Return to the thumbnail page Display/hide file information See previous file See next file

Ballasts from the F4T5 Desk Lamp

Ballasts from the F4T5 Desk Lamp

Click to view full size image

I'm still wondering why they're rated 50Hz?

01un.JPG 01u.JPG 01F4T5b.JPG 01f4t.JPG

File information

File information

Download: Download this File
Filename:01F4T5b.JPG
Album name:DimBulb / fluorescent stuff
Keywords:Gear
File Size:485 KB
Date added:Aug 09, 2018
Dimensions:2210 x 1682 pixels
Displayed:63 times
URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-149531
Favorites:Add to Favorites
Comments
Alex
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 26
View Gallery

Mit dem Osten Siegen!


View Profile WWW Personal Message (Offline)
Aug 10, 2018 at 12:06 AM Author: Alex
They are German ones. Here we have a frequency of 50Hz. But it is strange that it is used in the US

Stopt den LED Scheiss -- Machen wir das Gluehlicht wieder Grossartig!

monkeyface
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 115
View Gallery

Wolfram Verdampfungsgefässe


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Aug 10, 2018 at 01:36 AM Author: monkeyface
So at the end the whole fixture is made in Germany by Waldmann. This company is well known to make desklamps for professional use as well for turning lathe and fine mechanics.
DimBulb
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 48
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Aug 10, 2018 at 01:38 AM Author: DimBulb
Thanks!
Was 110V used anywhere other than North America? The lamp does have a European type plug.
I've never seen anything like this here in the US before.

My very first word was LIGHT!

monkeyface
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 115
View Gallery

Wolfram Verdampfungsgefässe


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Aug 10, 2018 at 01:47 AM Author: monkeyface
France and Belgium in certain regions but thats very long time ago.
monkeyface
Full Member
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 115
View Gallery

Wolfram Verdampfungsgefässe


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Aug 10, 2018 at 01:48 AM Author: monkeyface
Construction sites in the UK still uses sometimes 110V with a insulated transformers for their tools.
Medved
Hero Member
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3906
View Gallery

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Aug 10, 2018 at 02:51 AM Author: Medved
Till the WW2, big part of the continental Europe was 110/120V. It was with the post-WW2 reconstructions, when the conversion to 220..240V happened. 50Hz was used all the time from the first introduction of AC distribution in Europe.
With that the feed arrangement changed as well: Here the 120V was the voltage between phases, so each line had about 70V to ground. It was a safety measure before the concept of PE became the mainstream: If there was any isolation fault in the equipment, the voltage towards ground was 70V, so at that time considered acceptable for a fault condition, yet the supply was acceptably sufficient 120V (so not too excessive currents in the wiring).
Later (somewhere after WW1) the concept of interconnecting and grounding the "dead" metal part became the common place, which allowed to prevent any significant voltage on these accessible parts during a fault without the direct link to the feed supply voltage, so the higher voltage installations became accepted as safe for home use.
At that time there were many local networks operating even DC power (120V as well), so it was quite practical to design appliances so they will be compatible. There the arcing problems won't allow any higher voltages (appliances would become too expensive), so that formed quite significant part of the opposition against moving to higher voltage standards.
And the spread of electrical power appliances between the WW's made the power demand of the households increasing, so just the 120V became too low, so the great rebuild after WW2 (when most of the isolated systems just fell apart due to neglected maintenance in the war time) and the networking most of the installations together (so moving them to AC) was the trigger to move to the 220V mains systems.
In many old districts (which escaped big damage of the WW2) of big cities the 120V remained really till around the 2000...
But all the time the AC frequency was 50Hz.

No more selfballasted c***

DimBulb
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 48
View Gallery


View Profile Personal Message (Offline)
Aug 10, 2018 at 02:23 PM Author: DimBulb
Thanks for the info!!!

My very first word was LIGHT!

© 2005-2018 Lighting-Gallery.net | Powered by: Coppermine Photo Gallery