Production
Factory Location:Canada, maybe?
Fabrication Date:1970s
Application/Use:Was used as power indicator for electric blanket

File information

File information

Download: Download this File
Filename:IMG_0794~0.JPG
Album name:themaritimegirl / Fluorescent lamps
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:914 KB
Date added:Mar 23, 2014
Dimensions:2480 x 2816 pixels
Displayed:258 times
Date Time:2014:03:23 16:05:31
DateTime Original:2014:03:22 22:35:50
Exposure Bias:0 EV
Exposure Time:1/25 sec
FNumber:f 3.4
Flash:No Flash
Focal length:5 mm
ISO:80
Make:Canon
Model:Canon PowerShot SX130 IS
Software:Microsoft Windows Photo Viewer 6.1.7600.16385
White Balance:1
URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-92085
Favorites:Add to Favorites
Comments
socketgeek63
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 12
View Gallery


TheDennisManNetwork photoelectric4863
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 23, 2014 at 02:04 PM Author: socketgeek63
The older neon glow lamps do seem bigger than what is made today! I used to walk around on carpet to pick up a static charge while holding these bulbs and touch one of the leads to an metal object where you normmally get shocked on, making the the bulb flash on for a split second! Great closeup pic!

Long live the great old 20th century quality in electrical & lighting products!

themaritimegirl
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 892
View Gallery

Florence


themaritimegirl themaritimegirl themaritimegirl
View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 23, 2014 at 03:45 PM Author: themaritimegirl
Thanks! And interesting story.

Electrical Engineering Graduate
YouTube | Twitter | Instagram

rjluna2
Sr. Member
****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 283
View Gallery

Robert


GoL
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 23, 2014 at 04:13 PM Author: rjluna2
With 193 KOhms resistor, it should last forever with the 120 Volts 60 Hz mains

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

migette1
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 18
View Gallery

Peter


user/migette1/videos
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 23, 2014 at 04:45 PM Author: migette1
So clear for its age. Just thinking what would of happened over here if it was still used whilst arcing, our voltage being twice as much. 120v I use to do my party trick when in Belgium and stuck my finger in the light socket much to the horror of the others who did not know it was 120v the result was just a tingle. Please do not do the same!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Interested in the history of electric lighting and incandescent in particular and neon glow lamps.

themaritimegirl
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 892
View Gallery

Florence


themaritimegirl themaritimegirl themaritimegirl
View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 23, 2014 at 04:49 PM Author: themaritimegirl
I occasionally accidentally shock myself when playing around with whatever hack-job lighting project I have going on the floor, and it makes every muscle in my arm convulse painfully. Not sure how other people can do it without much of a sensation at all!

Electrical Engineering Graduate
YouTube | Twitter | Instagram

rjluna2
Sr. Member
****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 283
View Gallery

Robert


GoL
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 23, 2014 at 05:11 PM Author: rjluna2
I had experience with 120 Volts 60 Hz main touch. I could literally feel the 60 Hz sensation during the shock

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

mrboojay
Full Member
***
Offline

Posts: 144
View Gallery

I love bulbs of all types.


mrboojay UC2tpasJaLc8IhVdjcDkI_3A mrboojay mrboojays_pics
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 26, 2014 at 09:12 AM Author: mrboojay
That is very cool! 50,000 hours? That is (supposedly) half the life of some LEDs! Though being an indicator light I can see that being the case. But that is still a long life.

About that shocking thing with your setups, you unplug them before messing with them right?

-mrboojay
My lighting-gallery.net Gallery
My YouTube Channel

themaritimegirl
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 892
View Gallery

Florence


themaritimegirl themaritimegirl themaritimegirl
View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 26, 2014 at 09:27 AM Author: themaritimegirl
Yeah, but I often do things that require manipulating a live circuit (eg. using a wire to manually preheat a fluorescent lamp), and sometimes my fingers slip. Funny, the shocks I've received from 120V are far worse than the ones I've ever received from electronic fluorescent lamp ballasts, which are much higher, including my Fulham Workhorse 2, which is a mighty 600V. I figure the high frequency must make it less potent, perhaps.

Electrical Engineering Graduate
YouTube | Twitter | Instagram

mrboojay
Full Member
***
Offline

Posts: 144
View Gallery

I love bulbs of all types.


mrboojay UC2tpasJaLc8IhVdjcDkI_3A mrboojay mrboojays_pics
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 26, 2014 at 09:56 AM Author: mrboojay
Ah, OK. That is a little weird.

-mrboojay
My lighting-gallery.net Gallery
My YouTube Channel

ace100w120v
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 670
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 28, 2014 at 03:05 PM Author: ace100w120v
As for making them glow, did you guys know a CRT televison will make a fluorescent lamp glow?
migette1
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 18
View Gallery

Peter


user/migette1/videos
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 28, 2014 at 03:15 PM Author: migette1
Be careful the old glass CRT hold a hefty charge from the EHT it acts as a capacitor and connection to the internal aqua dag is that thick lead from the EHT transformer.

Interested in the history of electric lighting and incandescent in particular and neon glow lamps.

themaritimegirl
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 892
View Gallery

Florence


themaritimegirl themaritimegirl themaritimegirl
View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 28, 2014 at 06:14 PM Author: themaritimegirl
I can make one glow by holding it up to my CB radio while transmitting.

Electrical Engineering Graduate
YouTube | Twitter | Instagram

ace100w120v
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 670
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 28, 2014 at 07:22 PM Author: ace100w120v
I'll have to try that one...
themaritimegirl
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 892
View Gallery

Florence


themaritimegirl themaritimegirl themaritimegirl
View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 28, 2014 at 07:43 PM Author: themaritimegirl
Whoops, I should've clarified: holding it up to the *antenna*. It's a handheld radio with a built-in antenna, so I considered the entire radio a single entity.

Electrical Engineering Graduate
YouTube | Twitter | Instagram

ace100w120v
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 670
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Mar 29, 2014 at 05:25 PM Author: ace100w120v
I figured on the antenna part already...
themaritimegirl
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 892
View Gallery

Florence


themaritimegirl themaritimegirl themaritimegirl
View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Feb 07, 2015 at 05:06 PM Author: themaritimegirl
Since the gallery software has been reconfigured such that pictures are no longer shrunk and compressed, I replaced this picture with the same one. Now it can be viewed at its full size and quality!

Electrical Engineering Graduate
YouTube | Twitter | Instagram

Danny
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 153
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Feb 07, 2015 at 05:33 PM Author: Danny
I like little lamps like this. I've got a bag full of these little neons. Always coming in use!

I thought my photos that I uploaded today looked bigger and better!
FrontSideBus
Jr. Member
**
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 59
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Feb 07, 2015 at 10:46 PM Author: FrontSideBus
It's just a shame that the ones I used to get hold of used to get wired direct to 240v mains

I must have quite high internal resistance because I can hold on to 110v without any problem. The tingling feels quite nice actually! Lol!

UK out of the EU!
http://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/index.php?cat=11271

© 2005-2019 Lighting-Gallery.net | Powered by: Coppermine Photo Gallery