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Sodium 35W SOX on 12V electronic ballast

Sodium 35W SOX on 12V electronic ballast

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This electronic ballast was from a solar PV powered off grid system. It is designed to run 26W SOX lamps on 12V DC

sli200ballast.jpg gec_leaktrans.jpg 12vSOX.jpg 1kw_mercury_ballast.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Fixture
Ballast Type:electronic inverter
Electrical
Voltage:12V
Physical/Production
Application/Use:solar street lighting

File information

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Filename:12vSOX.jpg
Album name:tuopeek / Gear
Keywords:Gear
File Size:155 KB
Date added:May 22, 2011
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Date Time:2011:05:22 15:08:23
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dor123
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May 22, 2011 at 09:49 AM Author: dor123
We have vintage solar powered LPS lanterns near soldiers bus stations that aren't operating today.
Their LPS lamps operates from 12V batteries, and also from 12V ballasts like in your experiment, but their ballasts are magnetic and not electronic as these lanterns are very old and are from the era before the electronic ballasts invented.
Here is a picture of one of them.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

tuopeek
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tuopeek 111967450636623837217 tuopeek1 77334065@N05/
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May 22, 2011 at 10:11 AM Author: tuopeek
The small electronic ballast should be a bit more efficient than large magnetic ones. I guess the lights in your picture had quite big batteries and solar panels. These days LED lights seem to be prefered for solar installations.
dor123
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May 22, 2011 at 10:18 AM Author: dor123
@Bulb Freak: Are you sure that electronic ballasts was already existed in this era of the 40"?
In this era, the microprocessor (Which was the first miniature semiconductor electronic part) was yet to be invented, and miniature electronics was also yet to be invented.
If computers were existed in this era, their electronics was relyed on thermionic valves (Vaccum tubes).
Electronic ballasts, uses many of the parts that exists also on modern computers and the modern miniature electronics, and so i don't think that electronic ballasts that based on thermionic valves were existed, so these 24V electronic ballasts probably have been ahead of their time.
It is interesting to see how they were looks.
Since miniature capacitors and resistors was yet to be invented, they probably were much more bulkier then the modern low wattage and even mains wattage electronic ballast.
Since the lantern i pictured here haven't such bulk part, i think that it uses 12V or 24V magnetic ballast and not electronic ballast, or the ballast is underground so i can't see it.
@tuopeek: The solar panel are indeed big, however i don't noted that the solar panels got smaller for their power during the years.
I don't know what the power of this solar panel is, but i"m sure that the LPS lamp in it is 18W.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

Medved
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May 22, 2011 at 10:40 AM Author: Medved
@dor123: I would like to see any non-electronic ballast operating from any low voltage DC.
Here (former communist bloc) electronic inverters were in use in buses since 60's, so in "western" world it should have been already in 50's...
Electronic ballasts for low DC voltage supply came with first germanium power transistors, before these the power conversion would be too inefficient, so fluorescent lighting would have no system efficacy benefit over incandescents.
Only exceptions are tram's, where the 600VDC (and above) allow quite efficient resistive ballasts (because of the DC, the OCV does not have to be as high, so lamps were operated as multiple in series)

With DC is one difference: On AC ballast you already have the AC present, so you suffice with transformers and/or reactances. But with low voltage DC you need to first create any form of AC, without this step it would not work at all.

No more selfballasted c***

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May 22, 2011 at 11:40 AM Author: SeanB~1
The first car radios used an inverter to supply power, using a transformer and a valve rectifier on the secondary, with the switching done by a vibratory driver, basically a relay designed for a equal closing and opening time, with a set of high current contacts that applied a square wave at the battery voltage to the transformer, and a small low current normally closed contact to supply battery voltage to the coil inside the vibrator. The coil operated a low frequency tuning fork that operated the contacts to provide alternating closures of the contacts without overlap, making a chopped ac for the transformer. These were quite reliable and were used for many years into the transistor age, only being superseded when reliable high current silicon transistors became common in the 1960's. They were then replaced by the now well known simple inverter circuits.
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May 22, 2011 at 12:00 PM Author: Kev
@ everyone so many parts is why they are so s*!t! Dor123 i would love one of the 12V magnetic ballasts for SOX lamps you talk about!

Voted to leave the EU and proud! 👉🏻🇪🇺🇬🇧

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May 22, 2011 at 12:47 PM Author: Luminaire
I want a vacuum tube HF ballast.
Medved
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May 22, 2011 at 01:29 PM Author: Medved
@SeanB: I have seen these, but they do not like other then rectifier and/or resistive load (due to contact arcing wear), so were usable only with rectifier followed by capacitive load (typical vacuum tube electronic), so unsuitable for powering lamp ballasts.
But I remember rotary converters in use as an "central" inverter to generate AC power (220V 50Hz) for "classical" ballasts in rail cars (one inverter per car, then one regular preheat ballast per lamp), they used compound motors for load/battery voltage compensation (stator was excited by parallel winding, while few turns connected in series to deexcite it by total input current). But they were soon replaced by medium frequency solid state inverters (about 1..3kHz due to the limitations of available components and to not need electrolytic capacitors there; one per lamp), the reason was obviously the efficiency...

@Luminaire: It would be nice toy, but the efficacy would not be as excellent...

@Kev: Issue is, then no solid state (so no moving components) converter from DC voltage to higher voltage without the use of any active semiconductor exist.
So or it was already an electronic ballast (most likely, semiconductors are available since early 50's) or some electromechanical inverter (either rotary or vibration). None of these could be then classified as "pure magnetic"...

No more selfballasted c***

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Sep 05, 2011 at 05:01 AM Author: f36t8
About magnetic DC ballasts:

In a 1940s magazine I have seen an ad for a device that could power fluorescent lights from DC (in the 1940s there was still a significant number of people here that had DC mains power apparently). There were no explanation to the inner workings in the ad, but fortunately I found an article about fluorescent lights on DC in another of those magazines, which mentioned the particular product. From what I understood it was a mechanical switching device, like the vibrating relays already mentioned by SeanB, but it required special ballast, which had a coil in series with a capacitor. I can upload scans the ad and the circuit diagram, but not until this or the next weekend.
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Feb 12, 2019 at 06:30 AM Author: d3anio97
I need me a few of those ballasts!! I'd love to make a SOX fixture that could be run on a 3s Li-Ion battery pack I have 35w ballasts but they pump out DC which would damage my lamps.

It'd be neat as hell too if we could reverse engineer one without wrecking it, get the schematic and start making them

What if I told you you could save 100% of your street lighting budget? Don't believe me? Buy an LED street light and run it for a week. the results will leave you in awe. (Aaaaaaand maybe wondering why you swapped that 70w SON)

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tuopeek 111967450636623837217 tuopeek1 77334065@N05/
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Feb 12, 2019 at 01:50 PM Author: tuopeek
Quite a simple oscillator and quite easy to copy. The only thing is to find out or guess the transformer windings ratios.
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