Return to the thumbnail page Display/hide file information See previous file See next file

sylvania 1000w mercury from belgium with E shape

sylvania 1000w mercury from belgium with E shape

Click to view full size image

here's a lamp you never normally see in the USA. across the pond, the E shape went all the way to 2000w. here it is limited to the E37 size (typically 400w). the arc tube support sadly dislocated off the dimple in shipping but still appears to be functional. this lamp requires the less common H-34 ballast, as it is a low voltage, high current type. this lamp appears to be an E-52 size, smaller than our BT56s.

image~132.jpg image~116.jpg IMG_0263.JPG image~31.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:sylvania lighting international
Lamp
Lamp Type:mercury vapor
Base:E40
Shape/Finish:E-52
Service Life:24000 hours
Electrical
Wattage:1kw
Voltage:130v (full brightness)
Current:8A
Optical
Lumen Output:60000
Color Temperature:3900K
Color Rendering Index:45
Physical/Production
Dimensions:about 15 inches
Factory Location:tienen, belgium
Fabrication Date:2002

File information

File information

Download: Download this File
Filename:IMG_0263.JPG
Album name:silverliner / good ol' mercury vapor
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:241 KB
Date added:Apr 19, 2013
Dimensions:2050 x 1537 pixels
Displayed:295 times
URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-78633
Favorites:Add to Favorites
Comments
dor123
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2537
View Gallery
Other loves are computers, office equipment, A/Cs


View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 19, 2013 at 01:03 PM Author: dor123
This lamp intended to be operated on a simple choke ballast for european 1000W MV lamps. I don't think that it is compatible with the american equipment.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

Ash
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Posts: 3631
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 19, 2013 at 01:48 PM Author: Ash
Is USA 1kw mercury really different from Europe 1kw mercury ? I am not sure about that

If yes, mercury lamps dont mind slight underpowering, so if there is a US bllast that can run it at a bit below but close enough, it'll work fine
Silverliner
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 708
View Gallery

Verd a ray classic.


GoL
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 19, 2013 at 02:05 PM Author: Silverliner
all mercury lamps care for is the correct output voltage/current from the ballast. doesnt matter if it is a simple european choke (called a reactor here) or a CWA.

May all the great lighting technologies have their place in history.

Administrator of Lighting-Gallery.net. Need help? PM me.

Ash
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Posts: 3631
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 19, 2013 at 02:11 PM Author: Ash
The lamp dictates the voltage rather than accepting a given voltage. Then the current depends on he ballast and the lamp's voltage

If the arc voltage of the US 1kw and Eur 1kw lamps is same, then it can work on 1kw US mercury ballasts

If no, then it will not work right on a US 1kw ballast - ballast, lamp or both will be running outside of their specs. However, mercury lamps dont care much about light underpowering so if another US ballast exists that can power it at less but close enough to 1kw, and without being overloaded from this itself, it'll work well
Silverliner
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 708
View Gallery

Verd a ray classic.


GoL
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 19, 2013 at 02:21 PM Author: Silverliner
in the usa we have two different 1kw ballasts. theres the H34 ballast which is for a 130v, 8A lamp (such as the above). then theres the H36 for a 250v, 4A lamp which is the more common type in the usa.

May all the great lighting technologies have their place in history.

Administrator of Lighting-Gallery.net. Need help? PM me.

rjluna2
Sr. Member
****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 290
View Gallery

Robert


GoL
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 19, 2013 at 02:39 PM Author: rjluna2
Isn't the 130 volts version has the shorter arc tube?

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

Ash
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Posts: 3631
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 19, 2013 at 03:23 PM Author: Ash
Now i get it exactly whats going on in US ballasts in this range, so thanks

Rjluna :
130v can be used on a choke with 240v mains. 250v cannot

So for the 240v countries the 130v lamp is better as it allows to use plain choke ballast

For 120v neither lamp can be used with a choke, so auotransformer (HX or CWA) is required anyway, then i guess the 250v lamp would be more efficient..

But - places where such big lamp would be used, would probably have 240-277v supply available, then why not go and use the 130v lamp with a choke there too ? - My guess is that significant part of places have 120v only (at least in the wiring to the fixture), so the 250v lamp became overall the more common standard
funkybulb
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 646
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Apr 20, 2013 at 06:05 AM Author: funkybulb
Nice interesting lamp. yea it bad enought that H34 ballast is rare as rocking horse turds around here.
It prolly be easier to import 1000 watt ballast from 240 volt country and use our american dryer socket
or step up transformer. I find 60 hz not affected on 50 Hz ballast.

No LED gadgets, spins too slowly.  Gotta  love preheat and MV. let the lights keep my meter spinning.

LandryB
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 21
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
May 10, 2013 at 06:58 PM Author: LandryB
I have a couple of 80w mercury lamps from Belgium. A 75w H43 ballast is the closest I have to 80w
Globe Collector
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 26
View Gallery

Preserving the Brightest Ideas of Our Age


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jun 19, 2013 at 02:20 AM Author: Globe Collector
I could tell it was European at the first glance! At 60Hz, the inductive reactance of the inductor/choke is a little higher, so the lamp underpowers slightly.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

rjluna2
Sr. Member
****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 290
View Gallery

Robert


GoL
View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Feb 07, 2014 at 08:36 PM Author: rjluna2
@Ash: I don't mind explaining the difference voltage for these types of bulbs, but I am wondering if the 130 Volts uses the shorter arc tube than the regular one that I know of.

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

ricksbulbs
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 8
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Jul 23, 2015 at 11:35 PM Author: ricksbulbs
rjuna 2---YES the arc tube is shorter and "fatter". This makes the lamp have a lower arc voltage and higher current. The arc runs at a lower current density in the 130 volt 8 amp lamp, so isn't as thin and as intense as the lower current, higher voltage 250 volt lamp. The lower current density, and also attendant lower operating pressure (which is achieved by the larger tube diameter) results in a lower arc voltage. The higher current is due to the lower current density and fatter, thicker, but less intensely bright arc. This is due to the fact that the arc stream involves more mercury vapour molecules, in other words more volume of ionized vapour, which has a lower resistance than a longer, thinner arc stream, and for the same wattage takes more current (amps). Also, not only the lower current density of the high current low voltage lamp causes a drop in light output, but so does the shorter arc length, with no increase in current density. Thus, even though the H-34 "high current, low voltage" lamps can run on simple choke ballasts off 240 volts, they produce considerable LESS light than the US style H-36 "Low current, High Voltage" type lamps, with there attendant longer arcs for more arc emitting surface area, AND thinner, more intense arcs. If you try to run an H-34 type on an H-36 ballast, the lamp will NOT run up to full, and the current, already heavy at 8 amps, will be even higher because of even lower current density due to not fully running-up. the result, a DIM lamp and a ballast "stuck" in the higher current area it goes through during run up of the proper H-36 lamp, which is not harmful because it only lasts a short time, but on the H-34 lamp, running on H-36 gear, the constant "stuck in the high current phase of the run up" effect will heat the ballast pretty badly. Conversely, if you install an H-36 lamp on H-34 high current gear, one of 2 things will occur--1: the lamp will not start at all, because the open circuit voltage is way below what is needed to start a higher voltage H-36, which can be as much as 420-440 volts, and 2: IF it starts, it will take a heavier current on run up, but nit as heavy as the other way around, and at the most will run dim. The gear will likely run cool as the lamp will he too low current to load up the gear much once it gets as bright as it will get. Thus either way, the lamp will NOT run correctly, and in one case the gear can be burned up.

Also, of note---the H-34 types (high current, low voltage) usually don't start well below 50 degrees F. This is because, in spite of the shorter arc tube and lower starting and running voltage, the already lower static pressure of the buffer gas in the arc tube, which allows easy ignition on the lower mains voltage, gets even lower when the lamp is cold, and this lowers the pressure enough to make striking impossible. On the low current high voltage H-36 types. starting is reliable down to as low as -20 to even as low as -40 to -50 degrees F! This is because of the higher pressure of the fill gas, and DOUBLE the OCV of the ballast! So, here in the US, the very rarely used H-34 type lamps were stared for INDOOR use at 50 F or higher.The H-36 were the choice for outdoor lighting except in all year long warm climates. There were some beautiful /C phosphored vintage GE H1000C34-12 lamps on ebay back around 2003 or 2004, and I never got any--and regret it now! If I had one I could compare the arc tube size to the common H-36 lamp! (plus have rare as hens' teeth /C type H-34-12 lamps in my collection! I seriously wouldn't doubt that most H-34 high current, low voltage lamps used here in USA were also run on simple choke ballasts, since I have seen and HAVE street lights with H-36 simple choke ballasts that run on 480v systems to get enough starting OCV, yet reap the benefits of low ballast losses of a simple choke and lighter weight to boot! Hope this all clears up your curiosity! Cheers, Mate! Rick "C-6 Delair!
© 2005-2019 Lighting-Gallery.net | Powered by: Coppermine Photo Gallery