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Burned out IG SP-2 double power strip with a plug from the third floor of my hostel

Burned out IG SP-2 double power strip with a plug from the third floor of my hostel

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Two high power appliances were connected to this power strip: A washing mechine and a cloths dryer.
Max wattage rating up to 3500W.
The socket where the cloths dryer connected, burned out its neutral. The plug of the cloths dryer, burned as well.
Currently the washing mechine is disabled, as it isn't turns on (Probably its electronic card was dead)

IMG_1017[1].jpg Nisko_wall_mounted_power_strip_with_4_sockets.jpg IMG_0975.JPG IMG_0491~0.JPG

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Filename:IMG_0975.JPG
Album name:dor123 / Miscellaneous electricity
Keywords:Off-Topic
File Size:253 KB
Date added:Oct 04, 2012
Dimensions:2050 x 1537 pixels
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Prismatic
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Oct 04, 2012 at 06:25 AM Author: Prismatic
Wow. I've never seen such a destroyed power connector. Looks quite dangerous

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rjluna2
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Oct 04, 2012 at 06:26 AM Author: rjluna2
Yikes!

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

dor123
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Oct 04, 2012 at 06:40 AM Author: dor123
This is what happens when two high power appliances connected to a power strip and operated for a prolonged time. This causes overloading of the power strip and overheats the connectors, resulting in plastic melting.
This is why appliances shouldn't be connected to power strips, but only to independent sockets.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

marcopete87
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Oct 04, 2012 at 07:21 AM Author: marcopete87
dor, it depends about which power strip you are using: if you are using an p.r.c. (proud reproduction of crap) power strip you can expect this.
althought it can be caused by socket, particular attention is reuired by plug: misalignment of one pin can cause this too.
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Oct 04, 2012 at 09:38 AM Author: jercar954
Wow, you're lucky you didn't have a fire!

Preheat and T-12 fluorescents forever! Down with LED's and instant start T-8 fluorescents.

BG101
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Brian TheTellyman
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Oct 07, 2012 at 12:15 PM Author: BG101
The problem with these power strips is that many people don't realize that the TOTAL rated load is 16A - and I have read that the Israeli sockets are over-rated even at that. I have seen some burn-ups in my time but it looks like the material this is made of isn't suitably heat resistant.


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FrontSideBus
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Oct 07, 2012 at 12:33 PM Author: FrontSideBus
Looks like a bad connection there. Wasn't that thing fused?

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Oct 08, 2012 at 04:57 AM Author: Ash
As you can see what overheated is 1 pin in 1 of the plugs - Which means that the problem was either with the plug coming out of the power strip, or bad internal connection in the power strip or in the plug at this pin

Those sockets are rated to 16A (3500W) but in reality they dont hold up well above 10A

Whats odd is that up to about 1980 the standard rating for sockets was indeed 10A. Then the standard changed to allow 16A in the same sockets - You can actually see sockets made around that time where the manufacturer "corrected" th 10A to 16A in the etch without any actual changes to the socket construction

Later sockets were actually worse - In the 80s and earlier manufacturers like Citor made the sockets of very thermally stable plastic - It would discolor and stink but would not melt and expose contacts, also contacts were made with springs to hold them together. Later manufacturers turned to cheap plastic and done away woth the springs to cut down costs, so today's sockets are rated to higher current AND are less reliable than the old even at the same currents

This is a splitter that plugs in a wall socket. Splitters dont have fuses here. The only protection is 16A breaker in the panel and it is sufficient. No fuse would prevent what happened here anyway since the current is the same as when everything is ok - there was no overcurrent condition here
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Oct 08, 2012 at 07:14 AM Author: FrontSideBus
Ash, that sounds dodgy!

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Oct 08, 2012 at 10:58 AM Author: Ash
It is. But there is more to it

In the late 80s they realized that the sockets burn out at 16A and decided to redesign them to make plugs with round oins instead of flat. This did not happen untill mid 2000s but now our plugs are with round pins (sockets have holes like the one in this pic so they accept both old and new plugs)

This did not really change much - Those sockets still dont hold 16A. But they added another problem - in older sockets that were used with plugs with flat pins the contacts are allready forced wider apart and they tend to be quite loose with new plugs with round pins (the round pins are thinner than the width of the flat pins used to be)
FrontSideBus
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Oct 08, 2012 at 12:03 PM Author: FrontSideBus
I do think that our 13A BS1363 plugs rated are a bit conservatively tbh. During experimentation* and using a special fuse** I've pulled 50 amps out of one of our sockets (not for long though as it was on a 32a mcb!) and the only damage was that the switch welded itself closed!

*Arcing with twin MOT's
**Cap screw

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Oct 08, 2012 at 12:58 PM Author: Ash
We use larger sockets that resemble UK ones but with round pins for A/C. Oddly enough they are rated to 16A same as the small standard ones. In fact those can withstand like 20A (25A if conditions exceptionally good), the limiting factor is the small contact area in the connection of the wire to the screw in the socket terminals

Sure for shorter periods you can pull way more current, after all it all takes time to heat up.....

Some A/C sockets however are equipped with a switch (2 pole 1-0 switch with neon in it), the switch rating is something like "16(4) A" - I guess they mean 16A for switching capacity (limited by spark on contacts) and 4A for load capacity (limited by heating of conductors), In fact those switches are ok for about 5-10A (depending on quality of individual switch). The socket manufacturer however rates the entire unit at 16A and thats it. And yes those switches burn up if loaded too much - usually their contents just melt out of the back untill some contact breaks or untill the live and neutral terminals "float" towards each other in the softened plastic

On the other hand, i have 3 light switches from the 50s rated to 6A, they were abused at 10A + arcing from capacitors for like 50 years everyday switching and are still ok
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Oct 08, 2012 at 01:04 PM Author: FrontSideBus
That sounds a bit like the old BS546 with plugs for 2, 5 and 15 amps. There was a 30 amp version for industrial use but now if you need more than 13 amps you need IEC 60309.

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Brian TheTellyman
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Oct 09, 2012 at 11:31 AM Author: BG101
I use an MK BS546 5 amp socket for my freezer and now also my new fridge as it's on a 6A MCB feeding this and the central heating boiler. Now using a new 3-way 5 amp adaptor bought from a hardware shop yesterday along with a spare 5A plug and a few other bits (including a brass BC socket for use with my SOX entry light project). These are probably under-rated as the whole plug including the screw terminals is more substantial than the CEE-7 standard rated at 16A! Both my welding rigs came with CEE-7 plugs (in adaptors to allow use in BS1363 sockets, but with a restriction on maximum current). I made an extension lead with nice thick cable with a CEE-7 line socket on one end and matching plug at the other. This should have no problem with loading/voltage drop I hope.


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Oct 09, 2012 at 12:29 PM Author: FrontSideBus
Is BS546 still in the regs?

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Brian TheTellyman
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Oct 10, 2012 at 01:35 PM Author: BG101
I believe so but will have to check


BG

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Oct 11, 2012 at 04:44 AM Author: Proteus
Older swiss power sockets used a porcelain base with heavy metal contacts, they were rated for 250V 10A, with screwing connections for the wires. They were everywhere in the past fused with 16A and almost all survived till today, also at permanent high load. Today's sockets were made of plastic, with thin contacts for the plug and wire connections where you only can put the wire in, without screw. Many of them don't survive a load of 10A over longer time, especially if people, who don't have the plan how to connect it correctly, mount them theirself.
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Oct 11, 2012 at 09:20 AM Author: Ash
Our sockets used to be made with "ceramic plastic" bases and covers - Thats how some good manufacturers like Citor made them

This material when heated very substantially (from a hot connection) discolors, smells, cracks etc but it does not melt - everything remains in place and safe
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