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Ending the noble gas conspiracy once and for all.

Ending the noble gas conspiracy once and for all.

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So, today I took on the challenge on ENDING the conspiracy on what color does each noble gas glow. In this example photo you see these gas presented in three manners. The GLOW BOTTLE, pure discharge tube and domestic light sign.

Now I write GLOW BOTTLE in capitals, because fluorescent Starters are GLOW BOTTLES, not long tubes. Because of that you can see in the first row all five noble gasses glowing in their respective colors:

1. Helium is Pink.
2. Neon is Orange.
3. Argon is bluish purple, but It think that he camera did not captured the true color, because argon is more bluer, more like in the third row example of argon gas.
4. Krypton is White.
5. Xenon is bluish white.

Now, in the next four pictures I will present four gasses discharging in their respective distinctive colors in Fluorescent starter glow bottles. All except Krypton, because I don't have krypton gas filled starter at the moment. So let's begin debunking the conspiracy. Once and for all, because I am tired of people always mixing up argon and helium discharge color. Gosh! My OCD is driving me crazy, I want to finish this business. once and for all!

Argon_gas.jpg Helium_gas.jpg neon-20tubes.png youtube_oWaAUIvhqHY.jpg

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Album name:vytautas_lamps / Random home-made projects
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Date added:Nov 23, 2018
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dor123
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Nov 23, 2018 at 12:05 PM Author: dor123
I didn't know that the color of the gas can change drastically between glow discharge, cold cathode positive column and hot cathode thermionic discharge.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

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Robert


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Nov 23, 2018 at 12:41 PM Author: rjluna2
It depends how the camera capture the certain amount of energy level of these discharged lamps. Here is one from the Time Life Science Library: Matter: The Inert Gases book that I have in my library.

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

James
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Nov 24, 2018 at 04:40 PM Author: James
That's an excellent montage of photos! The spectrum of the discharge is indeed strongly dependent on the type of discharge, and also on the current density - so a given lamp can change at different powers. The changes can be very significant. So there is no single colour for each gas. However the generally accepted most pure spectrum is the low current density positive column discharge, such as is produced in spectral lamps.

Note also that for the case of fluorescent starters, none of them are made using pure gases. They always contain mixtures of at least two, more commonly three different gases, so as to tailor the electrical and thermal characteristics to give the desired starting behaviour. This makes it very difficult to determine the gas filling of a starter just by looking at the discharge colour. Moreover the colour is different in the different parts of the discharge around the electrodes. Sometimes it is possible to identify the gasfilling by spectroscopy, but also in some cases not all of the gases are actually ionised, and then other techniques like mass spectroscopy are needed (destructive).
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Jan 13, 2020 at 01:27 AM Author: lights*plus
Good description James, as always. To see the actual colors, you need to get the spectrum of each with a modified camera. Modified meaning that there's no filter in front of the CMOS (or CCD) sensor...

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