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1999 Philips S1000 – Electrodeless sulfur vapor lamp

1999 Philips S1000 – Electrodeless sulfur vapor lamp

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Shown here is a microwave-driven sulfur vapor lamp made by Philips for some scientific studies at the Technische Universiteit Eindhoven.

Philips-Arges-#2-75-150Wm.jpg Philips-Ar740m.jpg Philips-S1000m.jpg Philips-Te1170m.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:Philips
Model Reference:S1000
Lamp
Lamp Type:Electrodeless high-pressure chalcogenide vapor
Filament/Radiator Type:Thermal discharge in argon and sulfur vapor
Electrical
Wattage:1000 W
Optical
Lumen Output:175,100 lm
Lumen Efficacy:175.1 lm/W (lamp only)
Color Temperature:5840 K
Color Rendering Index:84 Ra8
Physical/Production
Dimensions:132 x 40 mm (L x Ø)
Factory Location:Eindhoven, the Netherlands
Fabrication Date:1999
Application/Use:Scientific investigations

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Filename:Philips-S1000m.jpg
Album name:Max / In collection
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:211 KB
Date added:May 04, 2019
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Silverliner
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May 05, 2019 at 04:16 AM Author: Silverliner
175 lumens per watt! Impressive! However not practical as a light source in most applications, you can't use electrodes with sulphur you know and such.

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May 05, 2019 at 06:16 AM Author: dor123
How the lamp can reach 175lm/w if the spectral output is continuous?

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

Max
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May 05, 2019 at 09:36 AM Author: Max
Silverliner - Yes, this is quite impressive. It's really a pity that performances are pulled down so much by the required microwave driver, and if you consider the whole lighting system then you end up with a total efficacy not much better than that from current state of the art CMH systems (but the light color quality is far better in the latter case). Interestingly, some people managed to make sulfur burners with special electrodes, but the performances were never replicated because changing the plasma shape from a ball to an arc increases heat losses tremendously, and this has a strong negative impact on efficacy.

dor123 - Here's why (same CCT of 5835 K in both cases):
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Jun 09, 2019 at 02:58 PM Author: AngryHorse
These are so intriguing , I’d love to see one of these actually running

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Street lighting in our town: Philips UniStreet LED

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Max
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Jun 11, 2019 at 03:05 PM Author: Max
Yes, those are really special lamps. You can check my profile picture on the left if you want to see what a sulfur lamp looks like in a microwave oven (the lamp was still relatively cold and light emission was mainly in the blue-UVA domain). Otherwise, member GlobeCollector has the setup to actually run them and I think he has a picture or two of one at full regime.
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Jun 11, 2019 at 03:22 PM Author: AngryHorse
I know the whole system was complicated, and there were inefficiency’s with the magnetrons, but the whole mystery behind these lamps is really interesting to me, you’re avatar pic is mesmerising with the plasma in the bulb, I bet their stunning to watch starting and running first hand?

Current: UK 230V, 50Hz
Power provider: e.on energy
Street lighting in our town: Philips UniStreet LED

"Beauty fades, dumb is forever".......Judge Judy Cheesy

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Jun 11, 2019 at 03:27 PM Author: Max
Yes, it's really nice seeing it starting this way, the purple plasma filaments keep on moving around as the sulfur pressure increases (I usually stop well before full regime because the lamp is never properly cooled inside a microwave oven, this quartz bulb should be rotated at high speed in a jet of compressed air). The set-up is quite complicated and the magnetron limits the system efficiency and service life. All considered, the sulfur system was just barely more efficient than state-of-the-arc quartz MH lighting systems, and this is what caused their fall from grace (their greenish light color did not help either).
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Jun 11, 2019 at 11:32 PM Author: dor123
1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_VeiZnNgKc
2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxhCX8Id9F0

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

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Jun 11, 2019 at 11:41 PM Author: tolivac
Seen a Sulphur vapor electrodeless light at one of the Smithsonian parking garages in Wash DC-light system installed by Fusion Systems of Rockville,MD.Toured their plant.Their main business is making electrodeless mercury lamps for intense UV production.They showed me how they make the bulbs-the mercury ones were 1000W and 2500 W used microwave oven magnetrons to drive the lamps.The Sulphur lamp needs to be rotated while lit to properly spread the Sulphur in the bulb.The parking garage light was a green-yellow-white color.Kind of spooky when you first see it.Saw it over 25yrs ago-don't know if its still in use.Ac light pipe routed the light in the parking garage from a central lamp-driver.
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Jun 12, 2019 at 10:55 AM Author: Max
Thanks for the links, dor.

tolivac - you are very lucky to have been able to see those sulfur lamps in operation and to tour Fusion's plant!
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Jun 13, 2019 at 11:18 AM Author: elek
Now I'm interested how hard is to make such lamp at home, do I need some special purity argon/sulphur or pure laboratory grade sulphur and Ar 4.8 for Tig welding is enough. Processing fused quartz is hard but it is skill you can learn and mechanical construction of this lamp is simpler than lamps with electrodes.
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Jun 13, 2019 at 11:26 AM Author: halofosfaatti
I have seen video about homemade sulfur lamp. There is also video of homemade sulfur lamp with electrodes on YouTube! It is possibly not long-lived . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTqrZyQdj6c

Too many things are secret. Only open information can really preserve old technology.

I like fluorescent and other conventional lighting and old electronic equipment. Today's things are not made to last.

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Jun 13, 2019 at 11:30 PM Author: dor123
With homemade sulfur lamps, I doubt that all of the sulfur vaporized, since they aren't operated at optimal conditions.

I"m don't speak English well, and rely on online translating to write in this site.
Please forgive me if my choice of my words looks like offensive, while that isn't my intention.

I only working with the European date format (dd.mm.yyyy).

I lives in Israel, which is a 230-240V, 50hz country.

Max
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Jun 14, 2019 at 11:29 AM Author: Max
elek - I don't think you'd need some super pure argon/sulfur here since there is no tungsten electrode to react to (that's an advantage of electrodeless lamps), so standard grade components should suffice. While it is true that impurities can increase the lamp voltage (or electric field, in the present case) significantly, this is not really an issue here because this kind of lamp is usually driven in a capacitive mode in the microwave cavity, and this calls for a high plasma impedance in order to maximize the power coupling efficiency.
Making and processing the quartz bulb will be the hardest part indeed if you plan on making a sulfur lamp yourself.

halofosfaatti - Interesting, thanks for the link.

dor123 - That depends on how much of this chalcogen is introduced in the lamp. I can imagine that a small sulfur dose can well be entirely vaporized in such home-made lamps.
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