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LED streetlight testing

LED streetlight testing


First street lit by LEDs for a test.
And it is really bright!!!

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Filename:DSC00555.JPG
Album name:duluxs / Lanterns
Keywords:Lanterns
File Size:57 KB
Date added:Jan 30, 2010
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Date Time:2010:01:30 21:35:45
DateTime Original:2010:01:30 21:35:45
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magslight
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Jan 30, 2010 at 02:24 PM Author: magslight
And the other lanterns, which lamp and which lanterns they are?
Yes ,bright
duluxs
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Jan 30, 2010 at 02:26 PM Author: duluxs
Which ones do you mean, the ones in the background?

An the best is: the snow is white again, and has no longer the ugly orange colour of HPS!!!
magslight
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Jan 30, 2010 at 02:27 PM Author: magslight
Yes, I think this is the most important thing LOL
duluxs
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Jan 30, 2010 at 02:30 PM Author: duluxs
I donīt like yellow snow

The ligth in the background is from the train station, it are fluorescent tubes.
Selenium
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jeremy.exalum
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Jan 30, 2010 at 02:46 PM Author: Selenium
An interesting test in winter with snow
duluxs
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Jan 30, 2010 at 02:49 PM Author: duluxs
The test will last one year and after that, they decide if more of them will be installed.

So they are also tested during cold winter days and there is a lot light

Never thought, that I could become a fan of LEDs
Medved
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Jan 30, 2010 at 02:58 PM Author: Medved
The question is, how long they will last...

No more selfballasted c***

duluxs
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Jan 30, 2010 at 03:02 PM Author: duluxs
Yes sure, I donīt really believe that they will really last 20 years!
magslight
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Jan 30, 2010 at 03:52 PM Author: magslight
I think this will be defect completly when the first LED is diing. This can happen very fast!
Alights
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USA (120V 60HZ)


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Jan 30, 2010 at 03:56 PM Author: Alights
I dont understand why we use LEDs for street lighting when there are not even any usable incandescent drop in retrofit LED bulbs that are bright enough.

Magnetic ballasts and old school electronic only zone!  No T8 instant start

bluelights
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Jan 30, 2010 at 05:10 PM Author: bluelights
You can see the road is not lit evenly, this is another problem with LEDs, worse optical control...

"The orange cloud looks like floating nuclear waste."
Save the mercury lamp

Medved
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Jan 31, 2010 at 12:07 AM Author: Medved
@Alights: Making direct incandescent retrofit is very large technical challenge, mainly due to thermal management issues. No wonder, it yield to so much problems with these retrofits (life, use limitation not obvious for normal users, efficacy, light quality, cost,...)
When designing special lantern, the thermal management is much easier, as it might become part of the lantern, so it is not limited to size of any former light source. So at least a chance to get reasonable life is there. But the high required output ask for or huge amount of LED chips or for their high loading. The first drive the cost to levels unacceptable for many users, the second to short life...

No more selfballasted c***

duluxs
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Jan 31, 2010 at 02:04 AM Author: duluxs
Another aspect is, that LEDs are not that energy efficient than I thought:
One of those fixture needs 52 W. Compared to 50 W HPS it is only about 13 % less,
compared to PL-L 24 W it is even more...
Medved
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Jan 31, 2010 at 02:32 AM Author: Medved
PLL does not give as good light distribution control...
And you should compare it with equivalent illumination, so i guess 35W CMH would do the job and with better color quality...

No more selfballasted c***

duluxs
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Jan 31, 2010 at 02:51 AM Author: duluxs
But PLL is mostly used and common today.
Because of cost and quality reasons, CMH is very rare in germany, especially for "normal" streetlighting.
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jeremy.exalum
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Jan 31, 2010 at 03:51 AM Author: Selenium
CMH are more and more used in France for stretlighting and residential area. The quality is very good with a great light distribution control.
The warm white is generally used for street and cool white for pedestrian area.

But i prefer warm white (830) than cool white (942)
bluelights
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Jan 31, 2010 at 04:10 AM Author: bluelights
Selenium, I thought it would be the other way around - warm for pedestrian areas and cool for street lighting, to keep the drivers acuity (light with more blue spectrum increases awareness).

"The orange cloud looks like floating nuclear waste."
Save the mercury lamp

dor123
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Jan 31, 2010 at 05:12 AM Author: dor123
The problem in LEDs street lighting in very cold winter is as Medved said is because of the electrolytic capacitor in the "driver" that operate the LEDs. Unlike most electronics (Include the LEDs themselves) that are performs better in cold environment, In electrolytic capacitors it is just the opposite: It is not operating correctly in low temperature. This may cause a chain reaction of unreliable performance of the integrated circuits of the driver thet operates the LEDs and may eventually kill it.

I"m don't speak english well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I hope that LED won't replace all forms of other light

bluelights
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Jan 31, 2010 at 05:27 AM Author: bluelights
I think it wouldnt matter for the LEDs much if the electrolytic capacitor would be left out (replaced with a small film capacitor) and the LEDs would run with a 100/120Hz ripple.

"The orange cloud looks like floating nuclear waste."
Save the mercury lamp

SeanB~1
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Jan 31, 2010 at 05:38 AM Author: SeanB~1
The electrolytics could be completely replaced by polycarbonate film capacitors, like those used for motor run and power factor correction, but the replacement is physically a lot larger, cannot be mounted on the board, and costs a whole lot more. This would give a very long lifetime, at the expense of having to use a 25A bridge rectifier to allow self healing in the capacitor without blowing up the power supply side.
Medved
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Jan 31, 2010 at 06:33 AM Author: Medved
@SeanB~1: Why do you think you would need a 25A rectifier? There is no reason for higher rating then with electrolytics. The only issues with film capacitors are the size and cost. And only in the case you really want smooth light without the 100(or 120)Hz flicker. But such strong requirement is really an overkill for general lighting. Such fast flicker might cause issues only in the presence of mains powered rotating machinery or in the film industry. In first case the lighting equipment will never get so cold, so electrolytes are not a problem, or multi-phase supply might be used, as it is already present on the place; In the second the cost is not as big problem, so specially designed or shorter lived ballasts are of no problem...
My comment about LED's and low temperature (somewhere else) was meant about using the LED system BELOW the RATED temperature range. I didn't meant, then it is impossible (or even too difficult) to design a LED ballast for arctic temperature, only the temperature range requirement has to be included in the specification since the early equipment design.

No more selfballasted c***

SeanB~1
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Jan 31, 2010 at 10:45 AM Author: SeanB~1
Film capacitors will give the 10+ year life required in a street lamp, irrespective of temperature swings experienced. The high rating on the rectifier will be needed to handle the high current that the capacitor will draw during self healing, otherwise it will fail as a short circuit and blow a low rated fuse, so you will probably need a 16A fuse and a bridge to match. The high temperature will be experienced irrespective of location, as the heat will be generated by solar heating, and the lows will be there during power failures or group switching failures if the ambient is low enough or there is no cloud cover ( you can make ice in deserts during the night). This precludes most common electrolytic capacitor types, and those that are left are not available in high voltage variants. The bulk capacitor will thus have to be a film unit, as the electronics then become the limit for temperature swings. Using a source with high ripple will lower the efficiency of the output, as you need a high degree of control of lamp current and a proper compensation for die temperature to ensure long life. Best is to have a well regulated primary supply to start with, and use a switching supply to give a lower intermediate rail that can be well smoothed with high temperature range electrolytic before the lamp current is set.
bluelights
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Jan 31, 2010 at 11:36 AM Author: bluelights
Or maybe use a SMPS which can regulate properly from ~30% of the peak supply voltage, then even without any filter capacitor it will supply the LEDs with constant current most of the time, it will drop out just close to the mains waveform zero crossings.

"The orange cloud looks like floating nuclear waste."
Save the mercury lamp

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