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8 early 1940s Sylvania daylight F40T12s saved

8 early 1940s Sylvania daylight F40T12s saved

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Saved from an old building tear down recently.

IMG_0660.JPG IMG_0666.JPG IMG_0663.JPG IMG_0109.JPG

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:sylvania
Lamp
Lamp Type:F40T12
Base:bi pin
Service Life:not long , 2500 hrs
Fixture
Location:building location tx
Electrical
Wattage:40 watts
Physical/Production
Fabrication Date:1942 to 1944 estimated

File information

File information

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Filename:IMG_0663.JPG
Album name:vintagefluorescent / vintage fluorescent
Rating (2 votes):
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:425 KB
Date added:Mar 18, 2014
Dimensions:2050 x 1537 pixels
Displayed:370 times
URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-91957
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Larry
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Mar 18, 2014 at 12:55 PM Author: Larry
What a find. Glad they found a good home.

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's GE Power Groove

SeberHusky
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Mar 18, 2014 at 04:01 PM Author: SeberHusky
How would you go about cleaning these without taking off the writing? Maybe a steam vapor treatment?

I collect exit signs, preferably vintage ones.

I also have a little bit of a thing for light bulbs, too. Of course, hoarding them due to the incandescent bulb ban.

(Signature last updated October 27, 2011)

Alights
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USA (120V 60HZ)


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Mar 18, 2014 at 04:36 PM Author: Alights
Way cool find Roger!

@seberhusky: usually I look and determine if its an inside or outside etched lamp, if its inside I go ahead and use glass cleaner if not I just avoid the etch area
Larry
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Mar 18, 2014 at 10:01 PM Author: Larry
I would be careful cleaning these. Is that a etch or printed on? I would guess the ends are steel not brass, but may be not.
During the war many brass parts were switched to steel due to the war effort. I would be afraid to try to clean the ends up.
The cement might be a little brittle by now.

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's GE Power Groove

Powergroove
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Mar 18, 2014 at 10:08 PM Author: Powergroove
Those are great lamps you have there.

Keep government out of the lighting industry.

jercar954
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Mar 19, 2014 at 01:36 PM Author: jercar954
These are okay to clean- they are inside etched.

Preheat and T-12 fluorescents forever! Down with LED's and instant start T-8 fluorescents.

socketgeek63
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TheDennisManNetwork photoelectric4863
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Mar 19, 2014 at 03:27 PM Author: socketgeek63
That is one awesome save!!

Long live the great old 20th century quality in electrical & lighting products!

Larry
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Mar 19, 2014 at 03:39 PM Author: Larry
From my 1941 GE lighting engineering guide it lists the 40 watt fluorescent bulb at 2500 hours service life. I would guess Sylvania would be about the same. Since the ends look ok, they might be NOS. That would make them super rare.

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's GE Power Groove

vintagefluorescent
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Mar 19, 2014 at 07:22 PM Author: vintagefluorescent
Thanks Everyone !!!!

Alights , Thanks !!!! Pardon the mess as I have not had time to clean these up and organize ,

The etches are inside & I only wiped off just enough dirt to display the etches .
ricksbulbs
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Feb 21, 2015 at 07:11 PM Author: ricksbulbs
1943---those have steel bases. These were tin-plated to try to reduce corrosion. You should see spots of it still there in most cases. Sometimes zinc was used as a galvanizing of sorts, like cheap zinc-plated bolts--they look great until they get wet ONCE then they RUST LIKE CRAZY LOL! I have some MAZDA lamps that were this way, and U just wire brished them or used coarse then fine steel wool, often the wire brish is good initially, then the steel wool, once the steel shines, coat them with a good lacquer or clear Krylon FUSION paint, and they'll look pretty much as the did with the plating in 1943. Some were also brass plated, and I have a few WW2 MAZDA incandescents with brass-plated steel bases, also prone to rusting! The Chinese dollar store bulbs often have steel bases, tin or zinc plated, and these will rust as well, so silicone grease on the bases is a must outdoors and in damp locations on these! The steel bases are a real piece of history to be proud of--as they used what they could and still made it work. Yankee ingenuity at work again! These lamps are incredible, and sometimes I get a little emotional thinking that these not only survived nearly 80 years so far, but they make me think of all the people who died to make sure we are free, so it is a bit bittersweet. I think the old Hygrade/Sylvania lamps were made better than both the GE and Westinghouse MAZDA lamps with their fragile cathodes prone to going open. I have a 1939 Hygrade 15 watt daylight T-8 for my 1939 manual-start desk lamp I just totally restored recently after years of semi exposure to the weather in my storage trailer (too close to the always open back door!) that I used to do my homework with as a kid. I had put in a modern ballast and a starter and socket, but saved the original ballast, and put it back to 100% original, down the the "thin section" type DPO #20 gauge lamp cord running up through the 2 support arms---this thin cloth cord is really hard to find in good shape believe me! The refinish is factory original and authentic with Krylon "Hammered" paint in 2 clolrs as was original--copper on the base, antique gold on the reflector, and I have the 1970's Sylvania F15T12/CW in it I used as a kid, but will re-unite this lamp with it's original brass end Hygrade lamp soon! Cannot wait to see it running on it's original ballast again in the original fixture it came in--what a great feeling it gives me. Runs will be only now and then to preserve this 1500 hour lamp, but it has very low hours on it anyway! I haven't lit that Hygrade since about 1977, when I got the lamp, and remember the color being slightly pinkish for daylight and low light output compared to today's daylight lamps. Funny--a song that was popular on the radio when I got that lamp is playing now! How ironic! I'd LOVE to see these old Hygrade/Sylvanias lit! They should be fine. This was a great find indeed!
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