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All Finished! McCann Lighting Mini Reflecto-Bay™ High Bay Fixture

All Finished! McCann Lighting Mini Reflecto-Bay™ High Bay Fixture

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35W HPS, 120V. The ballast housing is three junction box extenders screwed together and its about the same size as the bucket reflector! I'm very pleased with how this turned out. An NOS Sylvania 35W HPS lamp is on its way from eBay.

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Album name:streetlight98 / McCann Lighting - "Lighting for Now, Lighting Forever!"
Keywords:Lanterns
File Size:547 KB
Date added:Oct 04, 2014
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Date Time:2014:10:04 14:16:39
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themaritimegirl
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Oct 04, 2014 at 01:16 PM Author: themaritimegirl
That looks excellent! And I didn't know you could do that with junction boxes.

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streetlight98
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Mike McCann


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Oct 04, 2014 at 02:22 PM Author: streetlight98
Thanks! These aren't regular junction boxes though, they're junction box extensions, basically a cast aluminum junction box without a back (just a open bottom and top). I'm pretty sure the NEC only allows one box extender to be attached to a a regular junction box (for both round and gang boxes). Here I just connected three box extenders together. the bottom one is bolted to the bucket, the second is screwed into the first, third into the second, and cover into the third. The cover is a floodlight plate but instead of floodlights, I have three romex clamps. The center romex clamp is for the power cord and the two outside ones grip the suspension chain.

This looks really nice on the outside but it's a rat's nest inside lol. I tried to be as neat as I could but it's very cramped inside that center box where the ballast is. The bottom box houses the socket (since the socket is half-recessed) and the top box section is for the wiring connections for the cord. I decided to remove some of the plastic knockout covers to allow ventilation as the heat test proved that this thing gets pretty toasty.

Will a 100W HPS lamp running on a 35W ballast make the ballast run hotter? will the ballast run cooler with a correct 35W lamp or hotter? The 100W lamp didn't warm up enough to require restrike time; it did an instant-restrike when i cut the power and turned it back on.

This was an inexpensive project too. The only things I had to buy were the three box extenders, the floodlight plate to use as a cover, and the lamp that I just bought for this. Everything else I had laying around. If I don't find a use for this I'll create a McCann Lighting box for it and package it up as an NOS light and maybe I'll keep it sealed for years and eventually unseal it years from now.

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

themaritimegirl
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Oct 04, 2014 at 02:41 PM Author: themaritimegirl
The ballast may possibly run hotter, yes, if the 100 watt lamp isn't getting enough power to run up to the running voltage of a 35 watt lamp.

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streetlight98
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Oct 04, 2014 at 03:03 PM Author: streetlight98
Ah good so it should run a little cooler when a proper 35W lamp is installed? Then the 35W lamp will make more heat than the 100W lamp so the fixture will probably run just as hot lol. When I get the 35W lamp I'll have to chain it up in the garage just to see how bright it is.

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

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Nov 17, 2014 at 08:05 AM Author: Beta 5
Imagine this with a 50w MBF or a 18/35w SOX

Thorn Beta 5 35W SOX 1965 - 2008. Top entry/Side entry

streetlight98
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Nov 17, 2014 at 07:08 PM Author: streetlight98
MBF? I think 18/35W LPS/SOX would be way too big for this homemade light. Maybe the cobrahead street light I was hanging this front though.

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

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Nov 17, 2014 at 08:17 PM Author: themaritimegirl
I think MBF is their term for mercury vapor. I have no idea what it's supposed to stand for, though. Yeah, 35 watt LPS would definitely stick out. Not sure about 18 watt.

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Nov 17, 2014 at 08:24 PM Author: sol
Nice fitting !

Re the MBF designation, M designates mercury vapour, B stands for the successor to the A (MAF) type with hard glass arc tube. The B type (MBF) uses quartz arc tube. Finally the F stands for fluorescent (coated). There is a less common MBU type where the U is for uncoated. The uncoated lamps may have been etched (frosted) to diffuse light, but has no phosphor coating.
streetlight98
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Nov 17, 2014 at 09:10 PM Author: streetlight98
ah i see. Here we use the ANSI coding which is /DX for deluxe white phosphors and no suffix for clear/uncoated lamps. I had wanted to make this either a low-wattage PSMH like 35W or so or MV but a 35W HPS ballast is the only ballast that would fit, being similar in size to a 14-20W preheat choke. A 50W HPS ballast was too big to fit.

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

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Nov 18, 2014 at 12:57 AM Author: Beta 5
yeah in MBF M=Mercury B=the high pressure F=Fluorescent(coated) and if you ever hear is said as MBFU, most MBF lamps actually are MBFU as the U-Universal(burning position)
MAV I Think is M=Mercury A=Medium pressure V=vapour (uncoated) the MAV lamps had to be operated vertically or the arc would bow up and explode the arctube, if you wanted to use it horizontally it had to have a magnetic arc deflector see a classic horizontal MAF/MAV lantern the GEC Z8421 "Dioptrion" :
http://www.midlandcountiesstreetlighting.co.uk/LantHPS35.html#Dioptrion

Thorn Beta 5 35W SOX 1965 - 2008. Top entry/Side entry

streetlight98
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Nov 18, 2014 at 06:01 AM Author: streetlight98
I see. We had medium pressure MV lamps too in the 1940s and they too needed to be run vertically or a magnetic disc used. Are the North American and European lamps the same with different names or are the lamps different in some way? (besideds E26 and E39 vs. E27 and E40)

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

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Apr 08, 2015 at 05:38 AM Author: Beta 5
I think they are the same, just different wattages we have 50w, 80w, 250w, 400w (most common)and you guys have 40w/50w, 75w, 100w, 175w, 250w and 400w

Thorn Beta 5 35W SOX 1965 - 2008. Top entry/Side entry

streetlight98
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Apr 08, 2015 at 12:51 PM Author: streetlight98
I've seen Feit 80W MV lamps used here. The most common mercs in the USA were the 100, 175, 250, 400, 1000, and in some cases 700W. 125W was used in Canada but never saw much use in the rest of North America. I think the 175W MV and 400W were probably the most commonly used lamps here. In general, the street lights here are mogul based whereas residential fixtures tend to be medium base (though 175W MV residential lights are usually mogul base because the medium base cram versions are too uncommon.

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

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Apr 08, 2015 at 03:11 PM Author: Cal
the technology is certainly no different, I run a US 50W merc over here on 240V 50Hz, it doesn't bother it presumably because the ballast sorts it out so the input voltage it doesn't care about.

How common were 100W mercs in street lighting? I have a Westy Lifeguard /C on its way to me (nearly here!) with a mogul base which I found rather unusual for such a small lamp. Over here 125W mercury has an E27 base (although oddly, 100W sodium has E40).
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Apr 08, 2015 at 03:41 PM Author: streetlight98
100W MVs were VERY common here in New England but other parts of the country tended to use 175W most of the time. 100W MVs are the most common MV still left here, since they continued to relamp the remaining ones that weren't replaced in the early 90s until recently. 175W, 400W, and 1000W mercs were replaced instead of relamped after the late 90s. Now any merc is replaced upon requiring a new lamp unfortunately. They never used 250 or 700W MV in Rhode Island for whatever reason. As for HPS, 50, 70, 100, 250, and 400W fixtures are offered. 50 and 70W both replaced 100W MV depending on what part of the state the light is in. One utility company used 70W lights and the other used 50W. Now everything is owned by one utility and they kept the wattages the same so 50W is used where they used 50W and 70 where they used 70W. For a short while they were using 50W in the "70W territory" but now they use 70W. There's a small number of experimental 150W HPS cobraheads here in more upscale neighborhoods and industrial parks but get replaced with either 100 or 250W HPS upon requiring a lamp.

Please check out my newly-updated website! McCann Lighting Company is where my street light collection is displayed in detail.

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