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Cooper Hewitt lamp

Cooper Hewitt lamp

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This is my second Cooper Hewitt lamp in my collection. I have no further data for this lamp. Even the age is difficult to estimate but I think this is a very early form.

Philora-2.jpg Philora-4.jpg cooper-1.jpg cooper-2.jpg

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Filename:cooper-1.jpg
Album name:rigo / Very old discharge lamps
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Keywords:Lamps
File Size:371 KB
Date added:Jun 18, 2018
Dimensions:2048 x 1536 pixels
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URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-147646
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rjluna2
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Robert


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Jun 18, 2018 at 07:21 AM Author: rjluna2
Very nice find, rigo

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

sox35
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Jun 18, 2018 at 07:21 AM Author: sox35
This is wonderful..! Are you able to light it, I wonder..?

Ria in Aberdeen
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rjluna2
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Robert


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Jun 18, 2018 at 07:27 AM Author: rjluna2
That is for the low pressure as one atmosphere during operation as described at the Historic Discharge Lamp website: http://www.lamptech.co.uk/Documents/M6D%20Exhausting.htm

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

rigo
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Jun 18, 2018 at 07:45 AM Author: rigo
Yes rjluna2 - I know the side of James! Unfortunately, no operating data for this lamp!
wishus
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Jun 18, 2018 at 07:50 AM Author: wishus
Excellent score on such a specimen rigo!
I would advise caution about trying to fire up the lamp though... Cooper-Hewitt lamps are under high vacuum and utilized iron electrodes (from what I can remember) and it definitely looks like there is rust on the left electrode. I could be wrong though... is this colour normal for the electrode?
Definitely test for vacuum before applying power! I'd hate for you to damage the lamp.
Thanks for posting!

Interested mainly in discharge lighting (mercury, sodium, neon) and also old and unusual incandescents.

rjluna2
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Jun 18, 2018 at 09:54 AM Author: rjluna2
In another part of the page at James Hooker's site tells us the operating parameter were 110 Volts, 3.5 Ampere

http://lamptech.co.uk/Documents/M6A%20Lamp%20Design.htm

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

rigo
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Jun 18, 2018 at 10:25 AM Author: rigo
I have read this part many times. I always thought that was for the long version. But I was wrong. Ok - I'm learning to read better. Thank you

Now all I need is a transformer, rectifier and a suitable resistor.
rjluna2
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Jun 18, 2018 at 10:41 AM Author: rjluna2
I don't think you need a rectifier. The bulb itself is a rectifier. Just the suitable transformer and a ballast/resistor to limit the current.

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

sox35
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Jun 18, 2018 at 10:42 AM Author: sox35

I don't think you need a rectifier. The bulb itself is a rectifier. Just the suitable transformer and a ballast/resistor to limit the current.

I thought they were designed for DC supplies only..?

Ria in Aberdeen
It'll be all right in the end, and if it isn't all right, it isn't the end  Smiley

rjluna2
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Jun 18, 2018 at 10:44 AM Author: rjluna2
It is nothing but a glorified diode, Ria

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

sox35
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Jun 18, 2018 at 10:57 AM Author: sox35

It is nothing but a glorified diode, Ria

I'm just going by what it says here.

Ria in Aberdeen
It'll be all right in the end, and if it isn't all right, it isn't the end  Smiley

rjluna2
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Jun 18, 2018 at 11:12 AM Author: rjluna2
That is the basic operation principle of the diode

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diode#Rectifiers

Here is the National Electronics, Inc NL-866A Mercury Vapor Rectifier which it contains just cathode heater to push the electron to the anode.

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

xmaslightguy
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^homebuilt fixture


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Jun 18, 2018 at 09:48 PM Author: xmaslightguy
That's an interesting...bong

---------
but joking aside: cool lamp/find!

So in a way this thing is like a giant high-powered LED?

Colored Fluorescent's such as F40T12 Red or  Green or Blue are awesome...

sox35
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Jun 19, 2018 at 07:08 AM Author: sox35

That is the basic operation principle of the diode

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diode#Rectifiers

I know what a diode is, I took the amateur radio exams..! But there are AC and DC versions of this lamp and this looks like the DC version.

Ria in Aberdeen
It'll be all right in the end, and if it isn't all right, it isn't the end  Smiley

Medved
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Jun 19, 2018 at 11:47 AM Author: Medved

I don't think you need a rectifier. The bulb itself is a rectifier. Just the suitable transformer and a ballast/resistor to limit the current.



In order to operate this as a lamp, you need steady current flow, this can not rectify its own supply.
It is true this is able to conduct the current only in one direction, but it is not able to work as a rectifier.
The reason is, when rectifyin, the current flows only part of the time and other part it does not. With a discharge it means when the current does not flow, the discharge dies and so you have to reignite it each time you need the current to flow again.
And the discharge reignition is, what this device is not able to do (unlike modern AC discharge lamps).

So once you have only one anode, there is no other way to ensure a steady (uninterrupted) cathode current flow than providing that from a DC power supply with a filter.

The "AC" variant had two anodes on the anode end. These two anodes were in fact the rectifier in the lamp, the rest (the main tube length and the cathode) was just the "load" and fed from the already rectified and filtered supply. These two anodes were able to transfer the steady current from one to other once the mains polarity was changing, provided there was sufficient inductor in series (the main filter), which ensured the current was flowing even when there was no voltage during the AC zero cross.

This is the same reason, why high power mercury rectifiers were always made as 3- or even 6-phase units. That arrangement means the cathode current could be steady, just the anodes take over the discharge as the voltage phase "rotates" in the power system.
Or if these were to be used as "diodes", they needed an auxiliary "keep-alive" anode, which function was to maintain the discharge during the time periods when the main current can not flow, so provided the means for a fast reignition of the main arc path once the diode became "forward" biased.
The "keep alive" was present even in the multiphase units, but the reason there was to maintain the ionization for times when the output became unloaded (no train on the section, or the driver decides to coast with no power need), so the unit becomes operational instantly once the load appears back (e.g. the train driver applies power to accelerate).

No more selfballasted c***

rigo
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Jun 19, 2018 at 12:17 PM Author: rigo
Thanks Medved
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Jun 19, 2018 at 05:27 PM Author: Lumex120

That's an interesting...bong

Yea, but you probably wouldn't want one full of mercury...

Any machine is a smoke machine if you operate it wrong enough.

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Aug 05, 2018 at 12:43 PM Author: Lampje
Now, this is one of the rarest items on this gallery.
I have never seen a Cooper Hewitt lamp in real, only as a drawing or a photo in a low resolution in old books.
Thanks for sharing this beautiful piece of history.




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Aug 05, 2018 at 01:00 PM Author:
Indeed a very nice item, I havesome pictures and literature about these lamps dating from 1908 but it is to long and detailed to post on here sadly, there is also a later model than this that has a gls lamp at the beginning of the tube as well as a mercury vessel.
rigo
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Aug 05, 2018 at 01:26 PM Author: rigo

Now, this is one of the rarest items on this gallery.
I have never seen a Cooper Hewitt lamp in real, only as a drawing or a photo in a low resolution in old books.
Thanks for sharing this beautiful piece of history.



Thanks -
I have the lamp from a collection from your country. But it is a long story. I still have this lamp in my collection:
https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?album=83&pos=29&pid=108453




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Aug 05, 2018 at 01:30 PM Author:
My literature shows this lamp hanging from a cylinder which contained an induction coil and ballast designed to start and run the lamp, it also suggest there was more than one size/length of these made
Lampje
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Aug 05, 2018 at 03:32 PM Author: Lampje
Well, I am glad this lamp is in your collection now.
It is important that someone has it, also a reason why other collections are so interesting.
There are lots of lamps I don't have and maybe will never get, but when I am looking at the collections of the members of this Lighting Gallery it makes me very happy.
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Jan 14, 2020 at 07:05 AM Author: Metal Halide Boy
Intristing lamp!
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