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6000 Lumens Westinghouse 6.6 Amps Series Incandescent

6000 Lumens Westinghouse 6.6 Amps Series Incandescent

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Incandescent bulbs for use in 6.6 amps constant-current series roadway lights.

They're made by Westinghouse, and the barely visible etch on top reads "W" 6.6 A 6000Lm.

They are massive in size.

DADDCuEVoAAzQww_jpg-large.jpeg fullsizeoutput_890.jpeg fullsizeoutput_88f.jpeg fullsizeoutput_88c.jpeg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Westinghouse
Lamp
Lamp Type:Incandescent
Filament/Radiator Type:V
Base:E39
Electrical
Wattage:Unknown
Voltage:Unknown
Current:6.6 A
Optical
Lumen Output:6000

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Sep 25, 2018 at 11:57 AM Author:
These series street lights fascinate me, we've never had such a system over here.
migette1
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Sep 25, 2018 at 02:25 PM Author: migette1
Is this system still used in The States, think I have one of these smaller series lamp if I can find it its made to short out if it fails so the other lights stay on,I will put up if I can find it......peter

Interested in the history of electric lighting and incandescent in particular and neon glow lamps.





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Sep 25, 2018 at 02:30 PM Author:
Not sure if it's still used anywhere, somebody will no doubt tell us
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Sep 25, 2018 at 02:52 PM Author: migette1
I have just found that lamp and will put it up next day as I have done my limits for today, it shorts out when its burnt out Its very old.

Interested in the history of electric lighting and incandescent in particular and neon glow lamps.

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Sep 25, 2018 at 03:19 PM Author: Miles
Yes, very few places still use series incandescent systems. Suburbs of Pasadena, CA is one I can think of, with a combination of post-top acorns and radial waves.

They slowly ramp up when they turn on, it's pretty neat. I always wondered if this simply the way the constant current transformer is working when powered up, or if this is intentional to avoid in-rush current.
Also, don't ask me where they still get replacement 6.6A bulbs haha, because I've looked all over and can't find any!
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Sep 25, 2018 at 03:30 PM Author: Ugly1
The major lamp manufacturers stopped listing incandescent series lamps at least 20 years ago. That’s not to say someone might still be making them. The New York City Subway System still uses Chinese made 130 volt 36 and 56 watt street railway lamps operating 5 in series on the 600 volt track circuit. I recently purchased a set of contract documents for maintaining traffic signals in New York City. It specified that all replacements of incandescent bulbs shall be 16,000 hour traffic signal bulbs. I had never heard of 16,000 hour traffic signal lamps.
H&H Lighting makes them in the USA. They are listed on eBay ( 273478381250) . So anything is possible.
Check out eBay item 310372615814. This is a 175 watt GE mercury vapor luminaire for use on 6.6 amp series circuits. Note the 5,000 volt wire on the primary of the ballast and matching high voltage terminal blocks.
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Sep 25, 2018 at 03:43 PM Author: Miles
Hey Ugly1, couple of questions:

I've seen that 175W series luminaire before, and yeah, the fat terminals gave it away. The thing I don't understand is, why isn't the voltage listed on the label? I know very little about series systems, but any electrical device I know has to be rated for a voltage supply. Surely you can't just hook this up to whatever voltage you want, as long as it's 6.6 amps.
Even series Christmas lights replacements have a voltage rating.

I heard NYC subway still uses incandescents as they're though enough to endure grime, vibrations, socks, etc. Regarding the traffic signals, I barely see incandescent tricolors anymore, is there a reason why NYC is sticking to incandescent as opposed to the LED bandwagon?




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Sep 25, 2018 at 04:04 PM Author:

Yes, very few places still use series incandescent systems. Suburbs of Pasadena, CA is one I can think of, with a combination of post-top acorns and radial waves.

They slowly ramp up when they turn on, it's pretty neat. I always wondered if this simply the way the constant current transformer is working when powered up, or if this is intentional to avoid in-rush current.
Also, don't ask me where they still get replacement 6.6A bulbs haha, because I've looked all over and can't find any!

That must be impressive to see, wish we had something like that over here
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Sep 26, 2018 at 12:42 AM Author: migette1
just put my series lamp up.....peter

Interested in the history of electric lighting and incandescent in particular and neon glow lamps.

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Verd a ray classic.


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Sep 26, 2018 at 01:30 AM Author: Silverliner
In a lighting store located in West Los Angeles I found several NOS GE 2500 lumen 6.6A street series lamps. Of course, I bought em.

May all the great lighting technologies have their place in history.

Administrator of Lighting-Gallery.net. Need help? PM me.

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Sep 26, 2018 at 02:30 AM Author: migette1
Good find, these are not found here UK

Interested in the history of electric lighting and incandescent in particular and neon glow lamps.

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Sep 26, 2018 at 11:41 PM Author: don93s
@Miles, those series lamps are designed to operate on a current regulated circuit. No matter how many lamps are lit or failed, it always maintains 6.6a. In reality, current, ie, electron flow, is what heats the filament. In this current regulated situation, the actual lamp voltage becomes unimportant as long as the lamps all match each other in amps.

However, if you wanted to run just a single lamp unregulated, the fixed voltage supply will then become important. That will determine lamp current. Best thing to do is get an AC ammeter and a variac capable of at least 6.6a and slowly turn up voltage until amp reading is 6.6a then measure what the voltage is. I have found that in some cases, for example, the voltage across the lamp may be like 11.5v.

If no variac, maybe try a 6v or 9v low voltage transformer to start with that can handle 6.6a just to see how it lights up and watch the current reading and work your way up.
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Sep 26, 2018 at 11:57 PM Author: don93s
One other thought...if these lamps are say, 18 lumens/watt (avg. incandescent), 6000 lumens would be ~330w. 330w divided by 6.6a is around 50v. But always start lower V than guessed calculation.
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Sep 27, 2018 at 12:08 AM Author: Miles
Hey Don! So are you saying that the constant current transformers that feed these series luminaries adjust its voltage based on the load / pull it receives?

Otherwise, this is what I don't understand: In my mind, you still need a voltage rating, even for a series electrical set-up, no? I take the example of Christmas lights, they're not rated in amps, they're rated in volts, as you divide the voltage supplied by the amount of bulbs. How does it differs for bigger incandescents used for roadways? They must have a set number of heads they can install per series loop feed?
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Sep 27, 2018 at 12:37 AM Author: don93s
Yeah, the series streetlight regulator has a magnetic mechanical design that raises/lowers voltage to maintain steady 6.6 amp.

The incandescent series Christmas lights are voltage rated because there is no current regulation. The way they are designed, when a single bulb fails, it shorts to keep others lit, and the remaining bulbs get a slightly higher voltage since the source voltage is fixed. That can cascade into faster failure with remaining lamps as they keep getting a higher and higher voltage to take up the slack causing a higher current. With the streetlights, a lamp failure won't change the voltage across the remaining lamps because the current is always maintained. Voltage and current are proportional in a resistance circuit.
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Sep 27, 2018 at 11:24 AM Author: Miles
Understood!

In that case, series HID luminaires such as mercury vapor must be incredibly inefficient on such circuits. I'm assuming since it's not a filament acting as a load / resistor on the circuit, you'd have to get a ballast that call pull a lot more when the lamp fails, or have some sort of isolation transformer that runs like a resistor?




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Sep 27, 2018 at 12:05 PM Author:
I don't think anything other than incandescents were ever used in such a system. Although as I'm not in the US, I could be wrong, although I don't see how..!
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Sep 27, 2018 at 02:30 PM Author: Miles

I don't think anything other than incandescents were ever used in such a system. Although as I'm not in the US, I could be wrong, although I don't see how..!



https://www.ebay.com/itm/310372615814

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mtr736/17058917912/




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Sep 27, 2018 at 05:46 PM Author:
Hmmm, interesting.
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Sep 28, 2018 at 04:45 PM Author: don93s
@Miles, pretty cool. I think I've seen other series-HID ballasts on eBay before. Even though they are inductive, there are similarities in how they behave on the 6.6a series circuit...but I've never experimented with one. I wonder how the run-up is compared to a regular reactive ballast with fixed mains voltage. On those (if LPF), the starting current is much higher than when fully warmed up. Here, it would be always 6.6a.

Probably more efficient in some ways because the entire circuit is always 6.6a so there may be less wire losses in resistance, whereas regular 120/240v circuits can be in the tens of amps or more. I'm only speculating. Incidentally, even though each ballast has a low voltage across the primary (or across incandescent bulb), the open circuit of the regulator can be a couple thousand volts as I understand...just like how a single Christmas light bulb are a few volts, the whole string is 120v source.
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Sep 28, 2018 at 04:49 PM Author: don93s
Just found this...I'll be reading it.

LINK
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Sep 28, 2018 at 05:29 PM Author: Ugly1
6000 lumen lamp- 2000 hour- 47.8 volts
6000 lumen lamp-3000 hour- 50.2 volts. 6.6 amp. From 1980 GE large lamp catalog
6000 lumen lamp- 6000 hour- 52.6 volts.
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Sep 28, 2018 at 07:03 PM Author: Miles

@Miles, pretty cool. I think I've seen other series-HID ballasts on eBay before. Even though they are inductive, there are similarities in how they behave on the 6.6a series circuit...but I've never experimented with one. I wonder how the run-up is compared to a regular reactive ballast with fixed mains voltage. On those (if LPF), the starting current is much higher than when fully warmed up. Here, it would be always 6.6a.

Probably more efficient in some ways because the entire circuit is always 6.6a so there may be less wire losses in resistance, whereas regular 120/240v circuits can be in the tens of amps or more. I'm only speculating. Incidentally, even though each ballast has a low voltage across the primary (or across incandescent bulb), the open circuit of the regulator can be a couple thousand volts as I understand...just like how a single Christmas light bulb are a few volts, the whole string is 120v source.



The ballast in the ebay link luminaire looks beefy. Possibly double the function as a running resistor / shunt in case the mercury lamp burns out?

Also, not really talking about HID in there, but you might enjoy consulting this, there's decent content in there
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Sep 30, 2018 at 06:14 AM Author: migette1
Some good info therethanks to you all, have a look at my very old series lamp showing how it continues to conduct current when it fails????

Interested in the history of electric lighting and incandescent in particular and neon glow lamps.

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Sep 30, 2018 at 07:15 PM Author: randacnam7321

Hey Ugly1, couple of questions:

I've seen that 175W series luminaire before, and yeah, the fat terminals gave it away. The thing I don't understand is, why isn't the voltage listed on the label? I know very little about series systems, but any electrical device I know has to be rated for a voltage supply. Surely you can't just hook this up to whatever voltage you want, as long as it's 6.6 amps.
Even series Christmas lights replacements have a voltage rating.

I heard NYC subway still uses incandescents as they're though enough to endure grime, vibrations, socks, etc. Regarding the traffic signals, I barely see incandescent tricolors anymore, is there a reason why NYC is sticking to incandescent as opposed to the LED bandwagon?

I did not see any incandescent lamps in use in the subways there when I was in NYC a year ago, but the subway stations and Grand Central Terminal had loads of F72T12 slimlines. The F72T12 is generally a fairly rare size, so this is probably to keep people from nicking lamps for their own use. I generally avoid going there cuz expensive and I hate cities in general. Upstate is bad enough.

Old school FTW!

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Apr 15, 2019 at 07:48 AM Author: Globe Collector
We had street series here in Australia although they were long gone before I was born, they were made in 6.6 and 20A ratings. I have one in my collection.

They were used to replace things like Pockell-Bell and Brush-Veinna carbon arc lamps that were the original series streetlights.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

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in my house is not used led and if I can avoid it


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Apr 15, 2019 at 01:41 PM Author: Daniel f
Hi . This type of light bulbs were used for purse seine fishing
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Apr 15, 2019 at 05:21 PM Author: Globe Collector
Interesting use....I wonder are they just low voltage lamps run in parallel from a low voltage generator of batteries on the boat or are they series lamps run from a higher voltage.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

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Apr 16, 2019 at 12:48 PM Author: trojmiejski
Series circuits as such are exotic enough but the existence of MV ballasts for series circuits is another level of awesome.
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Apr 17, 2019 at 01:23 AM Author: Globe Collector
As HID lamps are constant current devices all that would be needed is an ordinary transformer, used as a current transformer with an appropriate turns ratio. A standard 400w mercury lamp runs at 1.98A, so all that would be needed to a 33:10 turns ratio transformer with the "10" turns in the series string and the mercury lamp on the "33" turns of thinner wire side, of course the actual number of turns would depend on the core size...so 400VA, so saturation would not occur but the primary-secondary turns ratio would remain the same.



Actually, by tapping the secondary of if such a transformer, a wide variety of modern HID lamps could very easily be run off such a circuit.

I suppose you all realize that these circuits originally ran carbon arc lamps of a myriad of designs between 1880 and about 1930. They required having their rods changed frequently...once every few hours to once every few days depending on the specific design. (This would have kept gas lamp lighters in a job!)




The Current transformer driving the whole string would have a magnetic leakage path around the secondary exactly like a neon sign transformer, but bigger and with a secondary of a much lower open circuit voltage and would with thicker wire.

Manufactured articles should be made to be used, not made to be sold!

Fee, Fye, Fow, Fum, A dead man's eye and a parrot's BUM!

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